Tidewater Lock

Last updated
Tidewater Lock
C and O Tidewater lock and Potomac River.jpg
Waterway Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
CountryUSA
State Washington, D.C.
OperationDefunct
Length54 m
Width4 m
Coordinates 38°54′00″N77°03′28″W / 38.8999°N 77.0578°W / 38.8999; -77.0578 Coordinates: 38°54′00″N77°03′28″W / 38.8999°N 77.0578°W / 38.8999; -77.0578

The Tidewater Lock is a dam [1] in Washington, D.C. to the west of the mouth of Rock Creek at the Potomac River, on the east side of Georgetown. Built to connect the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, opened in 1831, with the Potomac, it was a busy maritime intersection during several decades of the canal's heyday. C&O documents refer to it variously as Lock 0 and Tide Lock A.

Contents

Canal documents sometimes list a "Tide Lock B" on section "I" which stood at the lockhouse at 17th and Constitution Ave NW. It was completed in 1834. [2]

Today, the lock marks Milestone 0 of the National Park Service's Chesapeake & Ohio Canal trail. [3]

See also

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References

  1. "Tidewater Lock". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved January 26, 2014.
  2. Unrau, Harlan D. (2007). Historic Resource Study: Chesapeake & Ohio Canal (PDF). Hagerstown, Md.: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park. p. 213. LCCN   2007473571.
  3. "C&O Canal Maps". Chesapeake & Ohio Canal. National Park Service. Retrieved October 30, 2016.