Timeline of Boise, Idaho

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Boise, Idaho, United States.

Contents

19th century

Christ Chapel was constructed in 1866 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. Christ Chapel, Boise.jpg
Christ Chapel was constructed in 1866 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

20th century

Main Street in 1911 Main Street, Looking East, Boise, ID.jpg
Main Street in 1911
Map of Boise in 1917 1917 map Boise, Idaho Automobile Blue Book.jpg
Map of Boise in 1917
Boise's Carnegie Public Library opened in 1905 on Washington St. and remained at that site until the library moved in 1973. Boise, Idaho Carnegie library.jpg
Boise's Carnegie Public Library opened in 1905 on Washington St. and remained at that site until the library moved in 1973.
US Bank Plaza, constructed as "Idaho First Plaza," opened in 1978. Boise-us-bank-bld.jpg
US Bank Plaza, constructed as "Idaho First Plaza," opened in 1978.

21st century

Aerial view of Boise in 2007 Boise aerial 2007.jpg
Aerial view of Boise in 2007
Butch Otter and Lori Otter, Governor and First Lady of Idaho, open the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games C. L. Otter during the opening ceremony for the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games.jpg
Butch Otter and Lori Otter, Governor and First Lady of Idaho, open the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games

See also

Related Research Articles

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Bibliography

43°36′49″N116°14′16″W / 43.613739°N 116.237651°W / 43.613739; -116.237651