Timeline of Portland, Maine

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Portland, Maine, USA.

Contents

Prior to 19th century

Wadsworth-Longfellow House Front Wadsworth-Longfellow House Front.JPG
Wadsworth-Longfellow House Front

19th century

"Bird's Eye View of the City of Portland," 1876 1876 Birds eye view of the city of Portland Maine BPL.png
"Bird's Eye View of the City of Portland," 1876

20th century

21st century

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Portland, Maine</span> Largest city in Maine, United States

Portland is a port city and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maine and the seat of Cumberland County. Portland's population was 68,408 in April 2020. The Greater Portland metropolitan area is home to over half a million people, the 104th-largest metropolitan area in the United States. Historically tied to commercial shipping, the marine economy, and light industry, Portland's economy in the 21st-century relies mostly on the service sector and tourism. The Old Port is a prominent neighborhood known for its nightlife and 19th-century architecture. Despite the economic shift, the Port of Portland was still the second-largest tonnage seaport in New England as of 2019.

<i>Downeaster</i> (train) Amtrak service between Boston, MA and Brunswick, ME

The Downeaster is a 145-mile (233 km) passenger train service operated by Amtrak and managed by the Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority (NNEPRA), an agency of the state of Maine. Named for the Down East region of Maine, the train operates five daily round trips between North Station in Boston, Massachusetts, and Brunswick, Maine, with ten intermediate stops.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Portland Public Library</span>

Portland Public Library is the main library of the public library system in Portland, Maine, USA. It is located at 5 Monument Square on Congress Street in the Old Port of Portland, Maine. The library has three neighborhood branches, Burbank branch, Peaks Island branch, and Riverton branch.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Railroad history of Portland, Maine</span> Aspect of history

The railroad history of Portland, Maine, began in 1842 with the arrival of the Portland, Saco & Portsmouth Railway (PS&P). Most of the rail activity in Portland revolved around agricultural goods bound for export and import freight from Europe. Yet Maine's largest city also enjoyed 125 years of continuous passenger rail service, from 1842 until 1967, and Amtrak began serving the city in 2001. For most of Portland's history, passenger train schedules were designed with intercity travel rather than daily commuting in mind; passenger activities were mostly confined to intercity travel from Portland to Boston, Montreal, Nova Scotia, and points west.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Portland Company</span> Rolling stock manufacturer

The Portland Company was established 10 November 1846 by John A. Poor and Norris Locomotive Works engineer Septimus Norris as a locomotive foundry to build railroad equipment for the adjacent Portland terminus of the Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railroad connection between Portland, Maine and Montreal. The shops opened for business in October, 1847. Its first locomotive, the Augusta, emerged from the shops in July 1848 for delivery to the Portland, Saco & Portsmouth. Over the next several decades, the Company produced in its Fore Street facilities over 600 steam locomotives as well as 160 merchant and naval vessels, railcars, construction equipment, Knox automobiles, and the like. Portland Company built the engines of the civil war side-wheel gunboats Agawam and Pontoosuc. Taking into account its other products, the Company could lay claim to being one of the leading medium-to-heavy steel manufacturers in New England. The company ceased production in 1978.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">History of Portland, Maine</span>

The History of Portland, Maine begins when the area was called Machigonne, meaning "great neck," by Algonquians who originally inhabited the peninsula. It extends to the city's recent cultural and economic renaissance.

This is a timeline of the history of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Hartford, Connecticut, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of Lowell, Massachusetts, US.

The following is a timeline of the history of Lexington, Kentucky, United States.

Timeline of Newport, Rhode Island.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Nashville, Tennessee, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Newark, New Jersey, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Portland, Oregon, United States.

References

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  2. History of Peaks and House Islands – Nathan Goold (1897), p. 14
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Bibliography

Published in the 19th century
Published in the 20th century