Tochihikari Masayuki

Last updated

Tochihikari Masayuki
栃光 正之
Tochihikari 1958 Scan10006.JPG
Personal information
BornArio Nakamura
(1933-08-29)29 August 1933
Kumamoto, Japan
Died28 March 1977(1977-03-28) (aged 43)
Height1.76 m (5 ft 9+12 in)
Weight128  kg (282  lb)
Career
Stable Kasugano
Record577–431–11
DebutMay 1952
Highest rankŌzeki (July 1962)
RetiredJanuary 1966
Elder name Chiganoura
Championships 1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (3)
Fighting Spirit (2)
Gold Stars 4
Yoshibayama (2)
Kagamisato
Asashio
* Up to date as of June 2020.

Tochihikari Masayuki (29 August 1933 – 28 March 1977) was a sumo wrestler from Kumamoto Prefecture in Japan who reached the second highest rank of ōzeki in 1962. He joined Kasugano stable in 1952 and reached the top makuuchi division in 1955. He never won a top division championship but was a tournament runner-up four times. He was promoted to ōzeki in May 1962 alongside his stablemate Tochinoumi. He fought as an ōzeki for 22 tournaments but lost the rank after recording three consecutive losing scores and immediately announced his retirement in January 1966. He became an elder of the Japan Sumo Association under the name Chiganoura. He was a judge of tournament bouts and was involved in both the incorrect decision to award a win to Toda that stopped Taiho's 45 bout winning streak in March 1969 and the famous decision in January 1972 to declare Kitanofuji the winner over Takanohana by kabai-te. He died of rectal cancer at the age of 43. His shikona of Tochihikari was subsequently used by a later wrestler from Kasugano stable, also known as Kaneshiro Kofuku.

Contents

Pre-modern career record

Tochihikari Masayuki [1]
-Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1952x Shinjo
21
 
WestJonidan#24
71
 
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira
-New Year
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
Spring
Haru basho, Osaka
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1953EastSandanme#42
71
 
WestSandanme#16
44
 
WestSandanme#13
71
 
WestMakushita#38
62
 
1954EastMakushita#28
53
 
EastMakushita#18
80
Champion

 
EastJūryō#22
105
 
WestJūryō#14
114
 
1955EastJūryō#8
96
 
WestJūryō#3
150
Champion

 
EastMaegashira#13
105
 
WestMaegashira#5
87
 
1956WestMaegashira#2
78
WestMaegashira#2
510
 
WestMaegashira#6
87
 
WestMaegashira#5
69
 
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

Modern career record

Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1957WestMaegashira#6
123
 
WestKomusubi#1
69
 
WestMaegashira#1
510
Not heldEastMaegashira#6
96
EastMaegashira#2
411
 
1958WestMaegashira#8
114
 
EastMaegashira#2
87
 
EastKomusubi#1
78
 
EastMaegashira#1
96
 
EastKomusubi#1
411
 
EastMaegashira#4
87
 
1959EastMaegashira#1
96
 
WestKomusubi#2
96
 
WestSekiwake#1
105
F
EastSekiwake#1
105
 
EastSekiwake#1
87
 
EastSekiwake#1
510
 
1960WestMaegashira#1
87
 
EastKomusubi#2
87
 
EastKomusubi#1
69
 
WestMaegashira#1
78
 
EastMaegashira#1
69
 
WestMaegashira#5
69
 
1961EastMaegashira#7
87
 
WestMaegashira#3
87
O
WestMaegashira#1
87
 
EastKomusubi#2
105
F
WestSekiwake#1
87
 
WestSekiwake#1
312
 
1962WestMaegashira#4
114
 
WestKomusubi#1
105
O
WestSekiwake#2
132
O
WestŌzeki#2
114
 
EastŌzeki#1
114
 
WestŌzeki#1
105
 
1963WestŌzeki#1
96
 
EastŌzeki#2
132
 
EastŌzeki#1
96
 
EastŌzeki#2
123
 
EastŌzeki#2
69
 
EastŌzeki#3
87
 
1964EastŌzeki#3
96
 
EastŌzeki#2
465
 
WestŌzeki#2
114
 
EastŌzeki#2
123
 
EastŌzeki#2
87
 
WestŌzeki#2
87
 
1965WestŌzeki#2
114
 
EastŌzeki#1
96
 
WestŌzeki#1
366
 
EastŌzeki#2
87
 
WestŌzeki#1
69
 
WestŌzeki#1
510
 
1966EastŌzeki#2
Retired
510
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

See also

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References

  1. "Tochihikari Masayuki Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 26 September 2012.