Tonkin frog

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Tonkin frog
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Ranidae
Genus: Odorrana
Species:
O. bacboensis
Binomial name
Odorrana bacboensis
(Bain  [ fr ], Lathrop, Murphy, Orlov  [ fr ], and Ho, 2003)
Synonyms

Rana bacboensisBain et al., 2003 [2]
Huia bacboensis(Bain et al., 2003)

Contents

The Tonkin frog (Odorrana bacboensis) is a species of frogs in the family Ranidae. It is found in northern Vietnam and in adjacent southern China (Yunnan and Guangxi provinces). [3] [4] The specific name is derived from Bac Bo, the Vietnamese name for northern Vietnam, as the species was first described from there. [2]

Description

Male Tonkin frogs measure 36–55 mm (1.4–2.2 in) (based on just two specimens) and females 78–105 mm (3.1–4.1 in) in snout–vent length. [2] [4] Skin on the dorsum is shagreened with heavy granulations. The dorsum, flanks, and loreal region are brown with small black spots that get larger on the flanks. The upper and lower lips are creamy yellow with vertical black bars. The venter is creamy white, sometimes with light spotting. The iris is golden, and the margin of pupil has a striking yellow and red border. [2]

Reproduction

This species probably breeds in the autumn. The male has gular pouches, but the call is unknown. Unusually, the eggs are black, indicating that they are laid in places where they are exposed to sunlight to promote development. [2]

Habitat

Natural habitats are forested montane river systems.

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References

  1. IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group (2017). "Odorrana bacboensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2017: e.T58554A63900158. Retrieved 29 September 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Bain, R. H.; Lathrop, A.; Murphy, R. W.; Orlov, N. L. & Ho, T. C. (2003). "Cryptic species of a cascade frog from Southeast Asia: taxonomic revisions and descriptions of six new species". American Museum Novitates. 3417: 1–60. doi:10.1206/0003-0082(2003)417<0001:CSOACF>2.0.CO;2. hdl: 2246/2846 .
  3. Frost, Darrel R. (2016). "Odorrana bacboensis (Bain, Lathrop, Murphy, Orlov, and Ho, 2003)". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  4. 1 2 Wang, Ying-Yong; Lau, Michael Wai-Neng; Yang, Jian-Huan; Chen, Guo-Ling; Liu, Zu-Yao; Pang, Hong & Liu, Yang (2015). "A new species of the genus Odorrana (Amphibia: Ranidae) and the first record of Odorrana bacboensis from China". Zootaxa. 3999 (2): 235–254. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3999.2.4. PMID   26623573.