Torino Porta Susa railway station

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Torino Porta Susa
Nouvelle gare TGV de Turin Porta Susa.jpg
Turin Porta Susa railway station
LocationPiazza XVIII Dicembre, Turin, Metropolitan City of Turin, Piedmont
Italy
Coordinates 45°04′21″N07°39′57″E / 45.07250°N 7.66583°E / 45.07250; 7.66583 Coordinates: 45°04′21″N07°39′57″E / 45.07250°N 7.66583°E / 45.07250; 7.66583
Owned by Rete Ferroviaria Italiana
Operated by Rete Ferroviaria Italiana
Platforms6
Other information
IATA code ITT
History
Opened1868;153 years ago (1868)
Location
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Torino Porta Susa
Location in Turin
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Torino Porta Susa
Location in Piedmont
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Torino Porta Susa
Location in Northern Italy
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Torino Porta Susa
Location in Italy

Torino Porta Susa( IATA : ITT) is a railway station in Turin, northern Italy; it is the second busiest mainline station in the city, after Torino Porta Nuova. It is located in Corso Inghilterra .

Contents

History

The station was built in 1868 during the expansion of the city towards the west. Trains between Torino Porta Nuova and Milan stop at the station, including TGV services between Paris and Milan and other services using the Turin–Milan high-speed line.

Reconstruction

In April 2006, reconstruction of the station began in conjunction with the Turin Passante regional railway. This involved quadrupling of the number of tracks that run through central Turin. At Porta Susa station, the line was widened to six tracks with new platforms being built beneath the thoroughfare Corso Inghilterra. A 300-metre long, 19-metre high glass and steel structure has been built above the tracks to create a new station, which is intended to become Turin's main hub of urban, regional and international rail traffic.

The project was developed by the Paris-based studio, Silvio d'Ascia Architecture, in collaboration with AREP and Agostino Magnaghi, after the team had won an international competition. [1] The station was inaugurated on 14 January 2013 by Prime Minister Mario Monti. [2] The total cost – estimated at €65 million – was borne entirely by the rail network operator, Rete Ferroviaria Italiana (RFI). [3] Plans for the reconstruction project also included a 100-metre high office tower for the Italian State Railways, Ferrovie dello Stato.

The Turin Metro opened a metro station at Porta Susa, which provides additional connections with Porta Nuova and Lingotto.

Train services

The station is served by the following services:

Preceding station  SNCF  Following station
toward  Paris-Lyon
TGV
toward  Milan
Preceding station  Trenitalia  Following station
Terminus
Frecciarossa
toward  Roma Termini
Terminus
Frecciarossa
toward  Roma Termini
Terminus
Frecciarossa
toward  Salerno
Terminus
Frecciarossa
toward  Salerno
Terminus
Frecciabianca
Terminus
Intercity Notte
toward  Salerno
Terminus
Intercity Notte
Terminus
Treno regionale
toward  Milano Centrale
Terminus
Treno regionale
toward  Ivrea
Preceding station  Nuovo Trasporto Viaggiatori  Following station
Terminus
Italo
toward  Salerno
Preceding station  Turin SFM  Following station
toward  Pont Canavese
SFM1
toward  Chieri
toward  Chivasso
SFM2
toward  Pinerolo
toward  Torino Stura
SFM4
toward  Bra
toward  Torino Stura
SFM6
toward  Asti
toward  Torino Stura
SFM7
toward  Fossano

Metro services

Turin Metro service M1 serves the station.

See also

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References

  1. "Le stazioni per l'Alta Velocità (the stations for high-speed" (in Italian). Ferrovie dello Stato. Archived from the original on 12 December 2008. Retrieved 26 February 2008.
  2. "Italian premier opens rebuilt Turin Porta Susa station". International Railway Journal . Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  3. Mondo, Alessandro (30 December 2007). "La Nuova Porta Susa già in ritardo di un anno". La Stampa (in Italian). p. 66.

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