Triplophysa stenura

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Triplophysa stenura
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Cypriniformes
Family: Nemacheilidae
Genus: Triplophysa
Species:
T. stenura
Binomial name
Triplophysa stenura
(Herzenstein, 1888)

Triplophysa stenura is a species of ray-finned fish in the genus Triplophysa . [1] [2] It lives in swift-flowing streams and is known from the Upper Yangtze, Upper Mekong, Upper Salween and Upper Brahmaputra river drainages in China and Vietnam. Whether this apparently widespread species really is one species needs to be studied. [1] It grows to 13.8 cm (5.4 in) SL. [2]

A study from the Upper Brahmaputra found Triplophysa stenura to be the most prevalent prey species for Oxygymnocypris stewartii , a large predatory cyprinid. Triplophysa stenura were present in 47% of Oxygymnocypris stewartii stomachs. [3]

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Schizopygopsis younghusbandi is a species of ray-finned fish endemic to Tibet. It occurs in the Yarlung Tsangpo River drainage and in endorheic lakes in its vicinity. Schizopygopsis younghusbandi grows to about 50 cm (1.6 ft) in total length.

Triplophysa dalaica is a species of stone loach. It is only known from Hulun Lake in Inner Mongolia, China; it is believed to occur more widely as fish in this genus typically occur in running water.

Triplophysa grahami is a small species of stone loach from China. It is endemic to the Jinsha River basin in Yunnan, Southwest China. There is also a record from Lishe River, but this is believed to be a different species. It grows to 9.1 cm (3.6 in) standard length. It lives in the spaces between stones and floating grasses in slow streams.

Triplophysa microps is a species of ray-finned fish in the genus Triplophysa. It is found in shallow streams at the upper reaches of the Yellow, Yangtze, Salween, Mekong, Indus and Brahmaputra Rivers and also in alpine lakes in the Tibetan plateau.

Triplophysa obtusirostra is a species of ray-finned fish in the genus Triplophysa. It is endemic to Qinghai province, China, near the origin of the Yellow River.

Triplophysa orientalis is a species of stone loach. It is a freshwater fish from the Tibetan Plateau and is endemic to China; its distribution includes the upper reaches of the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, among others. It lives in a wide range of habitats, both lentic and lotic. The species is widespread but populations tend to be isolated and show high degree of genetic divergence.

Triplophysa siluroides is a large species of stone loach, which is endemic to the upper parts of the Yellow River basin in the Chinese provinces of Qinghai, Gansu and Sichuan.

Triplophysa stewarti is a species of stone loach in the genus Triplophysa. It lives in slow-flowing rivers and lakes among rocks and vegetation; it is found in numerous lakes and in upper Salween, Indus, and Brahmaputra drainages in Tibet as well as in Kashmir, India. It grows to 20.8 cm (8.2 in) SL.

Triplophysa tibetana is a species of stone loach in the genus Triplophysa. It is endemic to the upper Brahmaputra and upper Indus rivers in Tibet. It lives in slower flowing, shallow areas in lakes and rivers with ample aquatic vegetation. It grows to 13.3 cm (5.2 in) SL.

Chuanchia labiosa is a species of cyprinid fish that is only found in the upper reaches of the Yellow River basin in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau of China, where it mostly inhabits slow-flowing cold waters at altitudes above 3,000 m (9,800 ft). It is the only member of its genus, but is related to other schizothoracines like Aspiorhynchus, Diptychus, Gymnodiptychus, Gymnocypris, Oxygymnocypris, Platypharodon, Ptychobarbus, Schizopyge, Schizopygopsis and Schizothorax.

Oxygymnocypris stewartii is a species of cyprinid fish endemic to Tibet and occurs in the Yarlung Tsangpo River and its tributaries at altitudes above 3,600 m (11,800 ft) in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. It is the only species in its genus.

Platypharodon extremus is a species of cyprinid fish endemic to the upper Yellow River basin in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau of China. It is the only member of its genus, but is related to other schizothoracines like Aspiorhynchus, Chuanchia, Gymnocypris, Oxygymnocypris, Ptychobarbus, Schizopyge, Schizopygopsis and Schizothorax.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Ng, H.H. (2010). "Triplophysa stenura". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2010: e.T168598A6522411. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-4.RLTS.T168598A6522411.en . Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2014). "Triplophysa stenura" in FishBase . November 2014 version.
  3. Huo, B.; Xie, C. X.; Madenjian, C. P.; Ma, B. S.; Yang, X. F.; Huang, H. P. (2014). "Feeding habits of an endemic fish, Oxygymnocypris stewartii, in the Yarlung Zangbo River in Tibet, China". Environmental Biology of Fishes. 97 (11): 1279–1293. doi:10.1007/s10641-013-0213-8. S2CID   15291571.