Trout River (Northwest Territories)

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Trout River

Trout River rapids close to Sambaa Deh Falls Mackenzie Highway, NWT.jpg

Rapids on Trout River, from Mackenzie Highway
CountryFlag of Canada.svg  Canada
Flag of the Northwest Territories.svg  Northwest Territories
Physical characteristics
Main source Sambaa K'e
490 meters (1,610 ft)
60°44′18″N121°08′51″W / 60.73833°N 121.14756°W / 60.73833; -121.14756 (Trout River origin)
River mouth Mackenzie River
145 meters (476 ft)
61°18′15″N119°50′40″W / 61.30423°N 119.84453°W / 61.30423; -119.84453 (Trout River mouth) Coordinates: 61°18′15″N119°50′40″W / 61.30423°N 119.84453°W / 61.30423; -119.84453 (Trout River mouth)

Trout River is a river in the Northwest Territories of Canada. It is a major tributary of the Mackenzie River.

Northwest Territories Territory of Canada

The Northwest Territories is a federal territory of Canada. At a land area of approximately 1,144,000 km2 (442,000 sq mi) and a 2016 census population of 41,786, it is the second-largest and the most populous of the three territories in Northern Canada. Its estimated population as of 2018 is 44,445. Yellowknife became the territorial capital in 1967, following recommendations by the Carrothers Commission.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, many near the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

Mackenzie River largest river system in Canada

The Mackenzie River is the longest river system in Canada, and has the second largest drainage basin of any North American river after the Mississippi River. The Mackenzie River flows through a vast, thinly populated region of forest and tundra entirely within the Canadian Northwest Territories, although its many tributaries reach into four other Canadian provinces and territories.

The river gives the name to the Trout River Formation, a stratigraphical unit of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin.

The Trout River Formation is a stratigraphical unit of Late Devonian age in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin.

Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

The Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) is a vast sedimentary basin underlying 1,400,000 square kilometres (540,000 sq mi) of Western Canada including southwestern Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, Alberta, northeastern British Columbia and the southwest corner of the Northwest Territories. It consists of a massive wedge of sedimentary rock extending from the Rocky Mountains in the west to the Canadian Shield in the east. This wedge is about 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) thick under the Rocky Mountains, but thins to zero at its eastern margins. The WCSB contains one of the world's largest reserves of petroleum and natural gas and supplies much of the North American market, producing more than 16,000,000,000 cubic feet (450,000,000 m3) per day of gas in 2000. It also has huge reserves of coal. Of the provinces and territories within the WCSB, Alberta has most of the oil and gas reserves and almost all of the oil sands.

Course

The Trout River originates in Sambaa K'e at an elevation of 490 metres (1,610 ft). It flows north and then east, through occasional rapids, receiving the waters from several creeks and lakes. The course becomes meandered before it is crossed by the Mackenzie Highway, where the river turns sharply west, then north. It continues through a 60-metre (200 ft) deep canyon, then empties into the Mackenzie River, 60 kilometres (37 mi) downstream from Jean Marie River and 95 kilometres (59 mi) upstream from Mills Lake, at an elevation of 145 metres (476 ft).

Sambaa Ke (lake) lake in the Northwest Territories, Canada

Sambaa K’e is a lake in the Dehcho Region of the Northwest Territories of Canada. The only settlement on its shores shares the same name; both were officially known as Trout Lake until 2016, when their names were changed to reflect local usage.

Rapids A section of a river where the river bed is relatively steep, increasing the waters velocity and turbulence

Rapids are sections of a river where the river bed has a relatively steep gradient, causing an increase in water velocity and turbulence.

Meander A sinuous bend in a series in the channel of a river

A meander is one of a series of regular sinuous curves, bends, loops, turns, or windings in the channel of a river, stream, or other watercourse. It is produced by a stream or river swinging from side to side as it flows across its floodplain or shifts its channel within a valley. A meander is produced by a stream or river as it erodes the sediments comprising an outer, concave bank and deposits this and other sediment downstream on an inner, convex bank which is typically a point bar. The result of sediments being eroded from the outside concave bank and their deposition on an inside convex bank is the formation of a sinuous course as a channel migrates back and forth across the down-valley axis of a floodplain. The zone within which a meandering stream shifts its channel across either its floodplain or valley floor from time to time is known as a meander belt. It typically ranges from 15 to 18 times the width of the channel. Over time, meanders migrate downstream, sometimes in such a short time as to create civil engineering problems for local municipalities attempting to maintain stable roads and bridges.

See also


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