United States Road Racing Championship

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The United States Road Racing Championship (USRRC) was created by the Sports Car Club of America in 1962. It was the first SCCA series for professional racing drivers. SCCA Executive Director John Bishop helped to create the series to recover races that had been taken by rival USAC Road Racing Championship, a championship that folded after the 1962 season. [1] For its first three seasons, the series featured both open-topped sports cars and GT cars. Ford and Porsche dominated the Over- and Under-2 Liter classes, respectively. The USRRC ran from 1963 until 1968 when it was abandoned in favor of the more successful Can-Am series, which was also run by the SCCA.

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In 1998 the USRRC name was revived by the SCCA as an alternative to the IMSA GT Championship, and revived the Can-Am name for its top class. For 1999 the series reached an agreement with the International Sports Racing Series in Europe, in which the two series would share the same rules for prototypes. Entries for the series were sparse, and the final two rounds were cancelled. At the end of 1999 the series was taken over by the new Grand American Road Racing Association (GARRA), and the championship was reborn as the Grand American Road Racing Championship, known as the Rolex Sports Car Series. In 2014 the Grand American Road Racing Association and American Le Mans Series merged to form the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship

Champions

SeasonDriverGT Makes
1963 Flag of the United States.svg Bob Holbert Flag of the United States.svg AC Cobra
1964 Flag of the United States.svg Jim Hall Flag of the United States.svg Shelby American
1965 Flag of the United States.svg George Follmer
1966 Flag of the United States.svg Chuck Parsons
1967 Flag of the United States.svg Mark Donohue
1968

USRRC champions

SeasonCan-AmGT1GT2GT3
1998 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg James Weaver Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Thierry Boutsen Flag of the United States.svg Scott Sansone
Flag of the United States.svg Cameron Worth
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Ross Bentley
1999 Flag of the United States.svg Elliott Forbes-Robinson
Flag of the United States.svg Butch Leitzinger
no title Flag of the United States.svg Larry Schumacher
Flag of the United States.svg John O'Steen
Flag of the United States.svg Cort Wagner

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References

  1. Gousseau, Alexis (23 April 2006). "A tribute to John Bishop". IMSAblog. Retrieved 29 May 2010.