Waterville Village Historic District

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Waterville Village Historic District
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Location VT 109, Oakes Rd., Church St., Griffin Rd., Fox Hill Rd., Beals Hill Rd., Lapland Rd., Waterville, Vermont
Coordinates 44°41′25″N72°46′10″W / 44.69028°N 72.76944°W / 44.69028; -72.76944 Coordinates: 44°41′25″N72°46′10″W / 44.69028°N 72.76944°W / 44.69028; -72.76944
Area 47 acres (19 ha)
Built 1835 (1835)
Architectural style Greek Revival, Colonial Revival
NRHP reference # 07001026 [1]
Added to NRHP September 28, 2007

The Waterville Village Historic District encompasses most of the history 19th and early 20th-century village center of Waterville, Vermont. The village grew from beginnings late in the 18th century to serve as a modest civic, commercial, and residential hub for the rural community. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2007. [1]

Waterville, Vermont Town in Vermont, United States

Waterville is a town in Lamoille County, Vermont, United States. The population was 697 at the 2000 census.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

The town of Waterville in northern Vermont was settled in the late 18th century and incorporated in 1824. The town center, located in its far south, grew as a linear mill village on the banks of the North Branch Lamoille River. Its first mills were sawmills and gristmills built early in the 19th century, and it was by mid-century a center for the processing of hemp. A textile mill was founded in 1846, which manufactured flannel cloth, but the success of that and other endeavours was cut off by fire. The village's industry declined later in the 19th century because it was bypassed by local railroads, and eventually all of the industrial buildings were lost to demolition or fire. The principal industry in the area is now dairy production. [2]

Lamoille River river in the United States of America

The Lamoille River is a river which runs through northern Vermont and drains into Lake Champlain. It is about 85 miles (137 km) in length, and has a drainage area of around 706 square miles (1,830 km2). The river generally flows southwest, and then northwest, from the water divide of the Green Mountains, and is the namesake of Lamoille County, Vermont. The river's valley also gave its name to the now-defunct Lamoille Valley Railroad Company, successor to the St. Johnsbury and Lamoille County Railroad.

Hemp low-THC Cannabis plant

Hemp, or industrial hemp, typically found in the northern hemisphere, is a strain of the Cannabis sativa plant species that is grown specifically for the industrial uses of its derived products. It is one of the fastest growing plants and was one of the first plants to be spun into usable fiber 10,000 years ago. It can be refined into a variety of commercial items including paper, textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastics, paint, insulation, biofuel, food, and animal feed.

The historic district is centered on the junction of Main Street (Vermont Route 109) and Church Street, also known historically as Bridge Street, because it leads to the covered bridge across the river. It extends west along Bridge Street just across the river to its junction with Griffin Road, and runs north on Main Street to its crossing of the river on a 20th-century steel girder bridge. It extends south as far as Oakes Road. The principal commercial building in the district is at the main junction, where three adjoining buildings now house a single general store. On the east side of the junction is the town hall, a former Universalist church building built in the mid-19th century in the Greek Revival style. There are two other church buildings in the village, including one built in 1911 for a new Nazarene congregation. Most of the residential housing in the district is vernacular and modest in scale, typically 1-1/2 stories in height, and of wood frame construction. [2]

Vermont Route 109

Vermont Route 109 (VT 109) is a 14.800-mile-long (23.818 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Vermont. It begins at VT 108 in the town of Cambridge and ends at VT 118 in Belvidere.

Church Street Covered Bridge

The Church Street Covered Bridge, also called the Village Covered Bridge, is a wooden covered bridge that crosses the North Branch of the Lamoille River in Waterville, Vermont off State Route 109 in Waterville, Vermont. Built in the late 19th century, it is one of five covered bridges in a space of about five miles that cross the North Branch Lamoille. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

See also

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Lamoille County, Vermont.

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