Wauldby

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Wauldby
Wauldby, the cottages - geograph.org.uk - 807264.jpg
Cottages at Wauldby
East Riding of Yorkshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Wauldby
Location within the East Riding of Yorkshire
OS grid reference SE967297
Civil parish
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town BROUGH
Postcode district HU15
Dialling code 01482
Police Humberside
Fire Humberside
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
53°45′17″N0°32′01″W / 53.754684°N 0.533500°W / 53.754684; -0.533500 Coordinates: 53°45′17″N0°32′01″W / 53.754684°N 0.533500°W / 53.754684; -0.533500

Wauldby is a region in the Yorkshire Wolds within the civil parish of Welton in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It contains the gentrified hamlet around Wauldby Manor Farm, and a few other minor dwellings including Little Wauldby Farm.

Yorkshire Wolds mountains in the United Kingdom

The Yorkshire Wolds are low hills in the counties of the East Riding of Yorkshire and North Yorkshire in north-eastern England. The name also applies to the district in which the hills lie.

Welton, East Riding of Yorkshire village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Welton is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The parish extends to the bank of the Humber Estuary at its southern extreme, and into the Yorkshire Wolds in the northern part. The A63 road and Hull to Selby railway line both bisect the parish east-west south of Melton and Welton.

East Riding of Yorkshire County of England

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is an area in Northern England and can refer either to the administrative county of the East Riding of Yorkshire which is a unitary authority, to the ceremonial county (Lieutenancy) of the East Riding of Yorkshire or to the easternmost of the three subdivisions (ridings) of the traditional county of Yorkshire.

Contents

Wauldby was once the site of a village; the habitation was abandoned in mediaeval times.

Geography

Wauldby is situated approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Welton and 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Willerby. It is within the Yorkshire Wolds beyond the head of Welton Dale, at a height of approximately 330 ft (100 m) with a local high point of 381 ft (116 m). The area is entirely rural; there are two minor dwellings: Little Waulby Farm and Waulby Manor Farm with church, manor house outbuildings and cottages, and a pond Wauldby Dam. Most the land is enclosed field system, there are also minor woods and plantations including the Woodland Trust managed Nut Wood and Wauldby Scrogs. [1]

Willerby, East Riding of Yorkshire village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Willerby is a village and civil parish located on the western outskirts of the city of Kingston upon Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

Woodland Trust Woodland conservation charity in the UK

The Woodland Trust is the largest woodland conservation charity in the United Kingdom concerned with the creation, protection, and restoration of native woodland heritage. It has planted over 43 million trees since 1972.

History

Wauldby was recorded in the 11th century Doomsday survey as "Waldbi", with a population, together with Elloughton, of 36 villeins, 3 smallholders and a priest. [2] The name Waldbi is thought to mean "[place] on the wold", and is Scandinavian in origin. [3] [n 1]

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

Elloughton village in the United Kingdom

Elloughton is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 12 miles (19 km) to the west of Hull to the south of the A63 road. It lies on the southern end of the Yorkshire Wolds. It is conjoined with Brough that lies to the south-east, with which it forms the civil parish of Elloughton-cum-Brough.

The original village was depopulated during the mediaeval period. [5] [n 2] [n 3] The area underwent enclosure after 1796. [8] In the 1850s the township of Waulby covered 990 acres (400 ha) and contained 49 people. [9]

Enclosure was the legal process in England of consolidating (enclosing) small landholdings into larger farms since the 13th century. Once enclosed, use of the land became restricted and available only to the owner, and it ceased to be common land for communal use. In England and Wales the term is also used for the process that ended the ancient system of arable farming in open fields. Under enclosure, such land is fenced (enclosed) and deeded or entitled to one or more owners. The process of enclosure began to be a widespread feature of the English agricultural landscape during the 16th century. By the 19th century, unenclosed commons had become largely restricted to rough pasture in mountainous areas and to relatively small parts of the lowlands.

Wauldby Manor Farm Wauldby Manor Farm - geograph.org.uk - 806608.jpg
Wauldby Manor Farm

In 1835 a chapel was built on the site of an older chapel of ease by Anne Raikes the then landowner. [9] [10] [n 4] It was built in Gothic revival 13th century style, and is thought to be designed by J.L. Pearson. [7] [11] [n 3]

Chapel of ease

A chapel of ease is a church building other than the parish church, built within the bounds of a parish for the attendance of those who cannot reach the parish church conveniently.

John Loughborough Pearson British architect

John Loughborough Pearson was a Gothic Revival architect renowned for his work on churches and cathedrals. Pearson revived and practised largely the art of vaulting, and acquired in it a proficiency unrivalled in his generation.

Wauldby Hall, also known as Waulby Manor, was rebuilt in 1839. [9]

The house was refurbished in the 1960s by Francis Johnson. [13] The church's bell cote was removed in 1980, and both the manor and church building became grade II listed buildings in 1988. [11] [14] The house, church and 11.2 acres (4.5 ha) of grounds were put up for sale in 2009 at a price of £1.55 million. [15]

Notes

  1. Etymology: by meaning farmstead or village. [3] The Old Norse völlr (field), the German wald (wood), and the Anglo Saxon weald are words related to the root of the name. [4]
  2. "Deserted medieval villages, (1971), M.W. Beresford et al gives a location SE 974297 ; [6] east of the church, whilst "The Buildings of England: Yorkshire: York and the East Riding, (1972), N. Pevsner" states in a footnote that the site of the deserted village is obvious, and to the south of the Church. [7]
  3. 1 2 In Archaeological Journal (1845. vol.1, p.97); Letter from J.L. Pearson: ..there were once some buildings existing at Wauldby ... I built a small chapel somewhere on the site of the old buildings for Mr. Raikes.. [12]
  4. Pevsner's Buildings of England and other sources give a date of building of 1844. [7] [11]

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References

  1. Ordnance Survey, 1:25000, 2006
  2. Wauldby in the Domesday Book . Retrieved 2 December 2012.
  3. 1 2 Cameron, Kenneth (1961). English Place Names. B.T. Batsford, reproduced: Redwood Press. p. 80.
  4. Holderness, Thomas (1881). Some place-names of the east riding of Yorkshire, a paper. p. 16.
  5. Sources:
    • Heaton, Barry. "A History–After The Romans". www.littleweighton.org.uk. Rowley Parish Council. Retrieved 21 February 2012. .. from aerial photographs we can identify many ancient 'deserted' settlements on the Wolds. Rowley parish has Hunsley, Risby and Riplingham, and Weedley and Wauldby just over our present boundary.
    • Harris, Alan (October 1968). "Some maps of deserted medieval villages in the east riding of Yorkshire". Geographische Zeitschrift . Franz Steiner Verlag. 56 (3): 181–193. JSTOR   27816913.
  6. Beresford, Maurice Warwick; Hurst, John G. (1989) [1971]. Deserted medieval villages: studies. Alan Sutton, orig. Lutterworth Press. p. 209. ISBN   9780862996550.
  7. 1 2 3 Pevsner, Nicholas (1985) [1972]. The Buildings of England: Yorkshire: York and the East Riding. Penguin. Wauldby, p. 361.
  8. Harris, Alan (1958). "The Lost Village and the Landscape of the Yorkshire Wolds". The Agricultural History Review. 6 (2). Footnote 2, p. 97. JSTOR   40262742.
  9. 1 2 3 Sheahan, J. J.; Whellan, T. (1856). History and topography of the city of York; the Ainsty wapentake; and the East riding of Yorkshire. 2. pp. 541–2.
  10. Hall, John George (1892). "Wauldby, p.218". A history of South Cave and of other parishes in the East Riding of the county of York. Edwin Ombler.
  11. 1 2 3 Historic England. "Wauldby Chapel (1281448)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 February 2012.
  12. Hodson, J.F. (1844). "On the difference of plan alleged to exist between churches of Austin canons and those of monks; and the frequency with which such churches were parochial". In The British Archaeological Association (ed.). The Archaeological journal, Volume 1. Longman, Brown, Green and Longman. North Ferriby Priory Church, p.97.
  13. Churchill, Penny (27 March 2009). "Property in the north of England". Country Life. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  14. Historic England. "Manor Farmhouse (1103301)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 February 2012.
  15. "Good manors go a long way . ." This is Hull and East Riding. 19 May 2009. Retrieved 16 December 2012.

Sources

  • Gazetteer AZ of Towns Villages and Hamlets. East Riding of Yorkshire Council. 2006. p. 11.