Waverly Plantation (Cunningham, North Carolina)

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Waverly Plantation
Waverly Plantation House.jpg
Front and western side
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LocationS of U.S. 58, near Cunningham, North Carolina
Coordinates 36°32′20″N79°04′44″W / 36.53889°N 79.07889°W / 36.53889; -79.07889 Coordinates: 36°32′20″N79°04′44″W / 36.53889°N 79.07889°W / 36.53889; -79.07889
Area20 acres (8.1 ha)
Builtc. 1830 (1830)
Built byAlexander Cuningham [sic]
Architectural styleFederal
NRHP reference # 74001369 [1]
Added to NRHPOctober 9, 1974

Waverly Plantation is a historic plantation house located near Cunningham, Person County, North Carolina. It was built about 1830, and is a Late Federal style frame dwelling consisting of a two-story, three bay by two bay main section, with an attached 1 1/2-story, one bay by two bay section. Both sections rest on brick foundations, are sheathed in weatherboard, and have gable roofs. [2]

Person County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Person County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. The population was 39,464 at the 2010 census. The county seat is Roxboro.

Federal architecture architectural style

Federal-style architecture is the name for the classicizing architecture built in the newly founded United States between c. 1780 and 1830, and particularly from 1785 to 1815. This style shares its name with its era, the Federalist Era. The name Federal style is also used in association with furniture design in the United States of the same time period. The style broadly corresponds to the classicism of Biedermeier style in the German-speaking lands, Regency architecture in Britain and to the French Empire style.

The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. Survey and Planning Unit Staff (May 1974). "Waverly Plantation" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-02-01.