We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off

Last updated
"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off"
Take Our Clothes Off.jpg
Single by Jermaine Stewart
from the album Frantic Romantic
B-side "Brilliance"
ReleasedMay 27, 1986
Recorded1985
Genre
Length
  • 4:54(album version)
  • 4:05 (edited single version)
Label
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s) Narada Michael Walden
Jermaine Stewart singles chronology
"I Like It"
(1985)
"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off"
(1986)
"Frantic Romantic" / "Versatile"
(1986)
Music video
”We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off” on YouTube
Alternate cover
JermaineStewartWeDon'tHaveToSingle12"UK1986.jpg
UK 12" cover of "We Don't Have To..."

"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (released in the United Kingdom as "We Don't Have To...") is American R&B vocalist Jermaine Stewart's first of three singles from 1986. The song was included on his second album Frantic Romantic , released that same year. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" remains Stewart's biggest commercial success, peaking at number five on the Billboard Hot 100. Outside of the United States, "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" peaked within the top ten of the charts in Canada, the Republic of Ireland, and the United Kingdom.

Contents

Background

"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" was written by producer, drummer, and singer-songwriter Narada Michael Walden and Preston Glass. Stewart recorded it during 1985 and it was released across the world the following summer, peaking at number five on the Billboard Hot 100, and also peaking within the top ten of the charts in Canada, the Republic of Ireland, and the United Kingdom.

The single seemed to reflect more modesty regarding sex due to the AIDS pandemic at the time. When interviewed by Donnie Simpson in 1988, Stewart spoke of the lyrical message within the song. "I think it made a lot of peoples' minds open up a little bit. We didn't only want to just talk about clothes, we wanted to extend that. We wanted to use the song as a theme to be able to say you don't have to do all the negative things that society forces on you. You don't have to drink and drive. You don't have to take drugs early. The girls don't have to get pregnant early. So the clothes bit of it was to get people's attention, which it did and I'm glad it was a positive message." [1] [2]

The song reignited Stewart's popularity, as his previous single, "I Like It" had failed to make much impact as a follow-up to Stewart's moderately successful debut single, "The Word Is Out" ("I Like It" did not chart in either the US or the United Kingdom).

Promotion

A popular promotional video, directed by David Fincher, was created for the single as well as numerous TV performances to promote the single, including stints on Soul Train and American Bandstand .

Legacy

In 2011, the song was used in a Cadbury's TV commercial in the United Kingdom, called The Charity Shop. [3] This exposed the song to a new generation who downloaded the track and returned it to the UK Singles Chart, peaking at number 29. The song also appeared in Kevin Smith's film Zack and Miri Make a Porno , the episode "My Dirty Secret" of the television show Scrubs and the first episode of the second series of the comedy show Peter Kay's Car Share.

The song has been covered a number of times and versions have been released by British girl group Clea, Lil' Chris, Maria José Samper and Ella Eyre, while it also provided the hook for Gym Class Heroes' fifth single "Clothes Off!!" and was sampled by rapper Mase on his album Welcome Back .

Release

The B-side for the European single "Brilliance" appeared on Stewart's 1984 debut album The Word Is Out as the final track. "Brilliance" was written by Stewart and Julian Lindsay. [4] Lindsay had previously performed piano on the 1983 Culture Club album Colour by Numbers , which also featured Stewart on backing vocals.

The American b-side was "Give Your Love to Me" which was used as the closing track on the album Frantic Romantic . It was written by Jakko J. and Jermaine Stewart.

For the single, various remixes of "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" were released. These remixes were created by Lewis A. Martineé, who would soon go on to success as svengali for the Latin freestyle group, Exposé. A special UK/Australian 12" single was released titled "We Don't Have To..." which featured different artwork.

Formats

7" single (American release)

  1. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" – 3:57
  2. "Give Your Love to Me" – 4:20

7" single (Canadian release)

  1. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (short version) – 4:05
  2. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (dub mix) – 6:40

7" single (European release)

  1. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" – 4:05
  2. "Brilliance" – 4:43

7" single (UK and Australian release)

  1. "We Don't Have To..." – 4:05
  2. "Brilliance" – 4:43

12" single (American and Canadian release)

  1. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (dance remix) – 5:45
  2. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (dub) – 6:40
  3. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (short version) – 4:05

12" single (European release)

  1. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (extended) – 5:45
  2. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" – 4:05
  3. "Brilliance" – 4:43

12" single (UK release)

  1. "We Don't Have To..." (extended version) – 5:45
  2. "We Don't Have To..." – 4:05
  3. "Brilliance" – 4:43

Chart performance

Original release

Chart (198687)Peak
position
Australia (Kent Music Report) [5] 37
Canadian Singles Chart [6] 2
Dutch Singles Chart [7] 13
French Singles Chart [8] 91
Irish Singles Chart [9] 4
New Zealand Singles Chart [10] 27
UK Singles Chart [11] 2
US Billboard Hot 100 [12] 5
US Billboard R&B/Hip-Hop Songs Chart [13] 64
US Billboard Dance/Club Play Songs Chart [14] 41
US Billboard Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales Chart [15] 35
Year-end chart (1986)Rank
US Top Pop Singles (Billboard) [16] 60

2011 reissue

Chart (2011)Peak
position
Irish Singles Chart [9] 30
UK Singles Chart [11] 29
UK R&B Singles Chart [17] 7

Personnel

Album version

Taken from the Frantic Romantic liner notes. [18]

Additional personnel on single release

Clea version

"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off"
Take Our Clothes Off Clea.jpg
Single by Clea vs. Da Playaz
from the album Trinity
ReleasedSeptember 2005 (UK)
2006 (Europe)
Genre
Label Upside Records
Songwriter(s)
Clea vs. Da Playaz singles chronology
"Stuck in the Middle"
(2004)
"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off"
(2005)
"Lucky Like That"
(2006)

The song was covered by Clea and was released as their third single. It was released in the UK in September 2005 and giving them their third Top 40 hit, charting at number 35. The song appears on their UK debut album, Trinity .

Charts

Chart (2005)Peak
position
UK Singles Chart 35

Lil' Chris version

"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off"
Clothes Off.jpg
Single by Lil' Chris
from the album What's It All About
ReleasedOctober 2007 (UK)
Genre Pop
Label RCA
Songwriter(s)
Lil' Chris singles chronology
"Figure It Out"
(2007)
"We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off"
(2007)

Lil' Chris covered the song and released it as the only single from his second album, What's It All About?, on 19 October 2007. It peaked at number 63 on the UK Singles Chart. This was his last single before his death in 2015.

Track listing

CD single

  1. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" – 3:04
  2. "Taste Me" (live in Manchester)
  3. "I Never Noticed" (Live in London)

7" vinyl

  1. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" – 3:04
  2. "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off" (Media Virus Remix) – 5:53

Charts

Chart (2007)Peak
position
UK Singles Chart 63

Other performances

Related Research Articles

<i>Whitney Houston</i> (album) 1985 studio album by Whitney Houston

Whitney Houston is the self-titled debut studio album by American singer Whitney Houston. It was released on February 14, 1985, by Arista Records. The album initially had a slow commercial response, but began getting more popular in the summer of 1985. It eventually topped the Billboard 200 for 14 weeks in 1986, generating three number-one singles—"Saving All My Love for You", "How Will I Know" and "Greatest Love of All" —on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, which made it both the first debut album and the first album by a solo female artist to produce three number-one singles.

<i>Mariah Carey</i> (album) 1990 studio album by Mariah Carey

Mariah Carey is the self-titled debut studio album by American singer-songwriter and record producer Mariah Carey, released on June 12, 1990, by Columbia Records. Its music incorporates a range of contemporary genres with a mix of slow ballads and up-tempo tracks. Originally, Carey wrote four songs with Ben Margulies, which solely constituted her demo tape. After Carey was signed to Columbia, all four songs, after being altered and partially re-recorded, made the final cut for the album. Aside from Margulies, Carey worked with a range of professional writers and producers, all of whom were hired by Columbia CEO, Tommy Mottola. Mariah Carey featured production and writing from Rhett Lawrence, Ric Wake and Narada Michael Walden, all of whom were top record producers at the time. Together with Carey, they conceived the album and reconstructed her original demo tape.

Narada Michael Walden American musician

Narada Michael Walden is an American singer, songwriter, musician, and record producer. He acquired the nickname Narada from Sri Chinmoy. In 2020, he became the drummer for Journey, replacing Steve Smith. In 2021, he became one of two drummers in the band alongside the returning Deen Castronovo.

Clea was an English girl group whose members met on the television show Popstars: The Rivals in 2002. Chloe Morgan, Lynsey Brown, Emma Beard, and Aimee Kearsley, decided to form a band after they were voted off the series. The name 'Clea' is an acronym of the first letter of each member's name.

I Dont Wanna Cry 1991 single by Mariah Carey

"I Don't Wanna Cry" is a song written by Mariah Carey and Narada Michael Walden, and produced by Walden for Carey's debut album, Mariah Carey (1990). The ballad was released as the album's fourth single in the second quarter of 1991. It became Carey's fourth number one single on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

So Emotional 1987 single by Whitney Houston

"So Emotional" is a song by American singer Whitney Houston. It was released as the third single from her second studio album Whitney (1987) on October 12, 1987 by Arista Records. The song was written by Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly. It was also the last song Steinberg and Kelly wrote together.

Jermaine Stewart American singer

William Jermaine Stewart was an American R&B singer best known for his 1986 hit single "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off", which peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100, and also peaked within the top ten of the charts in Canada at number, the Republic of Ireland, and the United Kingdom.

<i>As Cruel as School Children</i> 2006 studio album by Gym Class Heroes

As Cruel as School Children is the third studio album by Gym Class Heroes. It was released on July 25, 2006. It was produced by Fall Out Boy's Patrick Stump. A second version of the album, released on November 4, 2006 additionally contains the single "Cupid's Chokehold". Both versions of these albums have the Parental Advisory sticker on them. As Cruel as School Children shows a significant departure from the style of their previous work such as the use of drum machine, Acoustic Guitar, Synthesizers and the band dabbling in many genres such as Electronica, Funk and Soul. Since its release, it has been certified gold by the RIAA. The name of the album is a lyric from "Scandalous Scholastics", which is a track on the album. The band re-released this album, which includes the new remix of "Cupid's Chokehold".

<i>Trinity</i> (Clea album) 2006 studio album by Clea

Trinity is an album by the British group Clea. It was the first release following the departure of member Chloe Staines. Trinity, Clea's second album was released on 3 July 2006 on Upside Records.

<i>Take Me Higher</i> 1995 studio album by Diana Ross

Take Me Higher is the twenty-first studio album by American singer Diana Ross, released on September 5, 1995 by Motown Records. Ross' first regular studio release in four years, following The Force Behind the Power (1991) and the holiday album A Very Special Season (1994), the album features production from urban producers such as Narada Michael Walden, Mike Mani, Louis Biancaniello, Jon-John and the Babyface protégés, The Boom Brothers.

Clothes Off!! 2007 single by Gym Class Heroes

"Clothes Off!!" is the fifth single from Gym Class Heroes' third album, As Cruel as School Children. It features vocalist Patrick Stump of Fall Out Boy. It was released in June 2007, and peaked at number 46 on the Billboard Hot 100. Outside of the United States, "Clothes Off" peaked within the top ten of the charts in Finland, the Republic of Ireland, and the United Kingdom.

<i>Frantic Romantic</i> 1986 studio album by Jermaine Stewart

Frantic Romantic is the second album by American R&B singer Jermaine Stewart, released in 1986. The album includes Stewart's biggest pop hit, "We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off", as well as the minor follow-up hit, "Jody", for whom Stewart's former Soul Train dance-mate Jody Watley was the inspiration. The album was re-issued on CD on October 18, 2010 by Cherry Red in the UK.

What You Dont Know (Exposé song) 1989 single by Exposé

"What You Don't Know" is a song recorded by American Latin freestyle vocal group Exposé for their 1989 second studio album of the same name. Written and produced by the group's founder Lewis A. Martineé, the lead vocals on "What You Don't Know" were performed by Gioia Bruno.

Don't Take It Personal is a studio album by the American singer Jermaine Jackson, released in 1989. The title track became his second and final US R&B #1 single, and was followed by two more top 30 US R&B hits, "I'd Like to Get to Know You" and "Two Ships".

Every Woman Wants To 1990 single by Jermaine Stewart

"Every Woman Wants To" is a song by American singer Jermaine Stewart, released as the second and final single in 1990 from his fourth studio album What Becomes a Legend Most. It was written by Richard C. Scher and Dorothy Sea Gazeley, and produced by Scher.

"Say It Again" is a song written by Bunny Sigler and Carol Davis. It was originally recorded and released as a single by African-American singer Shawn Christopher in 1983. In 1984, American singer Lou Rawls recorded a version for his album Close Company. In 1985, Rége Burrell released his own version of the song as a single from his album Victim of Emotion. In 1986, American female R&B vocal trio Sinnamon recorded their own version, which was released as a single. The best known version is the 1987 recording by American singer Jermaine Stewart, released as a hit single from his album of the same name.

Dont Ever Leave Me (song) 1986 single by Jermaine Stewart

"Don't Ever Leave Me" is a song by American singer Jermaine Stewart, which was released as the fourth and final single from his 1986 album Frantic Romantic. The song was written by Stewart, Jeffrey Cohen and Narada Michael Walden, and produced by Walden.

Jody (song) 1986 single by Jermaine Stewart

"Jody" is a song by American singer Jermaine Stewart, released in 1986 as the third single from his album Frantic Romantic. It was written by Stewart, Narada Michael Walden and Jeffrey Cohen, and produced by Walden.

Premik Russell Tubbs is an American saxophonist, songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist.

<i>Divine Emotion</i> 1988 studio album by Narada Michael Walden

Divine Emotion is the ninth studio album by American singer, songwriter, musician and record producer Narada Michael Walden. It was released in 1988. The album includes the single "Divine Emotions", which reached number one on the US Dance Club Songs chart, number 21 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and number eight in the UK Singles Chart. Two other singles were released from the album: "Can't Get You Outta My Head" and "Wild Thing".

References

  1. "In Memory Of Jermaine Stewart - 1988 Interview With Donnie Simpson". Jermainestewart.org. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  2. Easley, Terri (August 2008). Seasons of Destiny. Xulon Press. p. 123. ISBN   978-1-60647-152-4.
  3. "Cadbury advert The Charity Shop". YouTube . 6 May 2011.
  4. "Jermaine Stewart - We Don't Have To Take Our Clothes Off (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  5. Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. p. 294. ISBN   0-646-11917-6.
  6. "Results - RPM - Library and Archives Canada". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  7. Steffen Hung. "Jermaine Stewart - We Don't Have To Take Our Clothes Off". dutchcharts.nl. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  8. "InfoDisc : Tout les Titres par Artiste". Infodisc.fr. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  9. 1 2 Jaclyn Ward - Fireball Media Group. "The Irish Charts - All there is to know". Irishcharts.ie. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  10. Steffen Hung. "Jermaine Stewart - We Don't Have To Take Our Clothes Off". charts.nz. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  11. 1 2 "UK Singles & Albums Official Charts Company". Official Charts Company . Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  12. "Jermaine Stewart - Chart history". Billboard. Retrieved 2015-02-20.
  13. "Jermaine Stewart - Chart history". Billboard. Retrieved 2015-02-20.
  14. "Jermaine Stewart - Chart history". Billboard. Retrieved 2015-02-20.
  15. "Jermaine Stewart". AllMusic. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  16. Nielsen Business Media, Inc (December 27, 1986). "1986 The Year in Music & Video: Top Pop Singles". Billboard. 98 (52): Y-21.
  17. "2011-05-28 Top 40 R&B Singles Archive". Official Charts Company. 2011-05-28. Retrieved 2012-01-12.
  18. Jermaine Stewart - Frantic Romantic album back cover/liner notes.
  19. Snapshot24: Golden Buzzer Singer Calum Scott Stunned the Crowd with Amazing Rendition of “We Don't Have to Take Our Clothes Off”