Winnipeg (provincial electoral district)

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Winnipeg was a provincial electoral district in the Canadian province of Manitoba, which was represented in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. Consisting of the city of Winnipeg, the district originally existed from 1870 to 1883, returning a single member to the assembly. The district was named Winnipeg and St. John for the election of 1870 only, and Winnipeg thereafter.

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In 1883, it was divided into the new districts of Winnipeg North and Winnipeg South; a third district of Winnipeg Centre was created in 1888.

In 1920, the district was reconstituted as a multiple member district, which returned ten members to the legislature who were all elected citywide under the Hare quota form of single transferable vote. [1] The district existed in this form until 1949, when the city was divided again into the three districts of Winnipeg North, South and Centre. Each of the three districts continued to use STV. They each elected four members until 1958, when all districts in the province reverted to conventional first-past-the-post voting. [1]

List of representatives (1870-1883)

NamePartyTook OfficeLeft Office
Donald Smith Government18701873
Robert Davis Opposition18731878
Thomas Scott Opposition18781879
Conservative 18781882

Elected MLAs during Winnipeg's 10-member period (1920-1949)

NameParty 1920 1922 1927 1932 1936 1941 1945
  George Armstrong Socialist Yes check.svgY
  Paul Bardal Liberal-Progressive Yes check.svgY
  James Alexander Barry Conservative Yes check.svgY
  Duncan Cameron Liberal Yes check.svgY
  Richard Craig United Farmers Yes check.svgY
  Fred Dixon Labour Yes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  John K. Downes IndependentYes check.svgY
  William Sanford Evans Conservative Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Seymour Farmer Independent Labour Party Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Morris Gray CCF Yes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  John Thomas Haig Conservative Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Marcus Hyman Independent Labour Yes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  William Ivens Labour Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Robert Jacob Liberal Yes check.svgY
  Thomas Herman Johnson Liberal Yes check.svgY
  Bill Kardash Communist Anti-coalitionYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Huntly Ketchen Conservative Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Stephen Krawchyk Independent CoalitionYes check.svgY
  James Litterick Communist Yes check.svgY
  William Major Progressive Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Ralph Maybank Liberal-Progressive Yes check.svgY
  John Stewart McDiarmid Liberal-Progressive Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Edward William Montgomery Progressive Yes check.svgY
  John Queen Social Democrat Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Hugh Robson Liberal Yes check.svgY
  Edith Rogers Liberal Yes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  William Scraba Liberal-Progressive Yes check.svgY
  Charles Rhodes Smith Liberal-Progressive Yes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Lloyd Stinson CCF Yes check.svgY
  John Stovel Liberal Yes check.svgY
  Lewis Stubbs IndependentYes check.svgYYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  Donovan Swailes CCF Yes check.svgY
  Gunnar Thorvaldson Conservative Yes check.svgYYes check.svgY
  William Tobias Conservative Yes check.svgY
  William J. Tupper Conservative Yes check.svgY
  Ralph Webb Conservative Yes check.svgY

Election results

1870 general election

1870 Manitoba general election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Government Donald Smith 7052.63
Opposition John Christian Schultz 6347.37
Total valid votes133
RejectedN/A
Eligible voters / TurnoutN/A
Source(s)
Source: Manitoba. Chief Electoral Officer (1999). Statement of Votes for the 37th Provincial General Election, September 21, 1999 (PDF) (Report). Winnipeg: Elections Manitoba.

1874 by-election

Manitoba provincial by-election, 1874
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Opposition Robert Atkinson Davis Acclaimed
Total valid votes
RejectedN/A
Eligible voters / TurnoutN/A
Source(s)
Source: Manitoba. Chief Electoral Officer (1999). Statement of Votes for the 37th Provincial General Election, September 21, 2000 (PDF) (Report). Winnipeg: Elections Manitoba.

1874 general election

1874 Manitoba general election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Government Robert Atkinson Davis 19851.97
Undeclared Thomas Scott 18348.03
Total valid votes381
RejectedN/A
Eligible voters / Turnout59963.61
Source(s)
Source: Manitoba. Chief Electoral Officer (1999). Statement of Votes for the 37th Provincial General Election, September 21, 2000 (PDF) (Report). Winnipeg: Elections Manitoba.

1878 general election

1878 Manitoba general election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Undeclared Thomas Scott 27393.4945.46
UndeclaredW. A. Loucks196.51
Total valid votes292
RejectedN/A
Eligible voters / Turnout1,22623.82
Source(s)
Source: Manitoba. Chief Electoral Officer (1999). Statement of Votes for the 37th Provincial General Election, September 21, 2004 (PDF) (Report). Winnipeg: Elections Manitoba.

1879 general election

1879 Manitoba general election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Scott 38754.66-38.83
Undeclared Daniel Hunter McMillan 32145.34
Total valid votes708
RejectedN/A
Eligible voters / TurnoutN/A
Source(s)
Source: Manitoba. Chief Electoral Officer (1999). Statement of Votes for the 37th Provincial General Election, September 21, 2005 (PDF) (Report). Winnipeg: Elections Manitoba.

1880 by-election

Manitoba provincial by-election, 1880
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unknown Daniel Hunter McMillan 43761.3816.04
Unknown Hector Mansfield Howell 14620.51
UnknownD. B. Woodworth12918.12
Total valid votes712
RejectedN/A
Eligible voters / TurnoutN/A
Source(s)
Source: Manitoba. Chief Electoral Officer (1999). Statement of Votes for the 37th Provincial General Election, September 21, 2008 (PDF) (Report). Winnipeg: Elections Manitoba.

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References

  1. 1 2 Patrick Boyer, Direct Democracy in Canada: The History and Future of Referendums. Dundurn Press, 1996. ISBN   9781459718845. p. 95.

See also List of Manitoba general elections