2027 FIFA Women's World Cup

Last updated

2027 FIFA Women's World Cup
Tournament details
Host countryTBA
DatesJune – July (expected)
Teams32 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)TBA (in TBA host cities)
2023
2031

The 2027 FIFA Women's World Cup will be the 10th edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football championship contested by the national teams of the member associations of FIFA. The tournament will involve 32 national teams, including that of the host nation, after FIFA announced the expansion of the tournament in July 2019. [1]

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Contents

Host selection

The bidding process has not started yet, but there are some proposed bids for the World Cup.

Nordic nations

The Nordic nations (Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) have expressed interest in a combined bid to host the World Cup with a statement from Norwegian Football Association president Terje Svendsen saying "We have a good Nordic co-operation and the Nordic countries have a leading position in women's football." The only Nordic nation that has previously hosted a Women's World Cup is Sweden, which did so in 1995. [2]

1995 FIFA Womens World Cup 1995 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

Netherlands

The Dutch government declare an interest in hosting the tournament after a successful UEFA Women's Euro 2017 which saw the Dutch win the tournament. The Netherlands have never hosted a World Cup. [3]

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 2017 edition of the UEFA Womens Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams.

United States

Carlos Cordeiro, who was elected president of the United States Soccer Federation in 2018, expressed an interest in having the U.S. host the tournament as a part of his campaign platform, stating "I believe we can and should host the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2027." [4] If successful, this would see the U.S. hosting the Women's World Cup one year after co-hosting the 2026 FIFA World Cup and one year before Los Angeles hosts the 2028 Summer Olympics. [5] The United States would be the first nation to host the Women's World Cup three times, having previously done so in 1999 and 2003; the 1999 edition set a record for highest average attendance, with the final between the host team and China at the Rose Bowl still ranking as the most-attended women's sporting event in history.

Carlos Cordeiro is an American soccer administrator who is currently the president of the United States Soccer Federation (USSF). On February 10, 2018, Cordeiro won the first contested election for the USSF presidency since 1998.

United States Soccer Federation official governing body of soccer in the United States

The United States Soccer Federation (USSF), commonly referred to as U.S. Soccer, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and the official governing body of the sport of soccer in the United States. With headquarters in Chicago, the FIFA member governs U.S. amateur and professional soccer, including the men's, women's, youth, beach soccer, futsal, and Paralympic national teams. U.S. Soccer sanctions referees and soccer tournaments for most soccer leagues in the United States. The U.S. Soccer Federation also administers and operates the U.S. Open Cup, which was first held in 1914.

2026 FIFA World Cup 23rd FIFA World Cup

The 2026 FIFA World Cup will be the 23rd FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international men's football championship contested by the national teams of the member associations of FIFA. The tournament will be jointly hosted by 16 cities in three North American countries; 60 matches, including the quarterfinals, semi-finals, and the final, will be hosted by the United States while neighboring Canada and Mexico will each host 10 matches. The tournament will be the first hosted by three nations.

Chile

After the Chileans' participation in the 2019 Women's World Cup in France, their sports minister Pauline Kantor, announced the intention to organize the competition for 2027, saying "Particularly, yes. Absolutely. It is a dream for all the development that implies. The World Cup is not just an event. The World Cup also leaves infrastructure and leaves interest. I believe that a Women's World Cup would leave an interest in all the girls, who continue and do it, but who could see themselves even more identified with their referents." Chile will host the 2023 Pan American Games in Santiago. [6]

2019 FIFA Womens World Cup 2019 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

2023 Pan American Games

The 2023 Pan American Games, officially the XIX Pan American Games, will be the 19th edition of the Pan American Games and an international multi-sport event scheduled to be held from October 22 to November 5, 2023 in Santiago, Chile.

Santiago Place in Santiago Metropolitan Region, Chile

Santiago, also known as Santiago de Chile, is the capital and largest city of Chile as well as one of the largest cities in the Americas. It is the center of Chile's largest and most densely populated conurbation, the Santiago Metropolitan Region, whose total population is 7 million. The city is entirely located in the country's central valley. Most of the city lies between 500 m (1,640 ft) and 650 m (2,133 ft) above mean sea level.

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FIFA World Cup Association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

1999 FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

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United States womens national soccer team Womens national association football team representing the United States

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Mexico national football team mens national association football team representing Mexico

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References

  1. "FIFA Council unanimously approves expanded 32-team field for FIFA Women's World Cup". FIFA. 31 July 2019. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  2. "Women's World Cup 2027: Nordic Nations target joint bid". BBC. 22 February 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  3. "Dutch want to host 2027 women's World Cup in wake of Leeuwinnen success". Dutch News. 19 November 2018. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  4. Yang, Stephanie (7 November 2017). "What US Soccer presidential candidates are saying about the women's game". SB Nation . Retrieved 10 June 2019.
  5. Goff, Steven (13 June 2018). "U.S., Mexico and Canada win joint bid for 2026 World Cup, topping Morocco in FIFA vote". Denver Post . Retrieved 10 June 2019.
  6. "Un nuevo sueño: el Mundial femenino 2027" [A new dream: the Women's World Cup 2027] (in Spanish). La Tercera. 27 June 2019. Retrieved 27 June 2019.