24 Views of Mt. Fuji, by Hokusai

Last updated
24 Views of Mt. Fuji, by Hokusai
24 Views Zelazny.jpg
Author Roger Zelazny
Genre Science fiction
Publisher Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine
Publication date
1985

"24 Views of Mt. Fuji, by Hokusai " is a science fiction novella by American writer Roger Zelazny. It won the Hugo Award for Best Novella in 1986 and was also nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novella in 1985.

Science fiction genre of fiction

Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, space exploration, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas".

Roger Zelazny American speculative fiction writer

Roger Joseph Zelazny was an American poet and writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels, best known for The Chronicles of Amber. He won the Nebula award three times and the Hugo award six times, including two Hugos for novels: the serialized novel ...And Call Me Conrad (1965), subsequently published under the title This Immortal (1966) and then the novel Lord of Light (1967).

The Hugo Award for Best Novella is one of the Hugo Awards given each year for science fiction or fantasy stories published or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The novella award is available for works of fiction of between 17,500 and 40,000 words; awards are also given out in the short story, novelette and novel categories. The Hugo Awards have been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".

The novella was partly inspired by Hokusai’s Views of Mt. Fuji (Charles Tuttle, 1965), a book that contains precisely 24 prints painted by Hokusai. In Zelazny's version, the character Mari consults that very book during the story. (Hokusai painted more than 100 images of Mt. Fuji but he is best known for another selection of them: Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji .)

Hokusai Japanese artist

Katsushika Hokusai was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period. Born in Edo, Hokusai is best known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji which includes the internationally iconic print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa.

<i>Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji</i> woodblock printing series by Katsushika Hokusai

Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji is a series of landscape prints by the Japanese ukiyo-e artist Hokusai (1760–1849). The series depicts Mount Fuji from different locations and in various seasons and weather conditions. Despite its name, it actually consists of 46 prints, with 10 of them being added after the initial publication.

Plot summary

A widow makes a pilgrimage in Japan to some of the locations of Hokusai's views of Mt. Fuji, ultimately attempting to confront her former husband who had become a nearly all-powerful digital being.

Mount Fuji Volcano in Yamanashi and Shizuoka Prefectures, Japan

Mount Fuji, located on Honshū, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft), 2nd-highest peak of an island (volcanic) in Asia, and 7th-highest peak of an island in the world. It is a dormant stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–1708. Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometers (60 mi) south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped for about 5 months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing and there is support within both Wikipedia and ISFDB for interlinking. The data are reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.


Related Research Articles

<i>Frost & Fire</i> collection of short stories and essays

Frost & Fire is a 288-page collection of short stories and essays by Roger Zelazny. It was printed in 1989 by William Morrow.

<i>Damnation Alley</i> science fiction novel by Roger Zelazny

Damnation Alley is a 1969 science fiction novel by American writer Roger Zelazny, based on a novella published in 1967. A film adaptation of the novel was released in 1977.

Hōei eruption of Mount Fuji volcanic eruption

The Hōei eruption of Mount Fuji started on 16 December 1707 and ended about 1 January 1708 during the Edo period. Today the crater of the main eruption can be visited from the Fujinomiya or Gotemba Trails on Mount Fuji. Hokusai's One Hundred Views of Mount Fuji includes an image of the small crater at a secondary eruption site on the southwestern slope. This was called Mount Hōei, because the eruption occurred in the fourth year of Hōei.

<i>The Great Wave off Kanagawa</i> many original impressions of woodblock prints by Katsushika Hokusai

The Great Wave off Kanagawa "かながわ-おき なみ うら", also known as The Great Wave or simply The Wave, is a woodblock print by the Japanese ukiyo-e artist Hokusai. It was published sometime between 1829 and 1833 in the late Edo period as the first print in Hokusai's series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji. It is Hokusai's most famous work, and one of the most recognizable works of Japanese art in the world.

The 40th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Chicon IV, was held September 2–6, 1982, at the Hyatt Regency Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, United States.

The 44th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as ConFederation, was held August 28 through September 1, 1986, at the Marriott Marquis and Atlanta Hilton in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The convention was co-chaired by Penny Frierson and Ron Zukowski. Total attendance for the convention was reported as 5,811 members.

The 45th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Conspiracy '87, was held 27 August–1 September 1987 at the Metropole Hotel and The Brighton Centre in Brighton, England.

<i>The Last Defender of Camelot</i> (2002 book) book by Roger Zelazny

The Last Defender of Camelot is a collection of short stories written by science fiction writer Roger Zelazny. It was published by Ibooks, Inc in 2002 and has an identical title to an earlier collection.

The New Hugo Winners was a series of books which collected science fiction and fantasy short-form works that had recently won a Hugo Award for best Short Story, Novelette or Novella. Published by Baen Books, the series succeeded Doubleday's The Hugo Winners following that series' discontinuation after volume five. The New Hugo Winners ran for four volumes, published in 1989, 1992, 1994, and 1997, together collecting stories that had won the award from 1983 to 1994. The first two volumes were edited by Isaac Asimov. Due to Asimov's death in April 1992, the third volume was edited by Connie Willis and the fourth by Greg Benford.

<i>The 1987 Annual Worlds Best SF</i> book by Donald A. Wollheim

The 1987 Annual World's Best SF is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Arthur W. Saha, the fourteenth volume in a series of nineteen. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in June 1987, followed by a hardcover edition issued in July of the same year by the same publisher as a selection of the Science Fiction Book Club. For the hardcover edition the original cover art by Tony Roberts was replaced by a new cover painting by Richard Powers.

<i>Worlds Best Science Fiction: 1967</i> book by Donald A. Wollheim

World's Best Science Fiction: 1967 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the third volume in a series of seven. It was first published in paperback by Ace Books in 1967. It was reprinted by the same publisher in 1970 under the alternate title World's Best Science Fiction: Third Series.

<i>Worlds Best Science Fiction: 1968</i> book by Donald A. Wollheim

World's Best Science Fiction: 1968 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the fourth volume in a series of seven. It was first published in paperback by Ace Books in 1968. It was reprinted by the same publisher in 1970 under the alternate title World's Best Science Fiction: Fourth Series. The first hardcover edition was published by Gollancz in 1969.

<i>The Best Science Fiction of the Year 11</i> book by Terry Carr

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #11 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the eleventh volume in a series of sixteen. It was first published in paperback by Pocket Books in July 1982, and in hardcover by Gollancz in the same year.

<i>Fine Wind, Clear Morning</i> wood block print by Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai

Fine Wind, Clear Morning, also known as South Wind, Clear Sky or Red Fuji, is a wood block print by Japanese artist Hokusai (1760–1849), part of his Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, dating from c. 1830 to 1832. The work has been described as "one of the simplest and at the same time one of the most outstanding of all Japanese prints".

<i>Nebula Award Stories 11</i>

Nebula Award Stories 11 is an anthology of science fiction short works edited by Ursula K. Le Guin. It was first published in the United Kingdom in hardcover by Gollancz in November 1976. The first American edition was published in hardcover by Harper & Row in February 1977. Paperback editions followed from Corgi in the U.K. in July 1978, and Bantam Books in the U.S. in August 1978. The American editions bore the variant title Nebula Award Stories Eleven.

<i>Nebula Award Stories 3</i>

Nebula Award Stories 3 is an anthology of award-winning science fiction short works edited by Roger Zelazny. It was first published in the United Kingdom in hardcover by Gollancz in November 1968. The first American edition was published by Doubleday in December of the same year. Paperback editions followed from Pocket Books in the U.S. in February 1970, and Panther in the U.K. in November 1970. The American editions bore the variant title Nebula Award Stories Three. The book was more recently reissued by Stealth Press in hardcover in June 2001. It has also been published in German.

<i>Nebula Award Stories 1965</i>

Nebula Award Stories 1965 is an anthology of science fiction short works edited by Damon Knight. It was first published in hardcover by Doubleday in 1966, with a Science Fiction Book Club edition following in October of the same year. The first British edition was published by Gollancz in 1967. Paperback editions followed from Pocket Books in the U.S. in November 1967, and New English Library in the U.K. in April 1969. The U.K. and paperback editions bore the variant title Nebula Award Stories 1. The book was more recently reissued by Stealth Press in hardcover in February 2001. It has also been published in German.