Charles Stross

Last updated

Charles Stross
2017-12-27 Charles Stross 7627 small.jpg
Stross in 2017 at 34c3 in Leipzig, Germany
Born (1964-10-18) 18 October 1964 (age 55) [1]
Leeds, England
OccupationWriter, former programmer and pharmacist
Alma mater University of Bradford [2]
Period1990s–present
GenreScience fiction, fantasy, horror
Website
www.antipope.org/charlie/

Charles David George "Charlie" Stross (born 18 October 1964 [1] ) is a British writer of science fiction and fantasy. Stross specialises in hard science fiction and space opera. Between 1994 and 2004, he was also an active writer for the magazine Computer Shopper and was responsible for the monthly Linux column. He stopped writing for the magazine to devote more time to novels. However, he continues to publish freelance articles on the Internet. [3]

Contents

Early life and education

Stross was born in Leeds, England. [4] He showed an early interest in writing and wrote his first science fiction story at age 12. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in Pharmacy in 1986 and qualified as a pharmacist in 1987. In 1989, he enrolled at Bradford University for a post-graduate degree in computer science. In 1990, he went to work as a technical author and programmer. In 2000, he began working as a writer full-time, as a technical writer at first, but then became successful as a fiction writer. [5] [6]

Career

In the 1970s and 1980s, Stross published some role-playing game articles about Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in White Dwarf magazine. Some of his creatures, such as the death knight, githyanki (the name borrowed from George R. R. Martin's book, Dying of the Light ), githzerai, and slaad (a chaotic race of frog-like humanoids) were later published in the Fiend Folio monster compendium. [7]

His first published short story, "The Boys", appeared in Interzone in 1987. A collection of his short stories, Toast: And Other Rusted Futures , was released in 2002; subsequent short stories have been nominated for the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, and other awards. His first novel, Singularity Sky , was published by Ace Books in 2003 and was also nominated for the Hugo Award. His novella "The Concrete Jungle" (published in The Atrocity Archives ) won the Hugo award for its category in 2005. [8] His novel Accelerando won the 2006 Locus Award for best science fiction novel, was a finalist for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel, [9] and was on the final ballot for the Hugo Award in the best novel category. [10] Glasshouse won the 2007 Prometheus Award and was on the final ballot for the Hugo Award in the best novel category; the German translation Glashaus won the 2009 Kurd-Laßwitz-Preis. [11] His novella "Missile Gap" won the 2007 Locus Award for best novella, and most recently he was awarded the Edward E. Smith Memorial Award or Skylark at Boskone 2008.

His novel The Atrocity Archives (2004) focused on a British intelligence agency investigating Mythos-like horrors; using ideas similar to those in the RPG book Delta Green (1996), Stross commented in an afterword to the book: "All I can say in my defence is... I hadn't heard of Delta Green when I wrote The Atrocity Archive... I'll leave it at that except to say that Delta Green has come dangerously close to making me pick up the dice again." [12] :247

"Rogue Farm," his 2003 short story, was adapted into an eponymous animated film that debuted in August 2004. [13]

Stross was one of the Guests of Honour at Orbital 2008, [14] the British National Science Fiction convention (Eastercon), in March 2008. He was the Author Guest of Honour at the Maryland Regional Science Fiction Convention (Balticon) in May 2009. He was Author Guest of Honour at Fantasticon (Denmark) in August 2009. He was the Guest of Honor at Boskone 48 in Feb 2011.

Cubicle 7 used their Basic Role-Playing license to create The Laundry (2010), based on Stross' writings, wherein agents must deal with the outer gods and British bureaucracy at the same time. [12] :432

In September 2012, Stross released The Rapture of the Nerds , a novel written in collaboration with Cory Doctorow. [15] The two have also together been involved in the Creative Commons licensing and copyright movement. [16] In December 2017 he gave a talk at 34C3. [17]

Awards

Accelerando won the 2006 Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. [18] "Missile Gap" won the 2007 Locus Award for best novella. [19] "The Concrete Jungle" (contained in The Atrocity Archives) won the Hugo Award for best novella in 2005; [8] "Palimpsest", included in Wireless, won the same award in 2010, [20] and "Equoid" in 2014. [21] Glasshouse won the 2009 Prometheus Award for Best Novel; Stross was a Best Novel finalist in 2009 for Saturn's Children and has been nominated four other times for Iron Sunrise (in 2005), Accelerando (2006), The Revolution Business (2010) and Annihilation Score (2016). [22] The Apocalypse Codex won the 2013 Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel. [23] Stross's work has also been nominated for a number of other awards, including the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, [9] Arthur C. Clarke Award, [24] and the Hugo Award for Best Novel, [8] [10] [25] [26] as well as the Japanese Seiun Award. [19]

Selected bibliography

Merchant Princes series

The Laundry Files

Halting State series

Standalone work

Related Research Articles

Dan Simmons is an American science fiction and horror writer. He is the author of the Hyperion Cantos and the Ilium/Olympos cycles, among other works which span the science fiction, horror, and fantasy genres, sometimes within a single novel. Simmons' genre-intermingling Song of Kali (1985) won the World Fantasy Award. He also writes mysteries and thrillers, some of which feature the continuing character Joe Kurtz.

Robert Charles Wilson American-Canadian science fiction author

Robert Charles Wilson is an American-Canadian science fiction author.

Ted Chiang American science-fiction writer

Ted Chiang is an American science fiction writer. His work has won four Nebula awards, four Hugo awards, the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and four Locus awards. His short story, "Story of Your Life", was the basis of the film Arrival (2016).

Connie Willis American science fiction writer

Constance Elaine Trimmer Willis, commonly known as Connie Willis, is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. She has won eleven Hugo Awards and seven Nebula Awards for particular works—more major SF awards than any other writer—most recently the "Best Novel" Hugo and Nebula Awards for Blackout/All Clear (2010). She was inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2009 and the Science Fiction Writers of America named her its 28th SFWA Grand Master in 2011.

The Hugo Award for Best Novella is one of the Hugo Awards given each year for science fiction or fantasy stories published or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The novella award is available for works of fiction of between 17,500 and 40,000 words; awards are also given out in the short story, novelette and novel categories. The Hugo Awards have been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".

Hugo Award for Best Novelette literary award for science fiction or fantasy stories in English

The Hugo Award for Best Novelette is one of the Hugo Awards given each year for science fiction or fantasy stories published or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The novelette award is available for works of fiction of between 7,500 and 17,500 words; awards are also given out in the short story, novella and novel categories. The Hugo Awards have been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".

Nancy Kress American science fiction writer

Nancy Anne Kress is an American science fiction writer. She began writing in 1976 but has achieved her greatest notice since the publication of her Hugo- and Nebula-winning 1991 novella Beggars in Spain, which became a novel in 1993. She also won the Nebula Award for Best Novella in 2013 for After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall, and in 2015 for Yesterday's Kin.

Ian McDonald (British author) British science fiction novelist

Ian McDonald is a British science fiction novelist, living in Belfast. His themes include nanotechnology, postcyberpunk settings, and the impact of rapid social and technological change on non-Western societies.

Peter Watts (author) Canadian biologist and writer

Peter Watts is a Canadian science fiction author. He specializes in hard science fiction. He earned a Ph.D from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1991, from the Department of Zoology and Resource Ecology. He went on to hold several academic research and teaching positions, and worked as a marine-mammal biologist. He began publishing fiction around the time he finished graduate school.

<i>Accelerando</i> science fiction novel by Charles Stross

Accelerando is a 2005 science fiction novel consisting of a series of interconnected short stories written by British author Charles Stross. As well as normal hardback and paperback editions, it was released as a free e-book under the CC BY-NC-ND license. Accelerando won the Locus Award in 2006, and was nominated for several other awards in 2005 and 2006, including the Hugo, Campbell, Clarke, and British Science Fiction Association Awards.

The Laundry Files is a series of novels by Charles Stross. They mix the genres of Lovecraftian horror, spy thriller, science fiction, and workplace humour. Their main character for the first five novels is "Bob Howard", a one-time I.T. consultant turned occult field agent. Howard is recruited to work for the Q-Division of SOE, otherwise known as "the Laundry", the British government agency which deals with occult threats. "Magic" is described as being a branch of applied computation (mathematics), therefore computers and equations are just as useful, and perhaps more potent, than classic spellbooks, pentagrams, and sigils for the purpose of influencing ancient powers and opening gates to other dimensions. These occult struggles happen largely out of view of the public, as the Laundry seeks to keep the methods for contacting such powers under wraps. There are also elements of dry humour and satirisation of bureaucracy.

Paolo Bacigalupi American science fiction and fantasy writer

Paolo Tadini Bacigalupi is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. He has won the Hugo, Nebula, John. W. Campbell, Compton Crook, Theodore Sturgeon, and Michael L. Printz awards, and has been nominated for the National Book Award. His fiction has appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Asimov's Science Fiction, and the environmental journal High Country News. Nonfiction essays of his have appeared in Salon.com and High Country News, and have been syndicated in newspapers, including the Idaho Statesman, the Albuquerque Journal, and the Salt Lake Tribune.

<i>Glasshouse</i> (novel) science fiction novel by charles Stross

Glasshouse is a science fiction novel by British author Charles Stross, first published in 2006. The novel is set in the twenty seventh century aboard a spacecraft adrift in interstellar space. Robin, the protagonist, has recently had his memory erased. He agrees to take part in an experiment, during which he is placed inside a model of a late twentieth/early twenty-first century Euroamerican society. Robin is given a new identity and body, specifically that of a woman named "Reeve". Major themes of this novel are identity, gender determinism, self-image and conformity. Contrary to popular belief, it is not a sequel to his 2005 novel Accelerando, although Stross has stated that the two novels are not obviously incompatible. Glasshouse won the Prometheus Award for 2007, and was nominated for the Hugo, Campbell, and Locus Awards in 2007.

The 47th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Noreascon 3, was held August 31–September 4, 1989, at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel, Hilton Hotel, Boston Park Plaza, and the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

Mary Robinette Kowal American writer and puppeteer

Mary Robinette Kowal is an American author and puppeteer.

<i>Saturns Children</i> (novel) book by Charles Stross

Saturn's Children is a 2008 science fiction novel by British author Charles Stross. Stross called it "a space opera and late-period [Robert A.] Heinlein tribute", specifically to Heinlein's 1982 novel Friday.

Aliette de Bodard French and American writer of speculative fiction

Aliette de Bodard is a French-American speculative fiction writer. She is of French/Vietnamese descent, born in the US, and grew up in Paris. French is her mother-tongue, but she writes in English. A graduate of École Polytechnique, she works as a software engineer specialising in image processing and is a member of the Written in Blood writers group.

<i>Terry Carrs Best Science Fiction of the Year</i> book by Terry Carr

Terry Carr's Best Science Fiction of the Year is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the fourteenth volume in a series of sixteen. It was first published in paperback by Tor Books in July 1985, and in hardcover and trade paperback by Gollancz in October of the same year, under the alternate title Best SF of the Year #14.

<i>The Best Science Fiction of the Year 10</i> book by Terry Carr

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #10 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the tenth volume in a series of sixteen. It was first published in paperback by Pocket Books in July 1981, and in trade paperback and hardcover and trade paperback by Gollancz in the same year.

This is a list of books by British hard science fiction, Lovecraftian horror, and space opera author Charles Stross.

References

  1. 1 2 "Summary Bibliography: Charles Stross". www.isfdb.org. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  2. "How I got here in the end – my non-writing careers". Antipope.org. Retrieved 31 January 2014.
  3. Stross, Charles. "Linux in Computer Shopper". antipope.org.
  4. "Charles Stross interviewed - infinity plus non-fiction".
  5. Charles Stross: Fast Forward, 2005, retrieved 14 October 2015
  6. Charles Stross Archived 9 October 2014 at the Wayback Machine , Tor.com (accessed 29 May 2013)
  7. "The Kyngdoms Interview". Kyngdoms. 26 May 2010. Retrieved 26 May 2010.
  8. 1 2 3 "2005 Hugo Awards: Best Novella: The Concrete Jungle; Best Novel Nominee: Iron Sunrise". Official Site of The Hugo Awards. Archived from the original on 7 May 2011.
  9. 1 2 "John W. Campbell Memorial Award Finalists". Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction, University of Kansas.
  10. 1 2 "2006 Hugo Awards: Accelerando (Nominee)". Official Site of The Hugo Awards. Archived from the original on 7 May 2011.
  11. "KLP 2009 Bestes ausländisches Werk". www.kurd-lasswitz-preis.de.
  12. 1 2 Shannon Appelcline (2011). Designers & Dragons. Mongoose Publishing. ISBN   978-1-907702-58-7.
  13. Evens, Arthur (2010). The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press. p. 728.
  14. "Conventions 2008". Locus Publications. 2008. Retrieved 15 February 2017.
  15. Upcoming4.me. "Cory Doctorow, Charles Stross' Rapture of The Nerds cover art and summary reveal". Upcoming4.me. Archived from the original on 18 July 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2012.
  16. Evens, Arthur (2010). The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. Wesleyan University Press. p. 727.
  17. Charles Stross (27 December 2017). "Dude, you broke the Future!". 34C3 (video). media.ccc.de. YouTube RmIgJ64z6Y4.
  18. "2006 Locus Awards". Archived from the original on 8 October 2010. Retrieved 27 May 2010.
  19. 1 2 "Stross, Charles". Index of Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Archived from the original on 12 November 2013.
  20. Locus Publications (5 September 2010). "Locus Online News " 2010 Hugo Awards Winners". Locusmag.com . Retrieved 5 February 2012.
  21. "2014 Hugo Award Winners". 17 August 2014. Archived from the original on 19 August 2014. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
  22. http://www.lfs.org/awards.shtml
  23. "Locus Award Winners". 30 June 2013. Retrieved 13 December 2014.
  24. "Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlists". Arthur C. Clarke Award. Archived from the original on 4 November 2018. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  25. "2008 Hugo Award Nominees". The Hugo Awards. 21 March 2008. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  26. "2009 Hugo Award Nominations: Saturn's Children". Official Site of The Hugo Awards. March 2003.
  27. "a book review by Annette Lapointe: The Labyrinth Index (Laundry Files)". www.nyjournalofbooks.com. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  28. "Introducing Dead Lies Dreaming - Charlie's Diary".
  29. 1 2 "Fiction by Charles Stross: FAQ (Feb 2020 version)". www.antipope.org. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  30. 1 2 "Waterstones entry for "The Lambda Functionary (Paperback)"". www.waterstones.com. Retrieved 12 April 2020.