Locus Award

Last updated
Locus Award
Locus award.png
Trophy used since 2018
Awarded forThe best science fiction, fantasy and horror of the previous year
Presented by Locus
First awarded1971
Website Locus Awards

The Locus Awards are an annual set of literary awards voted on by readers of the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus , a monthly based in Oakland, California. [1] The awards are presented at an annual banquet. In addition to the plaques awarded to the winners, publishers of winning works are honored with certificates, which is unique in the field. [2]

Contents

Originally a poll of Locus subscribers only, voting is now open to anyone, but the votes of subscribers count twice as much as the votes of non-subscribers. [3] The award was inaugurated in 1971, and was originally intended to provide suggestions and recommendations for the Hugo Awards. [2] They have come to share the stature of the Hugos and Nebulas, [1] and are considered a prestigious prize in science fiction, fantasy and horror literature. [4] [5]

Frequently nominated

As of the 2019 awards, the following have had the most nominations: [6]

PersonNominationsNominations (fiction)Wins
Robert Silverberg 158889
Gardner Dozois 1312143
Ellen Datlow 100014
Michael Swanwick 82733
Ursula K. Le Guin 805624
Martin H. Greenberg 8000
Gene Wolfe 73666
Stephen Baxter 73671
David G. Hartwell 7301
Robert Reed 71670
Lucius Shepard 70608
Gregory Benford 69540
Terri Windling 6610
Frederik Pohl 65463
Nancy Kress 64572
George R. R. Martin 624216

Categories

Inactive categories

There are several categories that no longer receive Locus Awards: [7]

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References

  1. 1 2 Langford, David. "Locus Award". In Clute, John; et al. (eds.). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (3rd ed.). Gollancz. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  2. 1 2 "Locus Awards". Science Fiction Awards Database. Retrieved 21 February 2021.
  3. "2020 Locus Poll and Survey". Locus. Archived from the original on Apr 13, 2020.
  4. Schaub, Michael (June 26, 2018). "Locus Award winners include N.K. Jemisin, Victor LaValle and John Scalzi". The Los Angeles Times .
  5. Flood, Allison (June 27, 2016). "Locus awards go to Ann Leckie, Naomi Novik and other stars". The Guardian .
  6. "Locus Awards Tallies". Science Fiction Awards Database. Retrieved 2019-10-27.
  7. Locus Award Winners by Category Archived 2013-10-02 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  8. Locus Awards for Best Original Anthology Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  9. Locus Award for Best Reprint Anthology/Collection Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  10. Locus Award for Best Fanzine Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  11. Locus Award for Best Single Fanzine Issue Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  12. Locus Award for Best Critic Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  13. Locus Award for Best Fan Writer Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  14. Locus Award for Best Fan Critic Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  15. Locus Award for Best Publisher - Hardcover Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  16. Locus Award for Best Publisher - Paperback Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  17. Locus Award for Best Paperback Cover Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  18. Locus Award for Best Magazine Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  19. Locus Award for Best Fan Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  20. Locus Award for Best Fan Cartoonist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013
  21. Locus Award for Best Convention Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine accessed 14 June 2013