Locus Award

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The Locus Awards are an annual set of literary awards by the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus , a monthly based in Oakland, California, United States. The award winners are selected by polling magazine readers.

Locus: The Magazine of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field, is an American magazine published monthly in Oakland, California. It is the news organ and trade journal for the English language science fiction and fantasy fields. It also publishes comprehensive listings of all new books published in the genres. The magazine also presents the annual Locus Awards. Locus Online was launched in April 1997, as a semi-autonomous web version of Locus Magazine.

Oakland, California City in California, United States

Oakland is the largest city and the county seat of Alameda County, California, United States. A major West Coast port city, Oakland is the largest city in the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area, the third largest city overall in the San Francisco Bay Area, the eighth most populated city in California, and the 45th largest city in the United States. With a population of 425,195 as of 2017, it serves as a trade center for the San Francisco Bay Area; its Port of Oakland is the busiest port in the San Francisco Bay, the entirety of Northern California, and the fifth busiest in the United States of America. An act to incorporate the city was passed on May 4, 1852, and incorporation was later approved on March 25, 1854, which officially made Oakland a city. Oakland is a charter city.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Contents

The awards are presented at an annual banquet. The publishers of winning works are honored with certificates, which is unique in the field. [1]

The Locus list was inaugurated in 1971 for publication year 1970 and was originally more of a list than an award, intended to predict the Hugo Awards, and then to provide suggestions and guidance for them. [1] [2]

Hugo Award Literary awards for science fiction or fantasy

The Hugo Awards are a set of literary awards given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and were officially named the Science Fiction Achievement Awards until 1992. Organized and overseen by the World Science Fiction Society, the awards are given each year at the annual World Science Fiction Convention as the central focus of the event. They were first given in 1953, at the 11th World Science Fiction Convention, and have been awarded every year since 1955. Over the years that the award has been given, the categories presented have changed; currently Hugo Awards are given in more than a dozen categories, and include both written and dramatic works of various types.

Winners

The following have won the most awards as of July 2011: [3]

Gardner Dozois American science fiction editor

Gardner Raymond Dozois was an American science fiction author and editor. He was the founding editor of The Year's Best Science Fiction anthologies (1984–present) and was editor of Asimov's Science Fiction magazine (1984–2004), garnering multiple Hugo and Locus Awards for those works almost every year. He also won the Nebula Award for Best Short Story twice. He was inducted to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame on June 25, 2011.

Michael Whelan American artist

Michael Whelan is an American artist of imaginative realism. For more than 30 years, he worked as an illustrator, specializing in science fiction and fantasy cover art. Since the mid-1990s, he has pursued a fine art career, selling non-commissioned paintings through galleries in the United States and through his website.

Ursula K. Le Guin American author

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin was an American author. She is best known for her works of speculative fiction, including science fiction works set in her Hainish Universe, and the Earthsea fantasy series. First published in 1959, she had a literary career spanning nearly sixty years, during which she released more than twenty novels and over a hundred short stories, in addition to many volumes of poetry, literary criticism, translations, and children's books. Frequently described as an "author of science fiction", Le Guin has said she would prefer to be known as an "American novelist", and has also been called a "major voice in American Letters".

China Miéville English writer

China Tom Miéville is a British urban fantasy fiction author, essayist, comic book writer, socialist political activist and literary critic. He often describes his work as weird fiction and allied to the loosely associated movement of writers sometimes called New Weird.

Kim Stanley Robinson American science fiction writer

Kim Stanley Robinson is an American writer of science fiction. He has published nineteen novels and numerous short stories but is best known for his Mars trilogy. His work has been translated into 24 languages. Many of his novels and stories have ecological, cultural, and political themes running through them and feature scientists as heroes. Robinson has won numerous awards, including the Hugo Award for Best Novel, the Nebula Award for Best Novel and the World Fantasy Award. Robinson's work has been labeled by The Atlantic as "the gold-standard of realistic, and highly literary, science-fiction writing." According to an article in The New Yorker, Robinson is "generally acknowledged as one of the greatest living science-fiction writers."

Gene Wolfe American science fiction and fantasy writer

Gene Rodman Wolfe was an American science fiction and fantasy writer. He was noted for his dense, allusive prose as well as the strong influence of his Catholic faith. He was a prolific short-story writer and novelist and won many science fiction and fantasy literary awards.

* indicates that all wins came in editing categories.
** indicates that all wins came in art-related categories.

Categories

Inactive categories

There are several categories that no longer receive Locus Awards: [4]

Related Research Articles

Terry Carr American writer

Terry Gene Carr was an American science fiction fan, author, editor, and writing instructor.

Wilson Tucker American science fiction writer

Arthur Wilson "Bob" Tucker was an American theater technician who became well known as a writer of mystery, action adventure, and science fiction under the name Wilson Tucker.

John Frederick Hertz is a California lawyer and long-time Los Angeles, California science fiction fan.

Steve Stiles American cartoonist

Steve Stiles is an American cartoonist and writer, coming out of the science fiction fanzine tradition. He won the 2016 Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist.

William Rotsler American writer

Charles William Rotsler was an artist, cartoonist, pornographer and science fiction author. Rotsler was a four-time Hugo Award winner and one-time Nebula Award nominee.

The 33rd World Science Fiction Convention, called Aussiecon, was held in Melbourne, Australia, August 14–17, 1975, at the Southern Cross Hotel.

The 17th World Science Fiction Convention, also known as Detention, was held September 4–7, 1959, at the Pick Fort Shelby Hotel in Detroit, Michigan, United States.

The 31st World Science Fiction Convention, also known as Torcon II, was held August 31 – September 3, 1973, at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

The 43rd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Aussiecon Two, was held 22–26 August 1985 at the Southern Cross, Victoria, and Sheraton Hotels in Melbourne, Australia. The convention was chaired by David Grigg. Total attendance was reported as 1,599 members.

The 44th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as ConFederation, was held August 28 through September 1, 1986, at the Marriott Marquis and Atlanta Hilton in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The convention was co-chaired by Penny Frierson and Ron Zukowski. Total attendance for the convention was reported as 5,811 members.

The 54th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as L.A.con III, was held August 29 through September 2, 1996, at the Hilton Anaheim, Anaheim Marriott, and the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, California, United States. The convention was chaired by Mike Glyer. Total attendance was reported as 6,703 members.

Trap Door is a science-fiction fanzine published by Robert Lichtman, with the first issue appearing in October 1983.

Bruce Gillespie Australian science fiction fan

Bruce Gillespie is a prominent Australian science fiction fan best known for his long-running sf fanzine SF Commentary. Along with Carey Handfield and Rob Gerrand, he was a founding editor of Norstrilia Press, which published Greg Egan's first novel.

Energumen was an influential science fiction fanzine edited by Mike Glicksohn and Susan Wood Glicksohn from 1970–1973, with a special final "11th Anniversary Issue!!" [sic] in 1981 after Susan's death. It won the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine in 1973, after having been a nominee for the Hugo Award for both the prior years.

BeABohema was a science fiction fanzine edited by Frank Lunney of Quakertown, Pennsylvania. It lasted for twenty issues from 1968 to December 1971, and was nominated for the 1970 Hugo Award for Best Fanzine, losing to Richard E. Geis' Science Fiction Review.

<i>The Best Science Fiction of the Year 2</i> book by Terry Carr

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #2 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by American writer Terry Carr, the second volume in a series of sixteen. It was first published in paperback by Ballantine Books in July 1973, and reissued in May 1976.

<i>Universe 1</i> book by Terry Carr

Universe 1 is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, and illustrated by Alicia Austin, the initial volume in a series of seventeen. It was first published in paperback by Ace Books in 1971, with a British hardcover facsimile edition following from Dennis Dobson in 1975.

<i>Universe 2</i> book by Terry Carr

Universe 2 is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr and illustrated by Alicia Austin, the second volume in the seventeen-volume Universe anthology series. It was first published in paperback by Ace Books in 1972, with a British hardcover facsimile edition following from Dennis Dobson in 1976.

Granfalloon was a science fiction fanzine published by Linda Bushyager. It was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine in 1972, losing to Locus; and 1973 . The first issue was published in 1966 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Suzanne Tompkins was co-editor for the first six issues. Twenty issues of Granfalloon were released, the last one in July 1976.

The Goethe Award, later known as the Comic Fan Art Award, was an American series of comic book fan awards, first presented in 1971 for comics published in 1970. The award originated with the fanzine Newfangles and then shared close ties with The Buyer's Guide to Comics Fandom.

References

  1. 1 2 "About the Locus Awards" Archived 2013-08-28 at the Wayback Machine .. The Locus Index to SF Awards. Locus. Retrieved 12 April 2012.
  2. Locus Science Fiction Award
    Locus nominations are presented annually to twenty publishers through a process of nomination by readers of Locus magazine. In 1971, when the first such list was compiled, it was not so much an award as an informal poll designed to predict the outcome of (and clarify the choices for) the Hugo awards.
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-12-01. Retrieved 2008-12-22.
  4. Locus Award Winners by Category Archived 2013-10-02 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  5. Locus Awards for Best Original Anthology Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  6. Locus Award for Best Reprint Anthology/Collection Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  7. Locus Award for Best Fanzine Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  8. Locus Award for Best Single Fanzine Issue Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  9. Locus Award for Best Critic Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  10. Locus Award for Best Fan Writer Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  11. Locus Award for Best Fan Critic Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  12. Locus Award for Best Publisher - Hardcover Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  13. Locus Award for Best Publisher - Paperback Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  14. Locus Award for Best Paperback Cover Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  15. Locus Award for Best Magazine Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  16. Locus Award for Best Fan Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  17. Locus Award for Best Fan Cartoonist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013
  18. Locus Award for Best Convention Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine . accessed 14 June 2013