Romantic fantasy

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Romantic fantasy is a subgenre of fantasy fiction, describing a fantasy story using many of the elements and conventions of the chivalric romance genre. [1]

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One of the key features of romantic fantasy involves the focus on relationships, social, political, and romantic. [2] Romantic fantasy has been published by both fantasy lines and romance lines.

Some publishers distinguish between "romantic fantasy" where the fantasy elements is most important and "fantasy romance" where the romance are most important. [1] Others say that "the borderline between fantasy romance and romantic fantasy has essentially ceased to exist, or if it's still there, it's moving back and forth constantly". [3]

Examples of romantic fantasy in literature

Abaelard und seine Schulerin Heloisa (English: Abaelard and His Student Heloisa
) Edmund Blair Leighton - Abaelard Und Seine Schulerin Heloisa.jpg
Abaelard und seine Schülerin Heloisa (English: Abaelard and His Student Heloisa)

See also

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The type of romance considered here is mainly the genre of novel defined by the novelist Walter Scott as "a fictitious narrative in prose or verse; the interest of which turns upon marvellous and uncommon incidents", in contrast to mainstream novels which realistically depict the state of a society. These works frequently, but not exclusively, take the form of the historical novel. Scott's novels are also frequently described as historical romances, and Northrop Frye suggested "the general principle that most 'historical novels' are romances". Scott describes romance as a "kindred term", and many European languages do not distinguish between romance and novel: "a novel is le roman, der Roman, il romanzo".

References

  1. 1 2 Robinson, William C. (October 2004). "A Few Thoughts on the Fantasy Genre". University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Archived from the original on 2 March 2009. Retrieved 22 December 2013.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  2. Snead, John. "What is Romantic Fantasy?". Green Ronin Publishing. Archived from the original on 8 May 2014. Retrieved 8 May 2014.
  3. Fantasy Reviews
  4. Reader's Advice
  5. "Auburn Hills Public Library - Booklist". Archived from the original on 23 February 2009. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  6. "Notes from RWA National Conference Panel - 16 July 2009". Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 19 December 2016.