Chandler Award

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The Chandler Award is presented by the Australian Science Fiction Foundation for "Outstanding Achievement in Australian Science Fiction".

It is named in recognition of the contribution that science fiction writer A. Bertram Chandler made to Australian science fiction, and because of his patronage of the Foundation.

Arthur Bertram Chandler was an Anglo-Australian mariner-turned-science fiction author.

Unlike the Ditmars, this award is decided upon by a jury and, although nominally an annual award presented in conjunction with the Australian National Science Fiction Convention, is not necessarily presented every year.

The Ditmar Award has been awarded annually since 1969 at the Australian National Science Fiction Convention to recognise achievement in Australian science fiction and science fiction fandom. The award is similar to the Hugo Award but on a national rather than international scale.

The Australian National Science Fiction Convention or Natcon is an annual science fiction convention. Each convention is run by a different committee unaffiliated with any national fannish body. Bids for running the Natcon are voted on by attendees at the Natcon two years in advance. These votes are held at a Business Meeting organised by the convention committee, and held at the convention, in practice much of the organisation of the meeting is done by a standing committee selected by the prior meeting.

The first Chandler Award was presented in 1992 to Van Ikin at the National Science Fiction Convention - SynCon '92. [1]

Van Ikin is an academic and science fiction writer and editor. A professor in English at the University of Western Australia, he retired from teaching in 2015 and is now a senior honorary research fellow. He has acted as supervisor for several Australian writers completing their post-graduate degrees and doctorates — including science fiction and fantasy writers Terry Dowling, Stephen Dedman, and Dave Luckett — and received the university's Excellence in Teaching Award for Postgraduate Research Supervision in 2000.

Winners

  *   Winners

YearWinnerRef.
1992 Van Ikin * [2]
1993Merv Binns* [2]
1994 George Turner * [2]
1995Wynne Whiteford* [2]
1996 Grant Stone * [2]
1997Susan Batho* [2]
1999Graham Stone* [2]
2001 John Bangsund * [2]
2002John Foyster* [2]
2003 Lucy Sussex * [2]
2006 Lee Harding * [2]
2007 Bruce Gillespie * [2]
2009 Rosaleen Love * [2]
2010 Damien Broderick * [2]
2011 Paul Collins * [2]
2012 Richard Harland * [2]
2013 Russell B. Farr * [2]
2014Danny Oz* [2]
2015Donna Maree Hanson* [2]
2016James Allen* [2]
2017Bill Wright* [2]
2018Edwina Harvey* [2]

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References

  1. "The Australian Science Fiction Foundation".
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 "Chandler Award". ASFF.
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