ARIA Hall of Fame

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ARIA Hall of Fame
The ARIA Hall of Fame.jpg
2008 ARIA Hall of Fame, 1 July, Melbourne Town Hall
Awarded forTo honour the growing number of legendary performers, producers, songwriters and others who have influenced music culture in Australia.
CountryAustralia
Presented by Australian Recording Industry Association
First awarded1988
Website aria.com.au/pages/hall-of-fame.htm
Television/radio coverage
Network Network Nine

Since 1988 the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) has inducted artists into its annual ARIA Hall of Fame. While most have been recognised at the annual ARIA Music Awards, in 2005 ARIA sought to create a separate standalone ceremony ARIA Icons: Hall of Fame event as only one or two acts could be inducted under the old format due to time restrictions. [1] Since 2005 VH1 obtained the rights to broadcast the show live on Foxtel, Austar and Optus networks; [2] and each year five or six acts were inducted into the Hall of Fame with an additional act inducted at the following ARIA Music Awards. [1]

Contents

At 1 July 2008 Hall of Fame ceremony, held at the Melbourne Town Hall, ARIA stated that the Hall of Fame ceremony would be completely separate from the ARIA Music Awards – there would be no additional inductees at the latter ceremony. [3] ARIA had opened the Hall of Fame ceremony to the general public for the first time, [3] and ARIA president Ed St John announced that a new annual exhibition, at the Melbourne Arts Centre from November, would showcase memorabilia honouring the Hall of Fame inductees. [4] In 2011, the ceremony returned to the general ARIA Music Awards with two new inductees. [5] In late 2017 ARIA established the Australian Music Vault at the Melbourne Arts Centre, which includes a section for all the inductees since 1988. [6]

List of inductees

YearInducteesRef.
1988 Joan Sutherland, Johnny O'Keefe, Slim Dusty, Col Joye, Vanda & Young, AC/DC [7] [8]
1989 Nellie Melba, Ross Wilson
1990 Percy Grainger, Sherbet
1991 Billy Thorpe, Glenn Shorrock, Don Burrows, Peter Dawson
1992 Skyhooks
1993 Cold Chisel, Peter Allen
1994 Men at Work
1995 The Seekers
1996 Australian Crawl, Horrie Dargie
1997 The Bee Gees, Paul Kelly, Graeme Bell
1998 The Masters Apprentices, The Angels
1999 Richard Clapton, Jimmy Little
2000 No inductees
2001 INXS, The Saints
2002 Olivia Newton-John
2003 John Farnham
2004 Little River Band
2005 Jimmy Barnes, Smoky Dawson, Renée Geyer, Normie Rowe, Split Enz, The Easybeats, Hunters & Collectors
2006 Daddy Cool, Divinyls, Icehouse, Helen Reddy, Rose Tattoo, Lobby Loyde, Midnight Oil
2007 Frank Ifield, Hoodoo Gurus, Marcia Hines, Jo Jo Zep & The Falcons, Brian Cadd, Radio Birdman, Nick Cave
2008 Dragon, Russell Morris, Max Merritt, The Triffids, Rolf Harris [nb 1]
2009 Kev Carmody, The Dingoes, Little Pattie, Mental As Anything, John Paul Young [10] [11]
2010 The Church, Models, Johnny Young, John Williamson, The Loved Ones [12]
2011 Kylie Minogue, The Wiggles [5]
2012 Yothu Yindi [13]
2013 Air Supply [14]
2014 Molly Meldrum, Countdown [15]
2015 Tina Arena [16]
2016 Crowded House [17]
2017 Daryl Braithwaite [18]
2018 Kasey Chambers [19]
2019 Human Nature [20]
2020 Archie Roach [21]
  1. In July 2014 ARIA announced that Rolf Harris' Hall of Fame award was withdrawn after he was convicted on 12 counts of indecent assault. [9]

Repeat inductees

Eleven artists have been inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame under more than one role:

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "ARIA Icons: Hall of Fame". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 18 July 2008. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  2. "ARIAs Hall of Fame". The Age . 30 May 2005.
  3. 1 2 Pope, Mark (1 May 2008). "ARIA Presents the 2008 ARIA Hall of Fame" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 July 2008. Retrieved 1 June 2008.
  4. "Aussie Music Legends' Gear to Go on Show" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Arts Centre. 2 July 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 July 2008. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  5. 1 2 Quinn, Karl (31 October 2011). "Wiggles, Kylie to Be Inducted into ARIA's Hall of Fame". The Sydney Morning Herald . Retrieved 3 November 2011.
  6. Eliezer, Christie (11 August 2017). "Australian Music Vault to include ARIA Hall of Fame section". The Music Network. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  7. "ARIA Hall of Fame". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 15 June 2008. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  8. "Winners by Award: Hall of Fame". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 2 February 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2020. Note: shows inductees from 1999 to 2008, inclusive.
  9. Cooper, Mex (1 July 2014). "Rolf Harris's ARIA Hall of Fame induction rescinded". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 1 July 2014.
  10. Collins, Simon (19 July 2009). "Love is in the Air at the ARIA Hall of Fame". The West Australian. Archived from the original on 21 April 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2009.
  11. "ARIA 2009 Hall of Fame announcement of inductees" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 17 July 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 September 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  12. "ARIA Hall Of Fame". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Archived from the original on 2 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  13. "Yothu Yindi Announced as 2012 Hall of Fame Inductee – 26th ARIA Awards". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 26 October 2012. Archived from the original on 30 December 2012. Retrieved 7 November 2012.
  14. "Air Supply to Be Inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame". ARIA Music News. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 24 October 2013. Archived from the original on 29 October 2013. Retrieved 28 October 2013.
  15. "Ian 'Molly' Meldrum and Countdown to be inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame". ARIA Music News. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 28 October 2014. Archived from the original on 21 February 2015. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  16. "One of the Greatest Australian Voices of all Time, Tina Arena to Be Inducted in the ARIA Hall of Fame". Australian Recording Industry Association. 25 October 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2015.
  17. "Crowded House to enter ARIA Hall of Fame". The Sydney Morning Herald. Australian Associated Press (AAP). 5 September 2016. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  18. "Daryl Braithwaite inducted into ARIA Hall of Fame". The Sydney Morning Herald. Australian Associated Press (AAP). 18 October 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  19. "Kasey Chambers to make history as ARIA Hall Of Fame inductee | TIO". www.theindustryobserver.com.au. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  20. Brandle, Lars (1 November 2019). "Human Nature to Be Inducted Into ARIA Hall of Fame". Billboard . Retrieved 2 November 2019.
  21. Cooper, Nathanael (10 November 2020). "'It is a great honour': Archie Roach to be inducted into ARIA hall of fame" . The Sydney Morning Herald . Retrieved 10 November 2020.