Alpine skiing at the 1988 Winter Olympics

Last updated
Alpine skiing
at the XV Olympic Winter Games
Kananaskis-Nakiska Ski.JPG
Nakiska on Mount Allan
Venue Nakiska
Kananaskis Country,
Alberta, Canada
DatesFebruary 15–27, 1988
No. of events10
Competitors271 from 43 nations
  1984
1992  
Canada relief map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Calgary 
Location in Canada
Canada Alberta relief location map - transverse mercator proj.svg
Blue pog.svg
Nakiska  
Red pog.svg
Calgary
Locations in Alberta

Alpine Skiing at the 1988 Winter Olympics consisted of ten alpine skiing events, held February 15–27 at Nakiska on Mount Allan, [1] a new ski area west of Calgary.

Contents

These Olympics featured the first change in the alpine skiing program in more than 30 years. The Super-G was added and the combined event returned; it was last contested at the Winter Olympics in 1948, prior to the addition of the giant slalom. [2]

Medal summary

Nine nations won medals in alpine skiing, as Switzerland led the medal table with eleven (three gold, four silver, and four bronze), followed by Austria with six. Vreni Schneider of Switzerland and Alberto Tomba of Italy shared the lead in the individual medal table with two gold medals each.

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)34411
2Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)3306
3Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)2002
4Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany  (FRG)1214
5Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)1012
6Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia  (YUG)0101
7Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)0022
8Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein  (LIE)0011
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0011
Totals (9 nations)10101030

Source: [1]

Men's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Pirmin Zurbriggen
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
1:59.63 Peter Müller
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
2:00.14 Franck Piccard
Flag of France.svg  France
2:01.24
Super-G
details
Franck Piccard
Flag of France.svg  France
1:39.66 Helmut Mayer
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:40.96 Lars-Börje Eriksson
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
1:41.08
Giant slalom
details
Alberto Tomba
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
2:06.37 Hubert Strolz
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2:07.41 Pirmin Zurbriggen
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
2:08.39
Slalom
details
Alberto Tomba
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:39.47 Frank Wörndl
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
1:39.53 Paul Frommelt
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
1:39.84
Combined
details
Hubert Strolz
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
36.55 Bernhard Gstrein
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
43.45 Paul Accola
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
48.24

Source: [1]

Women's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Marina Kiehl
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
1:25.86 Brigitte Oertli
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
1:26.61 Karen Percy
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
1:26.62
Super-G
details
Sigrid Wolf
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:19.03 Michela Figini
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
1:20.03 Karen Percy
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
1:20.29
Giant slalom
details
Vreni Schneider
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
2:06.49 Christa Kinshofer
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
2:07.42 Maria Walliser
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
2:07.72
Slalom
details
Vreni Schneider
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
1:36.69 Mateja Svet
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia
1:38.37 Christa Kinshofer
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
1:38.40
Combined
details
Anita Wachter
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
29.25 Brigitte Oertli
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
29.48 Maria Walliser
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
51.28

Source: [1]

Course information

DateRaceStart
Elevation
Finish
Elevation
Vertical
Drop
Course
Length
Average
Gradient
Mon 15-FebDownhill - men 2,412 m (7,913 ft) 1,538 m (5,046 ft) 874 m (2,867 ft) 3.147 km (1.955 mi)
Fri 19-FebDownhill - women2,179 m (7,149 ft)1,532 m (5,026 ft)647 m (2,123 ft)2.238 km (1.391 mi)
Tue 16-FebDownhill - (K) - men2,342 m (7,684 ft)1,538 m (5,046 ft)804 m (2,638 ft)2.967 km (1.844 mi)
Sat 20-FebDownhill - (K) - women2,108 m (6,916 ft)1,532 m (5,026 ft)576 m (1,890 ft)2.054 km (1.276 mi)
Sun 21-FebSuper-G - men2,179 m (7,149 ft)1,532 m (5,026 ft)647 m (2,123 ft)2.327 km (1.446 mi)
Mon 22-FebSuper-G - women2,039 m (6,690 ft)1,532 m (5,026 ft)507 m (1,663 ft)1.943 km (1.207 mi)
Thu 25-FebGiant Slalom - men2,243 m (7,359 ft)1,874 m (6,148 ft)369 m (1,211 ft)1.175 km (0.730 mi)
Wed 24-FebGiant Slalom - women2,205 m (7,234 ft)1,880 m (6,168 ft)325 m (1,066 ft)0.839 km (0.521 mi)
Sat 27-FebSlalom - men2,074 m (6,804 ft)1,875 m (6,152 ft)198 m (650 ft)  0.530 km (0.329 mi)
Fri 26-FebSlalom - women2,060 m (6,759 ft)1,880 m (6,168 ft)180 m (591 ft)  0.550 km (0.342 mi)
Wed 17-FebSlalom - (K) - men2,051 m (6,729 ft)1,875 m (6,152 ft)176 m (577 ft)  
Sun 21-FebSlalom - (K) - women2,024 m (6,640 ft)1,880 m (6,168 ft)144 m (472 ft)  

Source: [1]

Participating nations

Forty-three nations sent alpine skiers to compete in the events in Calgary. Guatemala, the US Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico made their Olympic alpine skiing debuts. Below is a list of the competing nations; in parentheses are the number of national competitors. [1]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Nakiska

Nakiska is a ski resort in western Canada, in the Kananaskis Country region of the province of Alberta. It is located 83 km (52 mi) from Calgary, west on Highway 1 and south on Highway 40. "Nakiska" is a Cree word meaning "to meet" or "meeting place."

Alpine skiing at the 1988 Winter Olympics – Mens downhill

The Men's downhill competition of the Calgary 1988 Olympics was held at the newly-developed Nakiska on Mount Allan on Monday, February 15.

Alpine skiing at the 1988 Winter Olympics – Mens super-G

The Men's Super G competition of the Calgary 1988 Olympics was held at Nakiska on Sunday, February 21. This was the Olympic debut of the event.

The Women's Super G competition of the Calgary 1988 Olympics was held at Nakiska on Monday, February 22. This was the Olympic debut of the event.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Calgary 1988 Official Report" (PDF). XV Olympic Winter Games Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. 1988. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  2. "Alpine Skiing at the 1988 Calgary Winter Games". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2018.