Alpine skiing at the 1992 Winter Olympics

Last updated
Alpine skiing
at the XVI Olympic Winter Games
Alpine skiing pictogram.svg
Venue Val d’Isère,
Les Menuires (men's slalom),
Méribel (women's races),
Savoie, France
Dates9–22 February 1992
No. of events10
Competitors321 from 50 nations
  1988
1994  

Alpine Skiing at the 1992 Winter Olympics at Albertville, France, consisted of ten alpine skiing events, held 9–22 February. The men's races were held at Val d’Isère, except for the slalom, which was at Les Menuires. All five women's events were conducted at Méribel. [1] [2]

Contents

Medal summary

Twelve nations won medals in Alpine skiing, with Austria leading the medal table with eight (3 gold, 2 silver, and 3 bronze). Petra Kronberger of Austria led the individual medal table with two gold medals, while Alberto Tomba of Italy was the most successful male skier with two medals, one gold and one silver.

Marc Girardelli's two silver medals were the first won for Luxembourg in the Winter Olympics, and made him its most successful Olympic athlete to date. Annelise Coberger's silver medal in the women's slalom was New Zealand's first, and through 2014, only Winter Olympic medal. Norway's four medals were its first in alpine skiing in 40 years, since 1952 in Oslo.

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)3238
2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)3205
3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)2024
4Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)1001
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)1001
6Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)0213
7Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg  (LUX)0202
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)0202
9Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand  (NZL)0101
10Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)0011
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)0011
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)0011
Totals (12 nations)1011930

Source: [1]

Men's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Patrick Ortlieb
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:50.37 Franck Piccard
Flag of France.svg  France
1:50.42 Günther Mader
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:50.47
Super-G
details
Kjetil André Aamodt
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1:13.04 Marc Girardelli
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg
1:13.77 Jan Einar Thorsen
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1:13.83
Giant slalom
details
Alberto Tomba
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
2:06.98 Marc Girardelli
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg
2:07.30 Kjetil André Aamodt
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
2:07.82
Slalom
details
Finn Christian Jagge
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1:44.39 Alberto Tomba
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:44.67 Michael Tritscher
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:44.85
Combined
details
Josef Polig
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
14.58 Gianfranco Martin
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
14.90 Steve Locher
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
18.16

Source: [1]

Women's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Kerrin Lee-Gartner
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
1:52.55 Hilary Lindh
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
1:52.61 Veronika Wallinger
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:52.64
Super-G
details
Deborah Compagnoni
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:21.22 Carole Merle
Flag of France.svg  France
1:22.63 Katja Seizinger
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
1:23.19
Giant slalom
details
Pernilla Wiberg
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2:12.74 Anita Wachter
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
Diann Roffe
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
2:13.71Not awarded
Slalom
details
Petra Kronberger
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:32.68 Annelise Coberger
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
1:33.10 Blanca Fernández Ochoa
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
1:33.35
Combined
details
Petra Kronberger
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2.55 Anita Wachter
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
19.39 Florence Masnada
Flag of France.svg  France
21.38

Source: [1]

Course information

DateRaceStart
Elevation
Finish
Elevation
Vertical
Drop
Course
Length
Average
Gradient
Sun   9-FebDownhill - men 2,809 m (9,216 ft) 1,836 m (6,024 ft) 973 m (3,192 ft) 3.048 km (1.894 mi)
Sat 15-FebDownhill - women2,260 m (7,415 ft)1,432 m (4,698 ft)828 m (2,717 ft)2.770 km (1.721 mi)
Mon 10-FebDownhill - (K) - men2,680 m (8,793 ft)1,836 m (6,024 ft)844 m (2,769 ft)2.638 km (1.639 mi)
Wed 12-FebDownhill - (K) - women2,080 m (6,824 ft)1,432 m (4,698 ft)648 m (2,126 ft)2.200 km (1.367 mi)
Sun 16-FebSuper-G - men2,371 m (7,779 ft)1,836 m (6,024 ft)535 m (1,755 ft)1.650 km (1.025 mi)
Tue 18-FebSuper-G - women1,930 m (6,332 ft)1,432 m (4,698 ft)498 m (1,634 ft)1.510 km (0.938 mi)
Tue 18-FebGiant Slalom - men2,220 m (7,283 ft)1,836 m (6,024 ft)384 m (1,260 ft)1.135 km (0.705 mi)
Wed 19-FebGiant Slalom - women1,830 m (6,004 ft)1,432 m (4,698 ft)398 m (1,306 ft)1.320 km (0.820 mi)
Sat 22-FebSlalom - men2,070 m (6,791 ft)1,850 m (6,070 ft)220 m (722 ft)  0.626 km (0.389 mi)
Thu 20-FebSlalom - women1,622 m (5,322 ft)1,432 m (4,698 ft)190 m (623 ft)  0.480 km (0.298 mi)
Tue 11-FebSlalom - (K) - men2,040 m (6,693 ft)1,836 m (6,024 ft)204 m (669 ft)  
Thu 13-FebSlalom - (K) - women1,572 m (5,157 ft)1,432 m (4,698 ft)140 m (459 ft)  0.350 km (0.217 mi)

Source: [1]

Participating nations

Fifty nations sent alpine skiers to compete in the events in Albertville. Algeria, Brazil, Croatia, Denmark, North Korea, Slovenia, Swaziland and the Unified Team (athletes from the former Soviet Union) made their Olympic alpine skiing debuts. Germany competed as one team for the first time since 1964. Below is a list of the competing nations; in parentheses are the number of national competitors. [1]

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Swaziland at the 1992 Winter Olympics Sporting event delegation

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Australia at the 1994 Winter Paralympics Sporting event delegation

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Albertville 1992 Official Report" (PDF). Le Comité d'Organisation des Jeux Olympiques Albertville. LA84 Foundation. 1992. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2008. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  2. "Alpine Skiing at the 1992 Albertville Winter Games". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 25 March 2018.