Alpine skiing at the 2002 Winter Olympics

Last updated

Alpine skiing
at the XIX Olympic Winter Games
Alpine skiing pictogram.svg
Venue Snowbasin
(downhill, super-G, combined),
Park City (giant slalom),
Deer Valley (slalom),
Utah, United States
DatesFebruary 10–23, 2002
No. of events10
Competitors278 (157 men, 121 women) from 57 nations
  1998
2006  
USA Region West relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Salt Lake City 
Location in the western United States
USA Utah location map.svg
Blue pog.svg
Snowbasin
Green pog.svg
Park City /
Deer Valley
Red pog.svg
Salt Lake City
Locations in Utah
Men's Super G;
Snowbasin, February 16 Super G at 2002 Winter Olympics.jpg
Men's Super G;
Snowbasin, February 16
Belarusian postage stamp Belarus stamp no. 448 - 2002 Winter Olympics slalom.jpg
Belarusian postage stamp

Alpine skiing at the 2002 Winter Olympics consisted of ten events held February 10–23 in the United States near Salt Lake City, Utah. The downhill, super-G, and combined events were held at Snowbasin, the giant slaloms at Park City, and the slaloms at adjacent Deer Valley. [1] [2]

Contents

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia  (CRO)3104
2Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)2259
3Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)2204
4Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)2114
5Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)1113
6Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)0202
7Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0112
8Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)0011
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)0011
Totals (9 nations)10101030

Source: [1]

Men's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Fritz Strobl
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:39.13 Lasse Kjus
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1:39.35 Stephan Eberharter
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:39.41
Combined
details
Kjetil André Aamodt
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
3:17.56 Bode Miller
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
3:17.84 Benjamin Raich
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
3:18.26
Super-G
details
Kjetil André Aamodt
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1:21.58 Stephan Eberharter
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:21.68 Andreas Schifferer
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:21.83
Giant slalom
details
Stephan Eberharter
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2:23.28 Bode Miller
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
2:24.16 Lasse Kjus
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
2:24.32
Slalom
details
Jean-Pierre Vidal
Flag of France.svg  France
1:41.06 Sébastien Amiez
Flag of France.svg  France
1:41.82 Benjamin Raich
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:42.41

Source: [1]

Women's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Carole Montillet
Flag of France.svg  France
1:39.56 Isolde Kostner
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:40.01 Renate Götschl
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:40.39
Combined
details
Janica Kostelić
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia
2:43.28 Renate Götschl
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2:44.77 Martina Ertl
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2:45.16
Super-G
details
Daniela Ceccarelli
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:13.59 Janica Kostelić
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia
1:13.64 Karen Putzer
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:13.86
Giant slalom
details
Janica Kostelić
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia
2:30.01 Anja Pärson
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2:31.33 Sonja Nef
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
2:31.67
Slalom
details
Janica Kostelić
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia
1:46.10 Laure Pequegnot
Flag of France.svg  France
1:46.17 Anja Pärson
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
1:47.09

Source: [1]

Participating NOCs

Forty-nine nations competed in the alpine skiing events at Salt Lake City.

Course information

DateRaceStart
elevation
Finish
elevation
Vertical
drop
Course
length
Average
gradient
Sun 10 FebDownhill – men 2,831 m (9,288 ft) 1,948 m (6,391 ft) 883 m (2,897 ft) 2.860 km (1.777 mi)30.9%
Tue 12 FebDownhill – women2,748 m (9,016 ft)1,948 m (6,391 ft)800 m (2,625 ft)2.694 km (1.674 mi)29.7%
Wed 13 FebDownhill (K) – men2,787 m (9,144 ft)1,948 m (6,391 ft)839 m (2,753 ft)2.679 km (1.665 mi)31.3%
Thu 14 FebDownhill (K) – women2,655 m (8,711 ft)1,948 m (6,391 ft)707 m (2,320 ft)2.237 km (1.390 mi)31.6%
Sat 16 FebSuper-G – men2,596 m (8,517 ft)1,948 m (6,391 ft)648 m (2,126 ft)2.068 km (1.285 mi)31.3%
Sun 17 FebSuper-G – women2,548 m (8,360 ft)1,948 m (6,391 ft)600 m (1,969 ft)1.944 km (1.208 mi)30.9%
Thu 21 FebGiant slalom – men2,510 m (8,235 ft)2,120 m (6,955 ft)390 m (1,280 ft)
Fri 22 FebGiant slalom – women2,510 m (8,235 ft)2,120 m (6,955 ft)390 m (1,280 ft)
Sat 23 FebSlalom – men2,488 m (8,163 ft)2,274 m (7,461 ft)214 m (702 ft)  
Wed 20 FebSlalom – women2,488 m (8,163 ft)2,274 m (7,461 ft)214 m (702 ft)  
Wed 13 FebSlalom (K) – men2,113 m (6,932 ft)1,948 m (6,391 ft)165 m (541 ft)  
Thu 14 FebSlalom (K) – women2,100 m (6,890 ft)1,948 m (6,391 ft)152 m (499 ft)  

Snowbasin hosted the downhill, super-G, and combined events; the giant slaloms were at Park City and the slaloms at adjacent Deer Valley
Source: [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "The Official Report of the XIX Olympic Winter Games - Salt Lake 2002" (PDF). Salt Lake Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 January 2014. Retrieved 25 February 2014.
  2. "Alpine Skiing at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Games". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2018.