Alpine skiing at the 1984 Winter Olympics

Last updated
Alpine skiing
at the XIV Olympic Winter Games
Bijelasnica2.jpg
Bjelašnica
Venue Bjelašnica (men),
Jahorina (women),
SR of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia
Dates13–19 February 1984
No. of events6
Competitors225 from 42 nations
  1980
1988  

Alpine Skiing at the 1984 Winter Olympics consisted of six alpine skiing events, held 13–19 February in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. The men's races were at Bjelašnica and the women's at Jahorina. [1] Due to weather delays (a blizzard), both downhill races were postponed several days and run after the giant slalom races. [2]

Contents

This was the first Winter Olympics since 1936 which did not also serve as the world championships for alpine skiing. It was the last Olympic program with just six events for alpine skiing; ten events were held in 1988 with the return of the combined event and the addition of Super G.

Banned from competition at these Olympics by the International Ski Federation (FIS) were top World Cup racers Ingemar Stenmark of Sweden and Hanni Wenzel of Liechtenstein, both double gold medalists at the 1980 Winter Olympics and leading the World Cup in 1984. They had accepted promotional payments directly, rather than through their national ski federations. [3] [4] [5] Also absent was Marc Girardelli, who had not yet gained his citizenship from Luxembourg and was not allowed to compete for his native Austria. [5] [6]

Medal summary

Eight nations won medals in alpine skiing, and the United States led the medal table with three gold and two silver. Perrine Pelen was the only racer to win multiple medals, taking a silver and a bronze.

Host nation Yugoslavia won its first alpine medal in the Winter Olympics with Jure Franko's silver in the men's giant slalom. Czechoslovakia's medal, won by Olga Charvátová in the women's downhill, was its only Olympic medal ever won in alpine skiing.

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)3205
2Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)2204
3Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)1001
4Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)0123
5Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia  (YUG)0101
6Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein  (LIE)0022
7Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)0011
Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia  (TCH)0011
Totals (8 nations)66618

Source: [1]

Men's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Bill Johnson
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
1:45.59 Peter Müller
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
1:45.86 Anton Steiner
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:45.95
Giant slalom
details
Max Julen
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
2:41.18 Jure Franko
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia
2:41.41 Andreas Wenzel
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
2:41.75
Slalom
details
Phil Mahre
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
1:39.41 <3 Steve Mahre
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
1:39.62 <3 Didier Bouvet
Flag of France.svg  France
1:40.20

Source: [1]

Women's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill
details
Michela Figini
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
1:13.36 Maria Walliser
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
1:13.41 Olga Charvátová
Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia
1:13.53
Giant slalom
details
Debbie Armstrong
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
2:20.98 Christin Cooper
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
2:21.38 Perrine Pelen
Flag of France.svg  France
2:21.40
Slalom
details
Paola Magoni
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:36.47 Perrine Pelen
Flag of France.svg  France
1:37.38 Ursula Konzett
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
1:37.50

Source: [1]

Course information

DateRaceStart
Elevation
Finish
Elevation
Vertical
Drop
Course
Length
Average
Gradient
Thu 16-FebDownhill – men2,076 m (6,811 ft)1,273 m (4,177 ft)803 m (2,635 ft)3.066 km (1.905 mi)
Thu 16-FebDownhill – women1,872 m (6,142 ft)1,325 m (4,347 ft)547 m (1,795 ft)1.965 km (1.221 mi)
Tue 14-FebGiant Slalom – men1,745 m (5,725 ft)1,363 m (4,472 ft)382 m (1,253 ft)
Mon 13-FebGiant Slalom – women1,665 m (5,463 ft)1,328 m (4,357 ft)337 m (1,106 ft)
Sun 19-FebSlalom – men1,563 m (5,128 ft)1,363 m (4,472 ft)200 m (656 ft)
Fri 17-FebSlalom – women1,840 m (6,037 ft)1,670 m (5,479 ft)170 m (558 ft)

Source: [1]

Participating nations

Forty-two nations sent alpine skiers to compete in the events in Sarajevo. Egypt, Mexico, Monaco and Senegal made their Olympic alpine skiing debuts. Below is a list of the competing nations; in parentheses are the number of national competitors. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Sarajevo 1984 Official Report" (PDF). Organising Committee of the XlVth Winter Olympic Games 1984 at Sarajevo. LA84 Foundation. 1984. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  2. "Alpine Skiing at the 1984 Sarajevo Winter Games". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2018.
  3. "Ski stars banned from Olympics". Ottawa Citizen. Reuters. November 26, 1983. p. 71.
  4. "Ruling slaps Stenmark". Bend (OR) Bulletin. UPI. November 7, 1983. p. D-4.
  5. 1 2 "Winter Olympics will take place without three alpine skiers". Palm Beach Post. wire services. January 25, 1984. p. D4.
  6. "Mahre skis for gold". Observer Reporter. Washington, PA. Associated Press. February 11, 1984. p. B-8.