Athletics at the 1952 Summer Olympics – Men's triple jump

Last updated
Men's triple jump
at the Games of the XV Olympiad
Adhemar da Silva 1956b.jpg
Adhemar da Silva (1956)
Venue Helsinki Olympic Stadium
DateJuly 23
Competitors35 from 23 nations
Winning distance16.22 WR
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Adhemar da Silva
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil
Silver medal icon.svg Leonid Shcherbakov
Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union
Bronze medal icon.svg Asnoldo Devonish
Flag of Venezuela (1930-1954).svg  Venezuela
  1948
1956  

The men's triple jump at the 1952 Olympic Games took place on 23 July at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium. Thirty-five athletes from 23 nations competed. [1] The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. Brazilian athlete Adhemar da Silva won the gold medal, breaking the world record twice. [2] It was Brazil's first medal and first victory in the men's long jump. All three of the nations represented on the podium were relatively new to the event in the Olympics; Brazil had sent triple jumpers in 1948 (including da Silva), but the Soviet Union (Leonid Shcherbakov's silver) and Venezuela (Asnoldo Devonish's bronze) each won medals in their first appearance.

Contents

Background

This was the 12th appearance of the event, which is one of 12 athletics events to have been held at every Summer Olympics. Returning finalists from the 1948 Games were gold medalist Arne Åhman of Sweden, fourth-place finisher Preben Larsen of Denmark, fifth-place finisher Geraldo de Oliveira of Brazil, sixth-place finisher Valle Rautio of Finland, and eighth-place finisher Adhemar da Silva of Brazil. The last of these, da Silva, had been very successful in the intervening four years; he tied the world record in 1950 and broke it in 1951, as well as winning the Pan American championship. He was "co-favorite" with European champion Leonid Shcherbakov of the Soviet Union. [1]

Belgium, Egypt, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Saar, the Soviet Union, and Venezuela each made their first appearance in the event. The United States competed for the 12th time, having competed at each of the Games so far.

Competition format

The competition used the two-round format introduced in 1936. In the qualifying round, each jumper received three attempts to reach the qualifying distance of 14.55 metres; if fewer than 12 men did so, the top 12 (including all those tied) would advance. In the final round, each athlete had three jumps; the top six received an additional three jumps, with the best of the six to count. [1] [3]

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World recordFlag of Brazil.svg  Adhemar da Silva  (BRA)16.01 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 30 September 1951
Olympic recordFlag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Naoto Tajima  (JPN)16.00 Berlin, Germany 6 August 1936

Adhemar da Silva jumped further than his own world record four times: 16.12 in the second jump in the final round, 16.09 in the fourth, 16.22 in the fifth, and 16.05 in the sixth.

Schedule

All times are Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)

DateTimeRound
Wednesday, 23 July 195210:00
15:00
Qualifying
Final

Results

Qualifying

Those achieving the qualifying performance of 14.55 metres advanced to the final.

RankGroupAthleteNation123DistanceNotes
1A Adhemar da Silva Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 15.3215.32Q
2A Asnoldo Devonish Flag of Venezuela (1930-1954).svg  Venezuela 14.2215.2415.24Q
3B Leonid Shcherbakov Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 15.0515.05Q
4A Jim Gerhardt US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 14.9814.98Q
5A Reino Hiltunen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland X14.8214.82Q
6A Yoshio Iimuro Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 14.8114.81Q
7B Arne Åhman Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 13.2314.7214.72Q
8B Rune Nilsen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 14.6514.65Q
9B Zygfryd Weinberg Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 14.4614.6514.65Q
10B Geraldo de Oliveira Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 14.6414.64Q
11A Preben Larsen Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 14.6214.62Q
12B Tadashi Yamamoto Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 13.9014.3014.6014.60Q
13B Rui Ramos Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 13.91X14.5914.59Q
14A Walter Ashbaugh US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 14.5914.59Q
B Roger Norman Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 14.5914.59Q
16A Jacques Boulanger Flag of France.svg  France X14.3714.4914.49
17B José da Conceição Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 14.25X14.4614.46
18A Choi Yeong-gi Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).png  South Korea 12.1114.3814.4414.44
19A Malik M'Baye Flag of France.svg  France 14.3413.8614.3914.39
20A Keizo Hasegawa Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan X14.3914.1814.39
21B George Shaw US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 13.6414.39X14.39
22B Pentti Uusihauta Flag of Finland.svg  Finland XX14.3814.38
23B Valle Rautio Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 14.14XX14.14
24B Rade Radovanović Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 13.42X14.1314.13
25A William Laing Flag of the Gold Coast.svg  Ghana 13.8914.0913.9514.09
26B Vasilios Sakellarakis Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece 14.0513.7313.6814.05
27A Eugénio Lopes Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 13.6714.0513.5514.05
28A Stanisław Kowal Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 14.03XX14.03
29A Willi Burgard Flag of Saar (1947-1956).svg  Saar 13.47X13.8613.86
30A Nikola Dagorov Flag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg  Bulgaria 13.3912.1613.8213.82
31B Felix Würth Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 13.65X13.5313.65
32A Akin Altiok Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 13.1412.9813.6213.62
33A Walter Herssens Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 13.5213.0313.1113.52
34A Fawzi Chaaban Flag of Egypt (1922-1958).svg  Egypt 12.85X13.4513.45
35A Francisco Castro Puerto rico national sport flag.svg  Puerto Rico 13.3513.2713.3713.37
AVladimir FilippovFlag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union DNS
BMikhail MikhailFlag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece DNS
B Neville Price Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa DNS
B Héctor Román Puerto rico national sport flag.svg  Puerto Rico DNS
B Kamtorn Sanidwong Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand DNS
BOscar SimónFlag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain DNS

Final

Devonish was injured and did not jump after the second round.

RankAthleteNation123456DistanceNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Adhemar da Silva Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 15.9516.12 WR 15.5416.0916.22 WR 16.0516.22 WR
Silver medal icon.svg Leonid Shcherbakov Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 15.0715.2615.1815.9815.84X15.98
Bronze medal icon.svg Asnoldo Devonish Flag of Venezuela (1930-1954).svg  Venezuela 15.0415.5215.52
4 Walter Ashbaugh US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 15.0515.3914.5614.5015.38X15.39
5 Rune Nilsen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 15.1314.21X14.70XX15.13
6 Yoshio Iimuro Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 14.99XXX14.6613.7014.99
7 Geraldo de Oliveira Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil X14.9512.66Did not advance14.95
8 Roger Norman Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 14.89X12.66Did not advance14.89
9 Reino Hiltunen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 14.85X14.40Did not advance14.85
10 Zygfryd Weinberg Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 14.76XXDid not advance14.76
11 Jim Gerhardt US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 14.6914.2814.06Did not advance14.69
12 Rui Ramos Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 14.6913.8212.15Did not advance14.69
13 Preben Larsen Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 14.62X14.19Did not advance14.62
14 Tadashi Yamamoto Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan XX14.57Did not advance14.57
15 Arne Åhman Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden XX14.05Did not advance14.05

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Triple Jump, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  2. "Athletics at the 1952 Helsinki Summer Games: Men's Triple Jump". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  3. Official Report, pp. 314–14.