Body whorl

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Apertural view of the shell of adult Tarebia granifera showing its pale brown body whorl and dark spire. Tarebia granifera shell.png
Apertural view of the shell of adult Tarebia granifera showing its pale brown body whorl and dark spire.
View of the spire side of the planispiral shell of the freshwater snail Anisus septemgyratus . The body whorl is the outermost complete revolution of the shell spiral Anisus septegyrus1pl.jpg
View of the spire side of the planispiral shell of the freshwater snail Anisus septemgyratus . The body whorl is the outermost complete revolution of the shell spiral
Three shells of the sea snail species Turritella communis . The body whorl shows in this side view as the last complete turn of the shell spiral, the part of the shell that leads up to the aperture Turritella communis Turmschnecke.jpg
Three shells of the sea snail species Turritella communis . The body whorl shows in this side view as the last complete turn of the shell spiral, the part of the shell that leads up to the aperture

The body whorl is part of the morphology of the shell in those gastropod mollusks that possess a coiled shell. The term is also sometimes used in a similar way to describe the shell of a cephalopod mollusk.

Morphology (biology) In biology, the form and structure of organisms

Morphology is a branch of biology dealing with the study of the form and structure of organisms and their specific structural features.

Gastropod shell part of the body of a gastropod or snail

The gastropod shell is part of the body of a gastropod or snail, a kind of mollusc. The shell is an exoskeleton, which protects from predators, mechanical damage, and dehydration, but also serves for muscle attachment and calcium storage. Some gastropods appear shell-less (slugs) but may have a remnant within the mantle, or the shell is reduced such that the body cannot be retracted within (semi-slug). Some snails also possess an operculum that seals the opening of the shell, known as the aperture, which provides further protection. The study of mollusc shells is known as conchology. The biological study of gastropods, and other molluscs in general, is malacology. Shell morphology terms vary by species group. An excellent source for terminology of the gastropod shell is "How to Know the Eastern Land Snails" by John B. Burch now freely available at the Hathi Trust Digital Library.

Cephalopod class of molluscs

A cephalopod is any member of the molluscan class Cephalopoda such as a squid, octopus or nautilus. These exclusively marine animals are characterized by bilateral body symmetry, a prominent head, and a set of arms or tentacles modified from the primitive molluscan foot. Fishermen sometimes call them inkfish, referring to their common ability to squirt ink. The study of cephalopods is a branch of malacology known as teuthology.

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In gastropods

In gastropods, the body whorl, or last whorl, is the most recently formed and largest whorl (or revolution) of a spiral or helical shell, terminating in the aperture. It is called the "body whorl" because most of the body of the soft parts of the animal fits into this whorl.

Whorl (mollusc)

A whorl is a single, complete 360° revolution or turn in the spiral growth of a mollusc shell. A spiral configuration of the shell is found in of numerous gastropods, but it is also found in shelled cephalopods including Nautilus, Spirula and the large extinct subclass of cephalopods known as the ammonites.

Spiral curve which emanates from a point, moving farther away as it revolves around the point

In mathematics, a spiral is a curve which emanates from a point, moving farther away as it revolves around the point.

Helix smooth space curve

A helix, plural helixes or helices, is a type of smooth space curve, i.e. a curve in three-dimensional space. It has the property that the tangent line at any point makes a constant angle with a fixed line called the axis. Examples of helices are coil springs and the handrails of spiral staircases. A "filled-in" helix – for example, a "spiral" (helical) ramp – is called a helicoid. Helices are important in biology, as the DNA molecule is formed as two intertwined helices, and many proteins have helical substructures, known as alpha helices. The word helix comes from the Greek word ἕλιξ, "twisted, curved".

The proportional size of the body whorl in gastropod shells differs greatly according to the actual shell morphology. For shells in which the rate of whorl expansion of each revolution around the axis is very high, the aperture and the body whorl are large, and the shell tends to be low spired. The shell of the abalone is a good example of this kind of shell.

Spire (mollusc)

A spire is a part of the coiled shell of molluscs. The spire consists of all of the whorls except for the body whorl. Each spire whorl represents a rotation of 360°. A spire is part of the shell of a snail, a gastropod mollusc, a gastropod shell, and also the whorls of the shell in ammonites, which are fossil shelled cephalopods.

Abalone any of a group of small to very large sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the family Haliotidae

Abalone is a common name for any of a group of small to very large sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the family Haliotidae.

The opposite tendency can sometimes create a high spire with very little whorl increase per revolution. In these instances, e.g. in the shell of Turritella species, both the body whorl and the aperture are relatively small.

<i>Turritella</i> genus of molluscs

Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae.

In mollusc shells where there is no elevation at all to the spire, and only moderate whorl expansion, the body whorl can sometimes still represent a large part of the shell, e.g. in some species in the family Planorbidae, such as the genus Segmentina .

Planorbidae family of molluscs

Planorbidae, common name the ramshorn snails or ram's horn snails, is a family of air-breathing freshwater snails, aquatic pulmonate gastropod molluscs. Unlike most molluscs, the blood of ram's horn snails contains iron-based hemoglobin instead of copper-based hemocyanin. As a result, planorbids are able to breathe oxygen more efficiently than other molluscs. The presence of hemoglobin gives the body a reddish colour. This is especially apparent in albino animals.

<i>Segmentina</i> genus of molluscs

Segmentina is a genus of very small, air-breathing, freshwater snails, aquatic gastropod mollusks or micromollusks in the family Planorbidae, the ramshorn snails.

In cephalopods

The body chamber or living chamber in shelled cephalopod mollusks is an equivalent space, and is also sometimes called the body whorl. It is the outermost or last chamber in the shell of a nautiloid or ammonoid. [1] The body of the animal occupies the living chamber, apart from the siphuncle which extends through the rest of the septa (the phragmocone) to provide buoyancy.

Nautiloid subclass of molluscs

Nautiloids are a large and diverse group of marine cephalopods (Mollusca) belonging to the subclass Nautiloidea that began in the Late Cambrian and are represented today by the living Nautilus and Allonautilus. Nautiloids flourished during the early Paleozoic era, where they constituted the main predatory animals, and developed an extraordinary diversity of shell shapes and forms. Some 2,500 species of fossil nautiloids are known, but only a handful of species survive to the present day.

Ammonoidea subclass of molluscs (fossil)

Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs, commonly referred to as ammonites, are more closely related to living coleoids than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species. The earliest ammonites appear during the Devonian, and the last species died out in the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event.

Siphuncle

The siphuncle is a strand of tissue passing longitudinally through the shell of a cephalopod mollusk. Only cephalopods with chambered shells have siphuncles, such as the extinct ammonites and belemnites, and the living nautiluses, cuttlefish, and Spirula. In the case of the cuttlefish, the siphuncle is indistinct and connects all the small chambers of that animal's highly modified shell; in the other cephalopods it is thread-like and passes through small openings in the walls dividing the chambers.

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<i>Hamites</i> (genus) genus of molluscs (fossil)

Hamites ("hook-like") is a genus of heteromorph ammonite that evolved late in the Aptian stage of the Early Cretaceous and lasted into the Cenomanian stage of the Late Cretaceous. The genus is almost certainly paraphyletic but remains in wide use as a "catch all" for heteromorph ammonites of the superfamily Turrilitoidea that do not neatly fit into the more derived groupings. In an attempt to identify clades within the genus, it has been divided up into a series of new genera or subgenera by different palaeontologists, including Eohamites, Hamitella, Helicohamites, Lytohamites, Planohamites, Psilohamites, and Sziveshamites.

<i>Baculites</i> genus of molluscs (fossil)

Baculites is an extinct genus of cephalopods with a nearly straight shell, included in the heteromorph ammonites. The genus, which lived worldwide throughout most of the Late Cretaceous, was named by Lamarck in 1799.

In anatomy, an apex is part of the shell of a mollusk. The apex is the pointed tip of the shell of a gastropod, scaphopod, or cephalopod.

Operculum (gastropod) A hard structure which closes the aperture of a gastropod when the animal retreats into the shell

The operculum, meaning little lid, is a corneous or calcareous anatomical structure like a trapdoor which exists in many groups of sea snails and freshwater snails, and also in a few groups of land snails; the structure is found in some marine and freshwater gastropods, and in a minority of terrestrial gastropods, including the families Helicinidae, Cyclophoridae, Aciculidae, Maizaniidae, Pomatiidae, etc.

In anatomy, a suture is a fairly rigid joint between two or more hard elements of an organism, with or without significant overlap of the elements.

<i>Aoteadrillia wanganuiensis</i> species of mollusc

Aoteadrillia wanganuiensis is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Horaiclavidae.

<i>Calliotropis aeglees</i> species of mollusc

Calliotropis aeglees is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Eucyclidae.

<i>Odostomia callimene</i> species of mollusc

Odostomia callimene is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Pyramidellidae, the pyrams and their allies.

<i>Bayerotrochus westralis</i> species of mollusc

Bayerotrochus westralis, commonly known as "Australia's split shell", is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Pleurotomariidae.

<i>Cantharidus antipoda</i> species of mollusc

Cantharidus antipoda is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Trochidae, the top snails.

<i>Microtis tuberculata</i> species of plant

Microtis tuberculata is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Trochidae, the top snails.

<i>Rugulina verrilli</i> species of mollusc

Rugulina verrilli is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Pendromidae.

<i>Buccinanops globulosus</i> species of mollusc

Buccinanops globulosus, common name the collared buccinum, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Nassariidae, the Nassa mud snails or dog whelks.

<i>Eucithara harpellina</i> species of mollusc

Eucithara harpellina is a small sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Mangeliidae.

<i>Azorilla lottae</i> species of mollusc

Azorilla lottae is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Raphitomidae.

References

  1. Trueman, A.E. (1940). The ammonite body-chamber, with special reference to the buoyancy and mode of life of the living ammonite. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society96: 339–383. doi : 10.1144/GSL.JGS.1940.096.01-04.14