Burundian franc

Last updated
Burundian franc
franc burundais  (French)
ISO 4217
CodeBIF
Denominations
Subunit
1/100 centime
Symbol FBu
Banknotes100, 500, 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000 francs
Coins1, 5, 10, 50 francs [1]
Demographics
User(s)Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
Issuance
Central bank Banque de la Republique du Burundi (Ibanki ya Republika Y'UBurundi)
Website www.brb.bi
Valuation
Inflation 4.4%
Source The World Factbook , 2014 est.

The franc (ISO 4217 code is BIF) is the currency of Burundi. It is nominally subdivided into 100 centimes, although coins have never been issued in centimes since Burundi began issuing its own currency. Only during the period when Burundi used the Belgian Congo franc were centime coins issued.

Contents

History

The franc became the currency of Burundi in 1916, when Belgium occupied the former German colony and replaced the German East African rupie with the Belgian Congo franc. Burundi used the currency of Belgian Congo until 1960, when the Rwanda and Burundi franc was introduced. Burundi began issuing its own francs in 1964.

There were plans to introduce a common currency, a new East African shilling, for the five member states of the East African Community by the end of 2015. As of November 2017, these plans have not yet materialized.

Coins

In 1965, the Bank of the Kingdom of Burundi issued brass 1 franc coins. In 1968, Bank of the Republic of Burundi took over the issuance of coins and introduced aluminum 1 and 5 francs and cupro-nickel 10 francs. The 5 and 10 francs have continuous milled edges. Second types of the 1 and 5 franc coins were introduced in 1976, featuring the coat of arms. In 2011 new 10 and 50 franc coins were introduced.

Burundian franc coins
ImageValueCompositionDiameterWeightThicknessEdgeIssued
1 franc Aluminum 18.9 mm.87 g1 mmReeded1976-2003
5 francs Aluminum 25 mm2.20 g2 mmReeded1976-2013
10 francs Copper-nickel 28 mm7.8 gReeded1968-1971
10 francs Nickel-plated steel27 mm6.2 g1.63 mmReeded2011
50 francs Nickel-plated steel29 mm7.2 g1.63 mmReeded2011

Banknotes

From February 1964 until 31 December 1965, notes of the Banque d’Emission du Rwanda et du Burundi (Issuing Bank of Rwanda and Burundi), in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1,000 francs, were overprinted with a diagonal hollow "BURUNDI" for use in the country. [2] These were followed in 1964 and 1965 by regular issues in the same denominations by the Banque du Royaume du Burundi (Bank of the Kingdom of Burundi).

In 1966, notes for 20 francs and above were overprinted by the Bank of the Republic of Burundi, replacing the word "Kingdom" with "Republic". Regular issues of this bank began in denominations of 10, 20, 50, 100, 500, 1,000 and 5,000 francs. 10 francs were replaced by coins in 1968. 2,000 franc notes were introduced in 2001, followed by 10,000 francs in 2004. Photographer Kelly Fajack's image of school kids in Burundi was used on the back of the Burundian 10,000 franc note. In 2015 Burundi launched a new series of banknotes. The 10, 20, and 50 franc banknotes have lost their legal tender status and the 100 franc banknote is the only note from the old series in circulation.

ImageValueDimensionsMain ColourDescriptionDate of
ObverseReverseObverseReverseprintingissuewithdrawallapse
Burundi 10Franc Front.jpg Burundi 10Franc Back.jpg 10 FrancsgreenMap and Coat of arms of Burundi Value, motto
Burundi 20 Franc Obverse.jpg Burundi 20 Franc Reverse.jpg 20 Francsred-pinkCoat of arms of Burundi
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixel per millimetre. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.
Banknotes of the Burundian franc
ImageValueObverseReverseRemark
50 francs (Mirongo Itanu Amafranga)Dugout canoeFishermen, hippo
100 francs (Ijana Amafranga)Prince RwagasoreHome constructionOriginal size: 150 x 70 mm.
100 francs (Ijana Amafranga)Prince RwagasoreHome constructionReduced size: 125 x 65 mm.
500 francs (Amajan Atanu Amafranga) President Melchior Ndadaye Banque de la République du Burundi (Ibanki ya Republika y'Uburundi; Bank of the Republic of Burundi) building, Bujumbura
500 francs (Amajan Atanu Amafranga)Navite artBanque de la République du Burundi (Ibanki ya Republika y'Uburundi; Bank of the Republic of Burundi) building, BujumburaOriginal size: 160 x 73 mm.
500 francs (Amajan Atanu Amafranga)Navite artBanque de la République du Burundi (Ibanki ya Republika y'Uburundi; Bank of the Republic of Burundi) building, BujumburaReduced size: 130 x 67 mm.
500 francs (Amajana Atanu Amafaranga)Crocodile, coat of arms and Flag of Burundi, coffee branchOutline of Burundi, boat on Lake Tanganiyka
1000 francs (Igihumbi Amafranga)CattleMonument de l'Unite, Bujumbura Original size: 170 x 76 mm.
1000 francs (Igihumbi Amafranga)CattleMonument de l'Unite,BujumburaReduced size: 135 x 69 mm.
1000 francs (Igihumbi Amafaranga)Bird, coat of arms and Flag of Burundi, cattleOutline of Burundi, banana trees
2000 francs (Ibihumbi Bibiri Amafranga)HarvestLakeA printed note showing white borders on each corner.
2000 francs (Ibihumbi Bibiri Amafranga)HarvestLakeFull printing on the note.
2000 francs (Igihumbi Bibiri Amafaranga)Antelope, coat of arms and Flag of Burundi, pineappleOutline of Burundi, fieldwork
5000 francs (Ibihumbi Bitanu Amafranga) Coat of arms of Burundi; Parliament of Burundi buildingPort of Bujumbura (Lake Tanganyika)Registration device on the lower center of the note; without the watermark area
5000 francs (Ibihumbi Bitanu Amafranga) Coat of arms of Burundi; Parliament of Burundi buildingPort of Bujumbura (Lake Tanganyika)Registration device moved to the left side of the note; watermark area added; addition of bull-shaped holographic patch
5000 francs (Ibihumbi Bitanu Amafranga) Coat of arms of Burundi; Parliament of Burundi buildingPort of Bujumbura (Lake Tanganyika)Full printing
5000 francs (Ibihumbi Bitanu Amafaranga)Buffalo, coat of arms and Flag of Burundi, dancers with drumsOutline of Burundi, landscape
10,000 francs (Ibihumbi Cumi Amafranga)Prince Rwagasore and President Melchior Ndadaye Classroom scene (based on a photograph by Kelly Fajack)
10,000 francs (Ibihumbi Cumi Amafaranga)Hippo, coat of arms and Flag of Burundi, Prince Rwagasore and President Melchior Ndadaye Outline of Burundi, plants

Historical exchange rates

On 3 January 2006, the franc was valued at 925 per $1. On January 1, 2008, the franc was valued at 1,129.40 per US dollar. On January 1, 2009, the franc was valued at 1,234.33 per U.S. dollar. On 10 July, the franc was valued at 1,587.60 per US dollar.

Current BIF exchange rates
From Google Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From Yahoo! Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From XE.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From OANDA: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From fxtop.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD

See also

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References

  1. Billets et Pièces en Circulation
  2. Linzmayer, Owen (2013). "Burundi". The Banknote Book. San Francisco, CA: www.BanknoteNews.com.