Cerrado mouse

Last updated

Cerrado mouse
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Cricetidae
Subfamily: Sigmodontinae
Genus: Thalpomys
Species:
T. cerradensis
Binomial name
Thalpomys cerradensis

The cerrado mouse (Thalpomys cerradensis) is a rodent species from South America. It is found in the Cerrado of Brazil.

Contents

Description

The cerrado mouse has a head-and-body length of more than 90 mm (3.5 in) and is larger than the only other species in the genus, the hairy-eared cerrado mouse (Thalpomys lasiotis). The fur is dense and rather stiff. The general colouring resembles some members of the Oligoryzomys genus. The dorsal pelage is reddish-brown, the individual hairs having blackish bases, orange central sections and blackish tips. There are also longer black guard hairs. The flanks and underparts are paler. The chin is buff and the eye-ring and cheeks orangish. The upper surfaces of the hindfeet are buff; they are small, with short outer toes and tiny claws. The tail, which is well-haired, is brown above and buff below. The diploid number is 36. [2]

Distribution and habitat

This mouse is restricted to the cerrado ecoregion in Brazil, occurring in the states of Bahia, Goiás and Mato Grosso. It inhabits open grassland, savannah with occasional trees and wetter grassland areas with palms. It readily recolonises areas affected by wildfires, and is at its most numerous less than two years later. [2]

Ecology

The cerrado mouse is most active soon after dusk and in the hours before dawn. In the state of Bahia, it is hardly ever caught in the live traps used by researchers for surveying small mammals, but its presence in the area is confirmed by its abundance in barn owl pellets (the undigested parts of their prey that the owls regurgitate). [2]

Status

This mouse has a wide range but a rather patchy distribution. [1] The cerrado grassland in which it lives is increasingly being threatened by the expansion of industrial-scale farming, the burning of vegetation for charcoal and the development of dams to provide irrigation. [3] Although populations of the mouse may be in general decline, the International Union for Conservation of Nature has assessed its conservation status as being of least concern because it believes the rate of population decline is not fast enough to justify placing it in a more threatened category. [1]

Related Research Articles

The white-tailed rat also known as the white-tailed mouse, is the only member of the subfamily Mystromyinae in the family Nesomyidae. This species is sometimes placed in the subfamily Cricetinae due to similarities in appearance between the white-tailed rat and hamsters, but molecular phylogenetic studies have confirmed that the two groups are not closely related. The subfamily Mystromyinae is sometimes placed within the family Muridae along with all other subfamilies of muroids.

Oligoryzomys flavescens, also known as the flavescent colilargo or yellow pygmy rice rat is a species of rodent in the genus Oligoryzomys of family Cricetidae. It is found in southern South America, occurring in southern Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and northeastern Argentina. Its karyotype has 2n = 64-66 and FNa = 66-70.

Oligoryzomys microtis, also known as the small-eared colilargo or small-eared pygmy rice rat, is a species of rodent in the genus Oligoryzomys of family Cricetidae. It is found in western Brazil, eastern Peru, Bolivia, and northern Paraguay.

Neacomys minutus, also known as the minute neacomys, the small bristly mouse, or the minute spiny mouse, is a rodent species from South America in the genus Neacomys. It is found in Brazil.

The hairy-eared cerrado mouse or hairy-eared akodont, is a rodent species from South America. It is found in the cerrado grassland of Brazil.

The Brazilian arboreal mouse is a South American rodent species of the family Cricetidae. It is found in the Atlantic Forest of southeast Brazil, often close to bamboo thickets. It can be distinguished from Rhagomys longilingua, the only other species in its genus, by the absence of spines among the hair. Formerly believed to be extinct after no sightings were recorded for over 100 years, the species has since been found in four localities. However, it is nowhere common, and all of these are forest fragments, and ongoing deforestation threatens the species' survival. For these reasons, the International Union for Conservation of Nature has assessed its conservation status as being "vulnerable".

The heath mouse is a species of mouse in the subfamily Murinae, the Old World rats and mice.

The pleasant bolo mouse, or pleasant akodont, is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found on grassland at high altitudes in Bolivia and Peru.

The rufous-bellied bolo mouse or white-chinned akodont, is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is found in Argentina and Bolivia where it inhabits the dry valleys of the eastern Andes. Its conservation status is listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as being of "least concern".

The dark bolo mouse or dark-furred akodont is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. There are two subspecies; one is found in eastern and central parts of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, and the other in coastal areas of southern Uruguay.

Mittendorf's lemniscomys or Mittendorf's striped grass mouse is a species of rodent in the family Muridae. It is endemic to Cameroon where it is found at high elevations on a single mountain. Its natural habitat is tropical high-altitude grassland. It faces no particular threats and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has listed it as being of "least concern".

Microryzomys altissimus, also known as the Páramo colilargo or highland small rice rat, is a species of rodent in the genus Microryzomys of family Cricetidae. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, but the Colombian segment may be a separate species.

Oligoryzomys destructor, also known as Tschudi's colilargo or the destructive pygmy rice rat, is a species of rodent in the genus Oligoryzomys of family Cricetidae. It is found along the eastern Andes from southern Colombia, through Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia into northern Argentina. Its karyotype has 2n = 60 and FNa = 76.

Oligoryzomys magellanicus, also known as the Patagonian colilargo and the Magellanic pygmy rice rat, is a species of rodent in the genus Oligoryzomys of the family Cricetidae. It is found in the southernmost parts of Argentina and Chile, including Tierra del Fuego and other outlying islands. Its karyotype has 2n = 54 and FNa = 66.

Ethiopian white-footed mouse Species of rodent

The Ethiopian white-footed mouse or white-footed stenocephalemys is a species of rodent in the family Muridae. It lives in Ethiopia and Eritrea. Its natural habitats are tropical moist montane forest and tropical high-altitude shrubland.

The little desert pocket mouse is a species of small rodent in the family Heteromyidae. It is endemic to Baja California in Mexico.

Southern pocket gopher species of rodent in the family Geomyidae, found in Mexico and the United States

The southern pocket gopher is a species of rodent in the family Geomyidae. It is found in Mexico and the United States, usually in high altitude grassland and shrubland. It feeds on plant material and has an extensive burrow above which is a large heap of earth on the surface of the ground.

The Huanchaca mouse or Huanchaca akodont is a rodent species in the family Cricetidae. It is known from savannas in an area at an elevation of 700 metres (2,300 ft) in Serrania Huanchaca, Noel Kempff Mercado National Park in eastern Bolivia.

The cerrado climbing mouse or long-tailed rhipidomys is an arboreal rodent species in the family Cricetidae from South America. It is found in primary or secondary forests of the cerrado and caatinga in central and eastern Brazil, and has also been seen in the Atlantic Forest. Its karyotype is 2n = 44, FN = 48-52. They are nocturnal animals and can be found in both tree canopies and on the ground.

The cerrado red-nosed mouse is a rodent species from South America. It is known from one locality in Bahia, eastern Brazil. The species was found in semi-deciduous forest in the cerrado ecoregion.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Marinhio-Filho, J.; Bonvicino, C.R.; Vieira E. (2017). "Thalpomys cerradensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2017: e.T21694A22339323. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  2. 1 2 3 Gardner, Alfred L.; Patton, James L.; Pardiñas, Ulyses F.J.; D’Elía, Guillermo (2015). Mammals of South America, Volume 2: Rodents. University of Chicago Press. pp. 274–275. ISBN   978-0-226-16957-6.
  3. Hilaire, Eric (December 22, 2011). "Disappearing Cerrado: Brazil's great untold environmental disaster". London: Guardian. Retrieved 2011-12-22.