Commander-in-Chief's Trophy

Last updated

Commander-in-Chief's Trophy
CICARMY.jpg
Showing the side of the current trophy holder, Army.
Air Force Falcons logo.svg Army West Point logo.svg Navy Athletics logo.svg
Air Force
Falcons
Army
Black Knights
Navy
Midshipmen
Originated:1972;50 years ago
Current Holder: Army

Air Force (20)
1982   1983
1985   1987
1989   1990
1991   1992
1994   1995
1997   1998
1999   2000
2001   2002
2010   2011
2014   2016
Army (9)
1972   1977
1984   1986
1988   1996
2017   2018
2020
Navy (16)
1973   1975
1978   1979
1981   2003
2004   2005
2006   2007
2008   2009
2012   2013
2015   2019
Shared Awards (5)
1974   1976   1980   1993   2021
Locations of Air Force, Army, and Navy

The Commander-in-Chief's Trophy is awarded to each season's winner of the American college football series among the teams of the U.S. Military Academy (Army Black Knights), the U.S. Naval Academy (Navy Midshipmen), and the U.S. Air Force Academy (Air Force Falcons).

Contents

The Navy–Air Force game is normally played on the first Saturday in October, the Army–Air Force game on the first Saturday in November, and the Army–Navy Game on the second Saturday in December. In the event of a tie, the award is shared, but the previous winner retains physical possession of the trophy. The Commander-in-Chief's Trophy and the Michigan MAC Trophy are the only NCAA Division I FBS triangular rivalry trophies awarded annually. The few others, such as the Florida Cup and the Beehive Boot, are contested sporadically.

Through 2021, the Air Force Falcons hold the most trophy victories with 20. The Navy Midshipmen have won 16. The Army Black Knights trail with 9. The trophy has been shared on five occasions, most recently in 2021.

History of the trophy

Air Force first played Army in 1959 and Navy in 1960. Prior to 1972, Air Force met Army in odd years and Navy in even years (and neither in 1961, 1962, 1964). 1972 was the first year the trophy was awarded, and Air Force has played both Army and Navy every year since. Because Air Force played Army and not Navy in 1971, the Army-Air Force game is the longest uninterrupted intersectional rivalry in college football by one game over the Air Force-Navy game.

The Commander-in-Chief's trophy was the brainchild of Air Force General George B. Simler, a former Air Force Academy athletic director who envisioned the trophy as a means to create an annual series of football games for the Air Force Academy against the Military Academy and the Naval Academy. First awarded in 1972 by President Richard Nixon, the trophy itself is jointly sponsored by the alumni associations of the three academies. [1] [2]

The trophy is named for the U.S. President, who is the Commander-in-Chief of all U.S. military services under the U.S. Constitution. The President has personally awarded the trophy on a number of occasions. During the 1980s, for instance, President Ronald Reagan presented the award in an annual White House ceremony. In 1996, President Bill Clinton presented the trophy to the Army team at Veterans Stadium after the Army–Navy Game. From 2003 to 2007, President George W. Bush presented the trophy to Navy teams at ceremonies in the White House.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the winner of the trophy, if bowl eligible, was granted an invitation to the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tennessee. [3]

Navy was the first to five wins in 1981, while Army won its fifth in 1988 and Air Force in 1989 to knot the series (five wins each with three shares). Air Force has led since their win in 1990, and dominated through 2002, with sixteen wins to Army's six. Winless in the series for over two decades, Navy reeled off seven consecutive sweeps from 2003 through 2009 to draw close.

In the annual series, Air Force plays a home game and a road game, usually both on campus, hosting Navy in even-numbered years and Army in odd years. Exceptions have included Air Force playing Navy at Jack Kent Cooke Stadium in Maryland in 1999 and Army at Globe Life Field in Texas in 2021. [4] [5] Army–Navy is a neutral site game, usually in a major eastern metropolitan area and most frequently in Philadelphia. Home games for Army–Navy are usually the result of circumstance, such as the 1942 and 1943 editions being moved to Annapolis and West Point due to World War II and 2020 at Army's campus because of the COVID-19 pandemic. [6]

The other two federal service academies – the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and U.S. Merchant Marine Academy – do not participate in this competition. They are approximately one-quarter the size of the three Department of Defense (DoD) academies and compete in Division III athletics, so they do not compete against the DoD military academies in most sports. The Coast Guard Bears and Merchant Marine Mariners have an annual football rivalry for the Secretaries Cup.

The trophy has been the subject of at least one "spirit mission," or prank, leading up to a service academy rivalry game. In late November 2019, a group of Naval Academy midshipmen stole the CIC trophy from West Point (who had won it the previous year) and transported it to Annapolis. The prank was revealed when the trophy was placed on display at noon meal in front of the Brigade of Midshipmen at USNA. The event received significant attention on social media platforms. Upon West Point leadership learning of the incident, the trophy was promptly returned to USMA. It is not known how the trophy was stolen and transported, and neither Academy provided an official comment on the incident. Navy went on to win the CIC trophy following a 31–7 victory against Army on December 14, 2019.

The trophy

The trophy itself stands 2.5 feet (0.76 m) high and weighs 170 lb (77 kg). The design consists of three silver footballs in a pyramid-like arrangement, set on a circular base, with three arc-shaped sections cut out – one for each academy. In each of the cut-out areas stands a silver figurine of the mascot of one of the academies, in front of small, engraved plates denoting which years the respective academy has won the trophy. Beneath each of the three silver footballs is the crest of one of the three academies.

When Air Force has possession of the trophy, it is displayed in a glass case in the Cadet Fieldhouse, the indoor sports complex at the Air Force Academy. When Navy has possession of the trophy, it is displayed in a glass case in Bancroft Hall, the Midshipmen's dormitory. When Army possesses the trophy, it is housed in a glass case outside the football offices in the Army West Point Sports Hall of Fame, part of the Kimsey Athletic Center in Michie Stadium.

Game results and trophy winners

In the event of a shared award, the previous year's winner retains custody of the trophy.

Air Force victoriesArmy victoriesNavy victoriesShared trophies and tied gamesNo game played, no trophy awarded and future events
SeasonTrophy WinnerAir Force – Navy scoreAir Force – Army scoreArmy – Navy score
Before Trophy Established
1890–1958N/ANot playedNot playedSee Army-Navy Game
1959N/ANot played13–13 [lower-alpha 1] 43–12 [lower-alpha 2]
1960N/A35–3 [lower-alpha 3] Not played17–12 [lower-alpha 2]
1961N/ANot playedNot played13–7 [lower-alpha 2]
1962N/ANot playedNot played34–14 [lower-alpha 2]
1963N/ANot played14–10 [lower-alpha 4] 21–15 [lower-alpha 2]
1964N/ANot playedNot played11–8 [lower-alpha 2]
1965N/ANot played14–3 [lower-alpha 4] 7–7 [lower-alpha 2]
1966N/A15–7 [lower-alpha 5] Not played20–7 [lower-alpha 2]
1967N/ANot played10–7 [lower-alpha 5] 19–14 [lower-alpha 2]
1968N/A26–20 [lower-alpha 4] Not played21–14 [lower-alpha 2]
1969N/ANot played13–6 [lower-alpha 6] 27–0 [lower-alpha 2]
1970N/A26–3 [lower-alpha 7] Not played11–7 [lower-alpha 2]
1971N/ANot played20–7 [lower-alpha 5] 24–23 [lower-alpha 2]
Trophy Established
1972Army(1)21–17 [lower-alpha 5] 17–14 [lower-alpha 6] 23–15 [lower-alpha 2]
1973Navy(1)42–6 [lower-alpha 8] 43–10 [lower-alpha 5] 51–0 [lower-alpha 2]
1974Shared (Navy retained trophy)(1)19–16 [lower-alpha 5] 17–16 [lower-alpha 6] 19–0 [lower-alpha 2]
1975Navy(2)17–0 [lower-alpha 7] 33–3 [lower-alpha 5] 30–6 [lower-alpha 2]
1976Shared (Navy retained trophy)(2)13–3 [lower-alpha 5] 24–7 [lower-alpha 6] 38–10 [lower-alpha 2]
1977Army(2)10–7 [lower-alpha 8] 31–6 [lower-alpha 5] 17–14 [lower-alpha 2]
1978Navy(3)37–8 [lower-alpha 5] 28–14 [lower-alpha 6] 28–0 [lower-alpha 2]
1979Navy(4)13–9 [lower-alpha 8] 28–7 [lower-alpha 5] 31–7 [lower-alpha 2]
1980Shared (Navy retained trophy)(3)21–20 [lower-alpha 5] 47–24 [lower-alpha 6] 33–6 [lower-alpha 9]
1981Navy(5)30–13 [lower-alpha 8] 7–3 [lower-alpha 5] 3–3 [lower-alpha 9]
1982Air Force(1)24–21 [lower-alpha 5] 27–9 [lower-alpha 6] 24–7 [lower-alpha 9]
1983Air Force(2)44–17 [lower-alpha 8] 41–20 [lower-alpha 5] 42–13 [lower-alpha 10]
1984Army(3)29–22 [lower-alpha 5] 24–12 [lower-alpha 6] 28–11 [lower-alpha 9]
1985Air Force(3)24–7 [lower-alpha 8] 45–7 [lower-alpha 5] 17–7 [lower-alpha 9]
1986Army(4)40–6 [lower-alpha 5] 21–11 [lower-alpha 6] 27–7 [lower-alpha 9]
1987Air Force(4)23–13 [lower-alpha 8] 27–10 [lower-alpha 5] 17–3 [lower-alpha 9]
1988Army(5)34–24 [lower-alpha 5] 28–15 [lower-alpha 6] 20–15 [lower-alpha 9]
1989Air Force(5)35–7 [lower-alpha 8] 29–3 [lower-alpha 5] 19–17 [lower-alpha 11]
1990Air Force(6)24–7 [lower-alpha 5] 15–3 [lower-alpha 6] 30–20 [lower-alpha 9]
1991Air Force(7)46–6 [lower-alpha 8] 25–0 [lower-alpha 5] 24–3 [lower-alpha 9]
1992Air Force(8)18–16 [lower-alpha 5] 7–3 [lower-alpha 6] 25–24 [lower-alpha 9]
1993Shared (Air Force retained trophy)(4)28–24 [lower-alpha 8] 25–6 [lower-alpha 5] 16–14 [lower-alpha 11]
1994Air Force(9)43–21 [lower-alpha 5] 10–6 [lower-alpha 6] 22–20 [lower-alpha 9]
1995Air Force(10)30–20 [lower-alpha 8] 38–20 [lower-alpha 5] 14–13 [lower-alpha 9]
1996Army(6)20–17 [lower-alpha 5] 23–7 [lower-alpha 6] 28–24 [lower-alpha 9]
1997Air Force(11)10–7 [lower-alpha 8] 24–0 [lower-alpha 5] 39–7 [lower-alpha 11]
1998Air Force(12)49–7 [lower-alpha 5] 35–7 [lower-alpha 6] 34–30 [lower-alpha 9]
1999Air Force(13)19–14 [lower-alpha 12] 28–0 [lower-alpha 5] 19–9 [lower-alpha 9]
2000Air Force(14)27–13 [lower-alpha 5] 41–27 [lower-alpha 6] 30–28 [lower-alpha 13]
2001Air Force(15)24–18 [lower-alpha 12] 34–24 [lower-alpha 5] 26–17 [lower-alpha 9]
2002Air Force(16)48–7 [lower-alpha 5] 49–30 [lower-alpha 6] 58–12 [lower-alpha 11]
2003Navy(6)28–25 [lower-alpha 12] 31–3 [lower-alpha 5] 34–6 [lower-alpha 14]
2004Navy(7)24–21 [lower-alpha 5] 31–22 [lower-alpha 6] 42–13 [lower-alpha 14]
2005Navy(8)27–24 [lower-alpha 8] 27–24 [lower-alpha 5] 42–23 [lower-alpha 14]
2006Navy(9)24–17 [lower-alpha 5] 43–7 [lower-alpha 6] 26–14 [lower-alpha 14]
2007Navy(10)31–20 [lower-alpha 8] 30–10 [lower-alpha 5] 38–3 [lower-alpha 13]
2008Navy(11)33–27 [lower-alpha 5] 16–7 [lower-alpha 6] 34–0 [lower-alpha 14]
2009Navy(12)16–13 (OT) [lower-alpha 8] 35–7 [lower-alpha 5] 17–3 [lower-alpha 14]
2010Air Force(17)14–6 [lower-alpha 5] 42–22 [lower-alpha 6] 31–17 [lower-alpha 14]
2011Air Force(18)35–34 (OT) [lower-alpha 8] 24–14 [lower-alpha 5] 27–21 [lower-alpha 12]
2012Navy(13)28–21 (OT) [lower-alpha 5] 41–21 [lower-alpha 6] 17–13 [lower-alpha 14]
2013Navy(14)28–10 [lower-alpha 8] 42–28 [lower-alpha 5] 34–7 [lower-alpha 14]
2014Air Force(19)30–21 [lower-alpha 5] 23–6 [lower-alpha 6] 17–10 [lower-alpha 13]
2015Navy(15)33–11 [lower-alpha 8] 20–3 [lower-alpha 5] 21–17 [lower-alpha 14]
2016Air Force(20)28–14 [lower-alpha 5] 31–12 [lower-alpha 6] 21–17 [lower-alpha 13]
2017Army(7)48–45 [lower-alpha 8] 21–0 [lower-alpha 5] 14–13 [lower-alpha 14]
2018Army(8)35–7 [lower-alpha 5] 17–14 [lower-alpha 6] 17–10 [lower-alpha 14]
2019Navy(16)34–25 [lower-alpha 8] 17–13 [lower-alpha 5] 31–7 [lower-alpha 14]
2020Army(9)40–7 [lower-alpha 5] 10–7 [lower-alpha 6] 15–0 [lower-alpha 6]
2021Shared (Army retained trophy)(5)23–3 [lower-alpha 8] 21–14 (OT) [lower-alpha 15] 17–13 [lower-alpha 16]
2022TBD13–10 [lower-alpha 5] November 5 [lower-alpha 15] December 10 [lower-alpha 14]
SeasonTrophy winnerAir Force – NavyAir Force – ArmyArmy – Navy
Records since 1972Air Force: 30–21  (.588)Air Force: 34–16  (.680)Navy: 31–18–1  (.630)
All-time RecordsAir Force: 33–22  (.600)Air Force: 37–18–1  (.670)Navy: 62–53–7  (.537)
Records since Trophy Established
TeamTrophiesLastWLTPct.
 Air Force 20 2016 64370.634
Navy16 2019 52481.520
Army9 2020 34651.345

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Army–Navy Game</span> Annual American football game between the US Military Academy and the US Naval Academy

The Army–Navy Game is an American college football rivalry game between the Army Black Knights of the United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point, New York, and the Navy Midshipmen of the United States Naval Academy (USNA) at Annapolis, Maryland. The Black Knights, or Cadets, and Midshipmen each represent their service's oldest officer commissioning sources. As such, the game has come to embody the spirit of the interservice rivalry of the United States Armed Forces. The game marks the end of the college football regular season and the third and final game of the season's Commander-in-Chief's Trophy series, which also includes the Air Force Falcons of the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) near Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Bill the Goat is the mascot of the United States Naval Academy. The mascot is a live goat and is also represented by a costumed midshipman. There is also a bronze statue of the goat in the north end zone of Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. This statue also plays a role in "Army Week" traditions.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Air Force Falcons football</span> College football team representing the United States Air Force Academy

The Air Force Falcons football program represents the United States Air Force Academy in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level. Air Force has been a member of the Mountain West Conference since its founding in 1999. The Falcons play their home games at Falcon Stadium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Troy Calhoun has been the team's head coach since 2007.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Navy Midshipmen football</span> American athletic football program of the nations US military Naval Academy

The Navy Midshipmen football team represents the United States Naval Academy in NCAA Division I FBS college football. The Naval Academy completed its final season as an FBS independent school in 2014, and became a single-sport member of the American Athletic Conference beginning in the 2015 season. The team has been coached by Ken Niumatalolo since December 2007. Navy has 19 players and three coaches in the College Football Hall of Fame and won the college football national championship in 1926 according to the Boand and Houlgate poll systems. The 1910 team also was undefeated and unscored upon. The mascot is Bill the Goat.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Army Black Knights football</span> American athletic football program of the nations army Military Academy

The Army Black Knights football team, previously known as the Army Cadets, represents the United States Military Academy in college football. Army is a Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) member of the NCAA. The Black Knights play home games in Michie Stadium with a capacity of 38,000 at West Point, New York. The Black Knights are coached by Jeff Monken who is in his ninth season as head coach. Army claims three national championships from 1944 to 1946. In addition, major selectors have awarded Army championships in 1914 and 1916. Army has produced 24 players and 4 coaches in the College Football Hall of Fame, 37 consensus All-Americans, and 3 Heisman Trophy winners.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ken Niumatalolo</span> American football player and coach (born 1965)

Kenneth Va'a Niumatalolo is an American football coach and former player. Niumatalolo played college football at the University of Hawaii. As a quarterback he led Hawaii to their first postseason bowl game in 1989. Niumatalolo is the second person of Polynesian descent to be named head coach of an NCAA Division I FBS college football program and the first ethnic Samoan collegiate head coach on any level. Niumatalolo was inducted into the Polynesian Football Hall of Fame on January 23, 2014. He is the current head coach at the Naval Academy and the winningest coach in the history of Navy football.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Navy–Notre Dame football rivalry</span> American college football rivalry

The Navy–Notre Dame football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Navy Midshipmen football team of the United States Naval Academy and Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team of the University of Notre Dame. It was played annually from 1927 to 2019, which made it the longest uninterrupted intersectional rivalry in college football, the third-longest uninterrupted college football rivalry overall, as well as the second-longest never-interrupted rivalry in Division I college football (FBS). Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 game was canceled, ending these lengthy streaks, even though both schools still played a fall season schedule in 2020.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2004 Navy Midshipmen football team</span> American college football season

The 2004 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy (USNA) as an independent during the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was led by third-year head coach Paul Johnson. The Midshipmen finished the regular season with a 9–2 record, the first time since the 1963 season that Navy had won nine or more games in a season. Wins over Army and the Air Force Falcons secured Navy's second consecutive Commander-in-Chief's Trophy. Navy secured a berth in the 2004 Emerald Bowl when the Pacific-10 Conference did not have enough teams to fill its bowl obligations. The other tie-in was with the Mountain West Conference (MWC), and the Midshipmen ended up playing the New Mexico Lobos. They won the game with a score of 34–19, finishing with a 14-minute, 26-play drive that set the record for the longest drive in a college football game. The win gave the Midshipmen a final record of 10–2, the first time since the 1905 season that the Midshipmen finished with ten or more wins.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2014 Navy Midshipmen football team</span> American college football season

The 2014 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy as an independent in the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by seventh year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. This was the final year as an Independent before the school joins the American Athletic Conference. They finished the season 8–5. They were invited to the Poinsettia Bowl where they defeated San Diego State.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2017 Navy Midshipmen football team</span> American college football season

The 2017 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 2017 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by tenth-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The Midshipmen competed as a member of the West Division of the American Athletic Conference and were third-year members of the conference. They finished the season 7–6 overall and 4–4 in AAC play to tie for third place in the West Division. They were invited to the Military Bowl, where they defeated Virginia, 49–7.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1970 Air Force Falcons football team</span> American college football season

The 1970 Air Force Falcons football team represented the United States Air Force Academy as an independent during the 1970 NCAA University Division football season. Led by thirteenth-year head coach Ben Martin, the Falcons compiled a record of 9–3, outscored their opponents 366–239, and finished No. 16 in the AP Poll. They won their first eight games and were ranked seventh in the AP Poll for three weeks. Air Force played their home games at Falcon Stadium in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Army–Navy Cup</span>

The Army–Navy Cup is an annual men's college soccer match between the United States Military Academy (Army) and the United States Naval Academy (Navy). Since its inaugural game in 2012, the match has been played on a neutral venue, much like its college football counterpart. Like the American football rivalry, the Cup is also held in the Philadelphia metro area. However, the cup is held at Subaru Park, the home ground of Major League Soccer's Philadelphia Union.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2018 Army Black Knights football team</span> American college football season

The 2018 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy as an independent in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Black Knights were led by fifth-year head coach Jeff Monken and played their home games at Michie Stadium. Following their 28–14 victory over Colgate in Week 12, Army entered the AP Poll at No. 23 and the Coaches' Poll at No. 24, the first time Army had entered the national rankings since finishing the 1996 season at No. 25 in the AP and No. 24 in the Coaches'. On December 2, Army accepted an invite to participate in the Armed Forces Bowl against the Houston Cougars of the American Athletic Conference. On December 8, Army defeated its archrival Navy by a score of 17–10, increasing their Army-Navy Game win streak to three in a row and winning the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy for the second straight year. With the win the Black Knights also secured their second straight 10-win season, the first time that had been accomplished in the Academy's long and storied history. In the Armed Forces Bowl, they defeated Houston by a score of 70–14 to tie NCAA bowl game records for points scored and margin of victory. Their 11 wins are the most in one season in program history. As a result of his team's 2018 accomplishments, Coach Monken was awarded the George Munger Collegiate Coach of the Year Award by the Maxwell Football Club, the Vince Lombardi College Football Coach of the Year Award by the Lombardi Foundation, and the President's Award by the Touchdown Club of Columbus. Army finished the season with a ranking of No. 19 in the AP Poll and No. 20 in the Coaches' Poll, their highest finish in both polls since Pete Dawkins's Heisman Trophy-winning season in 1958 where the Cadets finished No. 3 in both polls. Following the completion of the season, the Black Knights were awarded the 2018 Lambert Trophy by the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) and Metropolitan New York Football Writers, signifying them as the best team in the East in Division I FBS. This was the eighth overall time the Lambert Trophy had been awarded to Army, and the first since 1958.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2018 Air Force Falcons football team</span> American college football season

The 2018 Air Force Falcons football team represented the United States Air Force Academy in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Falcons were led by twelfth-year head coach Troy Calhoun and played their home games at Falcon Stadium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. They were members of the Mountain West Conference in the Mountain Division. They finished the season 5–7, 3–5 in Mountain West play to finish in fourth place in the Mountain Division.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2018 Navy Midshipmen football team</span> American college football season

The 2018 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by eleventh-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. Navy was a member of the American Athletic Conference (AAC) in the West Division. The Midshipmen finished the season 3–10, the team's worst record since 2002. They went 2–6 in AAC play to tie fifth place in the West Division.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2020 Air Force Falcons football team</span> American college football season

The 2020 Air Force Falcons football team represented the United States Air Force Academy in the 2020 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Falcons were led by 14th-year head coach Troy Calhoun and played their home games at Falcon Stadium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. They competed as members of the Mountain West Conference.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2021 Army Black Knights football team</span> United States Military Academy in the 2021 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2021 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 2021 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Black Knights were led by eighth-year head coach Jeff Monken and played their home games at Michie Stadium. They competed as an independent. The Black Knights finished the season with a record of 9–4, sharing the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy with Navy and Air Force after all three service academies finished with 1–1 records against each other. They were invited to the Armed Forces Bowl where they defeated Missouri, 24–22.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2021 Navy Midshipmen football team</span> United States Naval Academy in the 2020 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2021 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy as a member of the American Athletic Conference (AAC) in the 2021 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by 14th-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2022 Army Black Knights football team</span> American college football season

The 2022 Army Black Knights football team will represent the United States Military Academy in the 2022 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Black Knights will be led by ninth-year head coach Jeff Monken and play their home games at Michie Stadium in West Point, New York. They will compete as an independent. The Black Knights have a tie-in to the Independence Bowl for the 2022 season.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2022 Navy Midshipmen football team</span> American college football season

The 2022 Navy Midshipmen football team represents the United States Naval Academy in the 2022 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen play their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland, and compete in the American Athletic Conference. They are led by fifteen-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo.

References

  1. Staff Sgt. Raymond Hoy (April 18, 2011). "Falcons bring home Commander-in-Chief's Trophy". www.af.mil. Archived from the original on July 24, 2012.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  2. Kyle Meadows (July 24, 2008). "The Top Ten College Football Rivalry Trophies". Bleacher Report.
  3. John Cavanaugh (November 12, 1989). "College Football: Boston College Surprises Army". The New York Times.
  4. Orton, Kathy (February 11, 1999). "Air Force, Navy set for Cooke Stadium". The Washington Post . Retrieved November 4, 2021.
  5. Collins, Sean (November 3, 2021). "College football takes center stage at Globe Life Field with this weekend's Army-Air Force matchup". The Dallas Morning News . Retrieved November 4, 2021.
  6. Maisel, Ivan (December 10, 2020). "Can't stop, won't stop: Army-Navy plays on despite different location and pandemic". ESPN.com . ESPN . Retrieved November 4, 2021.