Communications of the ACM

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The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) is an international learned society for computing. It was founded in 1947, and is the world's largest scientific and educational computing society. The ACM is a non-profit professional membership group, claiming nearly 100,000 student and professional members as of 2019. Its headquarters are in New York City.

Computer science Study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation

Computer science is the study of processes that interact with data and that can be represented as data in the form of programs. It enables the use of algorithms to manipulate, store, and communicate digital information. A computer scientist studies the theory of computation and the practice of designing software systems.

Edsger W. Dijkstra Dutch computer scientist

Edsger Wybe Dijkstra was a Dutch systems scientist, programmer, software engineer, science essayist, and pioneer in computing science. A theoretical physicist by training, he worked as a programmer at the Mathematisch Centrum (Amsterdam) from 1952 to 1962. A university professor for much of his life, Dijkstra held the Schlumberger Centennial Chair in Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin from 1984 until his retirement in 1999. He was a professor of mathematics at the Eindhoven University of Technology (1962–1984) and a research fellow at the Burroughs Corporation (1973–1984).

Turing Award computer science award

The ACM A.M. Turing Award is an annual prize given by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) to an individual selected for contributions "of lasting and major technical importance to the computer field". The Turing Award is generally recognized as the highest distinction in computer science and the "Nobel Prize of computing".

Leslie Lamport American computer scientist

Leslie B. Lamport is an American computer scientist. Lamport is best known for his seminal work in distributed systems, and as the initial developer of the document preparation system LaTeX and the author of its first manual. Leslie Lamport was the winner of the 2013 Turing Award for imposing clear, well-defined coherence on the seemingly chaotic behavior of distributed computing systems, in which several autonomous computers communicate with each other by passing messages. He devised important algorithms and developed formal modeling and verification protocols that improve the quality of real distributed systems. These contributions have resulted in improved correctness, performance, and reliability of computer systems.

The Gödel Prize is an annual prize for outstanding papers in the area of theoretical computer science, given jointly by European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS) and the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computational Theory. The award is named in honor of Kurt Gödel. Gödel's connection to theoretical computer science is that he was the first to mention the "P versus NP" question, in a 1956 letter to John von Neumann in which Gödel asked whether a certain NP-complete problem could be solved in quadratic or linear time.

Sartaj Sahni Indian computer scientist, a specialist in data structures

Professor Sartaj Kumar Sahni is a computer scientist based in the United States, and is one of the pioneers in the field of data structures. He is a distinguished professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the University of Florida.

Peter J. Denning American computer scientist

Peter James Denning is an American computer scientist and writer. He is best known for pioneering work in virtual memory, especially for inventing the working-set model for program behavior, which addressed thrashing in operating systems and became the reference standard for all memory management policies. He is also known for his works on principles of operating systems, operational analysis of queueing network systems, design and implementation of CSNET, the ACM digital library, codifying the great principles of computing, and most recently for the book The Innovator's Way, on innovation as a set of learnable practices.

Michael Irwin Jordan is an American scientist, professor at the University of California, Berkeley and researcher in machine learning, statistics, and artificial intelligence. He is one of the leading figures in machine learning, and in 2016 Science reported him as the world's most influential computer scientist.

Edmund Callis Berkeley was an American computer scientist who co-founded the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in 1947. His 1949 book Giant Brains, or Machines That Think popularized cognitive images of early computers. He was also a social activist who worked to achieve conditions that might minimize the threat of nuclear war.

ACM Queue is a bimonthly computer magazine founded and published by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). The magazine was established in 2003. Steve Bourne helped found the magazine when he was president of the ACM and is chair of the editorial board. The magazine is produced by computing professionals and is intended for computing professionals. It is available only in electronic form and is available on the Internet on subscription basis. Some of the articles published in Queue are also included in ACM's monthly magazine, Communications of the ACM, in the Practitioner section.

Noga Alon Israeli mathematician

Noga Alon is an Israeli mathematician and a professor of mathematics at Princeton University noted for his contributions to combinatorics and theoretical computer science, having authored hundreds of papers.

David Peleg is an Israeli computer scientist. He is a professor at the Weizmann Institute of Science, holding the Norman D. Cohen Professorial Chair of Computer Sciences, and the present dean of the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Weizmann Institute. His main research interests are algorithms, computer networks, and distributed computing. Many of his papers deal with a combination of all three.

Peter A. Wegner was a computer scientist who made significant contributions to both the theory of object-oriented programming during the 1980s and to the relevance of the Church–Turing thesis for empirical aspects of computer science during the 1990s and present. In 2016, Wegner wrote a brief autobiography for Conduit, the annual Brown University Computer Science department magazine.

ACM Computing Surveys is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Association for Computing Machinery. It publishes survey articles and tutorials related to computer science and computing. The journal was established in 1969 with William S. Dorn as founding editor-in-chief.

Joseph S. B. Mitchell American computer scientist

Joseph S. B. Mitchell is an American computer scientist and mathematician. He is Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics and Research Professor of Computer Science at Stony Brook University.

Monika Henzinger is a German computer scientist, and is a former director of research at Google. She is currently a professor at the University of Vienna. Her expertise is mainly on algorithms with a focus on data structures, algorithmic game theory, information retrieval, search algorithms and Web data mining. She is married to Thomas Henzinger and has three children.

Takao Nishizeki is a Japanese mathematician and computer scientist who specializes in graph algorithms and graph drawing.

Marvin Stein (1924-2015) was a mathematician and computer scientist, and the "father of computer science" at the University of Minnesota.

Zehra Meral Özsoyoglu is a Turkish-American computer scientist specializing in databases, including research on query languages, database model, and indexes, and applications of databases in science, bioinformatics, and medical informatics. She is Andrew R. Jennings Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at Case Western Reserve University.

References

  1. Gotlieb, Calvin C. (1 January 2008). "A time to retrospect and prospect". Communications of the ACM. 51 (1): 26–29. Bibcode:1985CACM...28...22S. doi:10.1145/1327452.1327469. ISSN   0001-0782.
  2. Alain Chesnais (2013). "ACM's Annual Report for FY12". Communications of the ACM. 56 (1): 11–15. doi:10.1145/2398356.2398362.
  3. Rosen's vita at history.computer.org
  4. "Publications". Association for Computing Machinery. Retrieved 2011-12-05.
  5. Boisvert, Ronald F. (2000). "Mathematical software: past, present, and future". Mathematics and Computers in Simulation. 54 (4): 227–241. arXiv: cs/0004004 . doi:10.1016/s0378-4754(00)00185-3.