Earl of Sussex

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Earl of Sussex is a title that has been created several times in the Peerages of England, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. The early Earls of Arundel (up to 1243) were often also called Earls of Sussex.

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The fifth creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1717 in favour of Talbot Yelverton, 2nd Viscount Longueville. The Yelverton family descended from Sir Christopher Yelverton, Speaker of the House of Commons from 1597 to 1598. Sir Christopher's grandson and namesake, Christopher Yelverton, was created a baronet, of Easton Mauduit in the County of Northampton, in the Baronetage of England in 1641. He was succeeded by his son, Sir Henry, the second Baronet. He married Susan Longueville, suo jure 13th Baroness Grey de Ruthyn. Their eldest son, Charles, succeeded in both the baronetcy and barony. However, he died young and was succeeded by his younger brother, Henry, the fifteenth Baron. In 1690 he was created Viscount Longueville in the Peerage of England. His son, Henry, the aforementioned second Viscount, was created Earl of Sussex in 1717. Henry's two sons, George and Henry, both succeeded in the earldom. The baronetcy, viscountcy and earldom became extinct on Henry's death in 1799. He was succeeded in the barony of Grey de Ruthyn by his grandson, Henry, the nineteenth Baron, the son of his daughter Lady Barbara Yelverton by Colonel Edward Thoroton Gould. See Baron Grey de Ruthyn for further history of this title.

Earls of Sussex; First creation (1282)

Earls of Sussex; Second creation (1529)

Arms of Radcliffe: Argent, a bend engrailed sable Radcliffe arms.svg
Arms of Radcliffe: Argent, a bend engrailed sable
Monument to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Radcliffe Earls of Sussex in St Andrew's Church, Boreham, Essex Church of St Andrew's, Boreham, Essex - Earls of Sussex tomb chest 1.jpg
Monument to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Radcliffe Earls of Sussex in St Andrew's Church, Boreham, Essex

Subsidiary titles: Viscount FitzWalter (1525), Baron FitzWalter (1295) (1st–5th Earls)

Baron Savile of Pontefract (1628)

Earls of Sussex, Third creation (1644)

Subsidiary titles: Viscount Savile (1628), Baron Castlebar (1628)

Earls of Sussex; Fourth creation (1674)

Arms of Lennard: Or, on a fess gules three fleurs-de-lys of the field Lennard (BaronDacre) Arms.svg
Arms of Lennard: Or, on a fess gules three fleurs-de-lys of the field

Subsidiary title: Baron Dacre (1321)

Yelverton baronets, of Easton Mauduit (1641)

Barons Grey de Ruthyn (1324)

Viscounts Longueville (1690)

Henry Yelverton, 1st Viscount Longueville Henry Yelverton, 1st Viscount Longueville.jpg
Henry Yelverton, 1st Viscount Longueville

Earls of Sussex; Fifth creation (1717)

Earls of Sussex; Sixth creation (1874)

See also

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References

  1. Burke, Sir Bernard, The General Armory, London, 1884, p.601
  2. "No. 24098". The London Gazette . 26 May 1874. p. 2779.