Electoral district of Town of Melbourne

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Town of Melbourne
New South WalesLegislative Council
Melbourne map 1855.jpeg
Melbourne, 1855
State New South Wales
Created1843
Abolished1851
Namesake Melbourne
Electors 556 (in 1843) [1]
Coordinates 37°49′S144°58′E / 37.817°S 144.967°E / -37.817; 144.967 Coordinates: 37°49′S144°58′E / 37.817°S 144.967°E / -37.817; 144.967

The Electoral district of Town of Melbourne [2] (later known as Electoral district of City of Melbourne) [3] was an electorate of the New South Wales Legislative Council before it became part of the Colony of Victoria on 1 July 1851.

Contents

History

Settlers of the Port Phillip District had wanted representation in the New South Wales Legislative Council for some time. In 1843 a representative for the Town of Melbourne (and five members for the Electoral district of Port Phillip). [2] [4] were elected; "But the colonists were not satisfied with government from and by Sydney". [5] [1]

On 1 July 1851, the Port Phillip district (which included Melbourne) was separated from New South Wales under provisions of the Australian Colonies Government Act 1850, and became the Colony of Victoria and the Victorian Legislative Council was created. [6]

Members

Town of Melbourne
MemberTermRef
Henry Condell   1 Jun 1843 – 1 Feb 1844 [7]
Joseph Robinson 12 Mar 1844 – 20 Jun 1848 [8]
City of Melbourne
Earl Grey    1 Jul 1848 – 31 Oct 1850 [9]
William Westgarth   1 Nov 1850 – 20 Jun 1851   [10]

Election results

1843

1843 New South Wales colonial election, 17 June:
Town of Melbourne [11]
CandidateVotes%
Henry Condell 29553.06
Edward Curr 26146.94
Total votes556 100.00

1844

Condell resigned in February 1844. [7]

1844 Town of Melbourne by-election
12 March [12]
CandidateVotes%
Joseph Robinson unopposed 

1848

1848 New South Wales colonial election, 26 July:
City of Melbourne [13]
CandidateVotes%
Earl Grey (elected)29574
John Foster 10226
Total votes397 100
Earl Grey, the Colonial Secretary in London, had never set foot in the colony and there was no suggestion he met the property requirement for election. He was nominated and elected as part of the campaign for independence, protesting against government by New South Wales. [14]

1850

As Earl Grey had never set foot in the colony, he did not attend the Legislative Council and his seat was vacated by his absence on 31 October 1850. [9]

1850 City of Melbourne by-election
7 November [15]
CandidateVotes%
William Westgarth unopposed 

Related Research Articles

Electoral district of Port Phillip

The Electoral district of Port Phillip was an electorate of the New South Wales Legislative Council before it became the separate colony of Victoria (Australia) on 1 July 1851. At the time, some members of the Council were elected and the balance were appointed by the Governor. The Town of Melbourne returned one member while the Port Phillip district, which covered the rest of what became Victoria after its separation in 1851, returned five members.

This is a list of members of the New South Wales Legislative Council from 1843 to 1851. The 1843 Electoral Act prescribed 36 members, 24 to be elected, 6 appointed by virtue of their office and 6 nominated. The appointments and elections were for five year terms and thus occurred in 1843,</ref> and 1848. The Speaker was Alexander Macleay until 19 May 1846 and then Charles Nicholson. The parliament was dissolved on 30 June 1851 as a result of the 1851 Electoral Act which increased the number of members in the Council to 54.

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The 1843 New South Wales colonial election, the first in the colony, was held between 15 June and 3 July 1843, to elect 24 members from 18 electoral districts. Each district returned 1 member except for Port Phillip which returned 5 members while County of Cumberland, and Town of Sydney returned 2 each.

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The Electoral district of Counties of Hunter, Brisbane and Bligh and from 1851, Phillip, Brisbane and Bligh, was an electorate of the partially elected New South Wales Legislative Council, created for the first elections for the Council in 1843. The electoral district included the north western counties of Hunter, Brisbane, Bligh. Polling took place in the towns of Jerrys Plains, nearby Merton, Muswellbrook, Scone, as far north as Murrurundi, Watson's on the Macdonald River, Cassilis and as far west as Montefiores. With the expansion of the Council in 1851 Phillip, the other north west county, was added to the district, replacing Hunter which was combined with the lower Hunter county of Northumberland as Counties of Northumberland and Hunter.

The Electoral district of Counties of St Vincent and Auckland was an electorate of the partially elected New South Wales Legislative Council, created for the first elections for the Council in 1843. The electoral district consisted of the two south coast counties of St Vincent and Auckland, extending from Jervis Bay south to Eden and west to Braidwood. Polling took place at Jervis Bay, Ulladulla, Braidwood, Broulee and Eden. The district was abolished with the expansion of the Council in 1851. St Vincent was combined with Murray to the west as the Counties of Murray and St Vincent while Auckland became part of the Pastoral District of Maneroo.

The Electoral district of Counties of Murray, King and Georgiana and from 1851, Counties of King and Georgiana was an electorate of the partially elected New South Wales Legislative Council, created for the first elections for the Council in 1843. The electoral district included the south western counties of Murray, King and Georgiana. Polling took place at Queanbeyan, Yass and Wheeo, which were within the counties and the nearby towns of Braidwood, Goulburn and Bathurst. The towns of Queanbeyan and Yass were removed from the district with the expansion of the Council in 1851 and combined with Braidwood and Goulburn to form the Southern Boroughs. The rural area of the County of Murray became part of the Counties of Murray and St Vincent and leaving the district to cover the remaining rural areas of the Counties of King and Gergiana.

The Electoral district of Counties of Roxburgh, Phillip and Wellington and from 1851, Roxburgh and Wellington, was an electorate of the partially elected New South Wales Legislative Council, created for the first elections for the Council in 1843. The electoral district included the western counties of Roxburgh, Phillip, Wellington County. Polling took place at Montefiores, Mudgee, Bathurst and Hartley. The County of Phillip was removed from the district with the expansion of the Council in 1851 and became part of the Counties of Phillip, Brisbane and Bligh.

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The Electoral district of County of Northumberland and from 1851, Northumberland and Hunter, was an electorate of the partially elected New South Wales Legislative Council, created for the first elections for the Council in 1843. The County of Northumberland was bounded by the part of the Hawkesbury River to the south, the Macdonald River to the south-west, and the Hunter River to the north, however the electoral district did not include the towns of East Maitland, West Maitland and Newcastle which made up the district of Northumberland Boroughs. Polling took place at Gosford, Newcastle, East Maitland, Wollombi, Singleton and Watson's on the Macdonald River. The County of Hunter was added to the district with the expansion of the Council in 1851 and elected two members.

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The 1848 New South Wales colonial election was held between 29 July and 2 August 1848. This election was for 24 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Council and it was conducted in 15 single-member constituencies, two 2-member constituencies and one 5-member constituency, all with a first past the post system. The Legislative Council was a hybrid system with 36 members, 24 elected, 6 appointed by virtue of their office and 6 nominated. The appointments and elections were for five year terms.<

The 1851 New South Wales colonial election was held between 12 and 25 September. This election was for 36 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Council. The 1848 election had been for 5 year terms however the parliament had been reconstituted following the separation of Victoria. At the same time the council was expanded from 36 to 54 members. The Legislative Council was a hybrid system with 18 appointed members and 36 elected. The Port Philip districts had 6 elected members, which meant there were an additional 18 seats. There were 3 new districts for the northern regions of what would later become Queensland, Stanley, Stanley Boroughs and the pastoral districts of Moreton, Wide Bay, Burnett, and Maranoa and 7 new pastoral districts in western New South Wales. The other 8 additional seats were distributed among the nineteen counties of New South Wales.

References

  1. 1 2 M.M.H. Thompson. The Seeds of Democracy: Early Elections in Colonial New South Wales. p. 151.
  2. 1 2 "Electoral Act 1843 No 1a" (PDF), (NSW) via NSW Legislation
  3. Melbourne was declared a city on 25 June 1847. Lewis, Miles (1995). Melbourne: the city's history and development (2nd ed.). Melbourne: City of Melbourne. p. 25. ISBN   0-949624-71-3.
  4. "List of voters". Port Phillip Gazette . 13 May 1843. p. 4. Retrieved 29 October 2021 via Trove.
  5. Coghlan, Timothy Augustine; Levey, George Collins (1911). "Victoria (Australia)"  . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica . Vol. 28 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 37–44, see pages 42-43.
  6. "Victorian Electoral Act of 1851 No 3a" (PDF), (NSW) via NSW Legislation
  7. 1 2 "Mr Henry Condell (1797-1871)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  8. "Mr Joseph Phelps Robinson (1815-1848)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  9. 1 2 "The Hon. Henry (Earl Grey) Grey". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  10. "Mr William Westgarth (1815-1889)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  11. "Borough of Melbourne". The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser . 8 July 1843. p. 4. Retrieved 23 May 2019 via Trove.
  12. "Town election". Port Phillip Gazette . 16 March 1844. p. 4. Retrieved 28 May 2019 via Trove.
  13. "Election of a representative for the City of Melbourne". Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal . 29 July 1848. p. 2. Retrieved 26 May 2019 via Trove.
  14. "Contemporary opinions on the late election movements". Geelong Advertiser . 29 July 1848. p. 2. Retrieved 23 May 2019 via Trove.
    "Apology for Earl Grey's election". The Port Phillip Patriot and Morning Advertiser . 31 July 1848. p. 2. Retrieved 26 May 2019 via Trove.
  15. "Melbourne election". The Sydney Morning Herald . 14 November 1850. p. 2. Retrieved 28 May 2019 via Trove.