First in Flight Centennial commemorative coins

Last updated

The First in Flight Centennial commemorative coins are a series of commemorative coins issued by the United States Mint in 2003. The coins, issued in half dollar, dollar, and eagle ($10) denominations, commemorate the 100th anniversary of the first controlled flight of a powered heavier-than-air aircraft. [1] The coins were authorized by Public Law 105-124.

Contents

Half dollar

First in Flight Centennial half dollar
2003 First Flight Centennial Clad Proof (Obverse).png 2003 First Flight Centennial Clad Proof (Reverse).png
ObverseReverse

The First In Flight half dollar was struck in the standard half dollar composition of nickel-clad copper. The obverse of the coin features the Wright Brothers Monument, while the reverse features an image of the Wright Flyer making its historic flight. 750,000 half dollars were authorized, of which 109,710 proof and 57,122 uncirculated coins were minted at the Philadelphia Mint. [2]

Silver dollar

First in Flight Centennial silver dollar
2003 First Flight Centennial Dollar Obverse.jpg 2003 First Flight Centennial Dollar Reverse.jpg
ObverseReverse

The First in Flight dollar coin was struck in 90% silver and 10% copper, similar to the standard composition of the dollar coin up until 1935. The obverse features profiles of the Wright brothers, while the reverse features an image of the Wright Flyer over the dunes at Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Public Law 105-124 authorized 500,000 silver dollars, of which 190,240 proof and 53,533 uncirculated coins were produced at the Philadelphia Mint. [2]

Gold eagle

First in Flight Centennial gold eagle
2003 First Flight Centennial Gold Proof O.jpg 2003 First Flight Centennial Eagle Reverse.jpg
ObverseReverse

A $10 eagle coin was also produced, with a composition of 90% gold, 6% silver, and 4% copper. This was the first time a commemorative eagle was produced with this composition since 1985, and as of 2019 was the last time a commemorative eagle was produced with this composition. α The obverse features a portrait of Orville and Wilbur Wright, while the reverse features an eagle in flight above an image of the Wright Flyer. 100,000 gold eagles were authorized, of which 21,676 proof and 10,009 uncirculated coins were minted at Philadelphia. [2]

See also

Notes

A commemorative eagle was issued in 2018 with a composition of 99.99% gold, and another eagle is scheduled for release in 2020 with that composition.

Related Research Articles

Quarter (United States coin) Current denomination of United States currency

The quarter, short for quarter dollar, is a United States coin worth 25 cents, one-quarter of a dollar. It has a diameter of 0.955 inch (24.26 mm) and a thickness of 0.069 inch (1.75 mm). The coin sports the profile of George Washington on its obverse, and its reverse design has changed frequently. It has been produced on and off since 1796 and consistently since 1831.

Coins of the United States dollar were first minted in 1792. New coins have been produced annually and they make up a valuable aspect of the United States currency system. Today, circulating coins exist in denominations of 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, 50¢, and $1.00. Also minted are bullion and commemorative coins. All of these are produced by the United States Mint. The coins are then sold to Federal Reserve Banks which in turn are responsible for putting coins into circulation and withdrawing them as demanded by the country's economy.

United States Mint Produces circulating coinage for the United States

The United States Mint is a bureau of the Department of the Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion. It does not produce paper money; that responsibility belongs to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The first United States Mint was created in Philadelphia in 1792, and soon joined by other centers, whose coins were identified by their own mint marks. There are currently four active coin-producing mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point.

United States commemorative coins

The United States Mint has minted numerous commemorative coins to commemorate persons, places, events, and institutions since 1848. Many of these coins are not intended for general circulation, but are still legal tender. The mint also produces commemorative medals, which are similar to coins but do not have a face value, and therefore are not legal tender.

United States Bicentennial coinage Three US coins minted in 1975–1976

The United States Bicentennial coinage is a set of circulating commemorative coins, consisting of a quarter, half dollar and dollar struck by the United States Mint in 1975 and 1976. Regardless of when struck, each coin bears the double date 1776–1976 on the normal obverses for the Washington quarter, Kennedy half dollar and Eisenhower dollar. No coins dated 1975 of any of the three denominations were minted.

American Gold Eagle Gold bullion coin of the United States

The American Gold Eagle is an official gold bullion coin of the United States. Authorized under the Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985, it was first released by the United States Mint in 1986. Because the term "eagle" also is the official United States designation for pre-1933 ten dollars gold coins, the weight of the bullion coin is typically used when describing American Gold Eagles to avoid confusion. This is particularly true with the 1/4-oz American Gold Eagle, which has a marked face value of ten dollars.

Eisenhower Centennial silver dollar

The Eisenhower Commemorative silver dollar is a United States commemorative coin minted in 1990 to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the birth of General/President Dwight D. Eisenhower. This coin is not to be confused with the Eisenhower dollar or the Eisenhower Presidential dollar which were regular issue American coins.

Library of Congress bimetallic eagle Commemorative ten-dollar coin of the United States

The Library of Congress bimetallic eagle is a modern U.S. commemorative coin issued in the ten dollar denomination. It is the first gold and platinum bimetallic coin to be issued by the United States Mint. It was issued in proof and business strike qualities.

Half eagle Gold coin issued by the United States face valued at five dollars

The half eagle is a United States coin that was produced for circulation from 1794 to 1929 and in commemorative and bullion coins since 1983. Composed almost entirely of gold, it has a face value of five dollars. Its production was authorized by The Act of April 5, 1792, and it was the first gold coin minted by the United States.

In 1983 and 1984, the United States Mint issued a series of commemorative coins to commemorate the 1984 Summer Olympic games held in Los Angeles. These coins were authorized by Public Law 97-220.

Apollo 11 50th Anniversary commemorative coins US commemorative coin

The Apollo 11 50th Anniversary commemorative coins were issued by the United States Mint in 2019 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first crewed landing on the Moon by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Consisting of a gold half eagle, two different sizes of silver dollars, and a copper-nickel clad half dollar, each of the four was issued in proof condition, with all but the larger silver dollar also issued in uncirculated. The gold coins were struck at the West Point Mint, the silver at the Philadelphia Mint and the base metal half dollars at the mints in Denver and San Francisco.

United States Proof Set

The United States Mint Proof Set, commonly known as the Proof Set in the United States, is a set of proof coins sold by the United States Mint. The proof set is popular with coin collectors as it is an affordable way to collect examples of United States coinage in proof condition.

The Leif Ericson Millennium commemorative coins are a series of coins issued in 2000 by the United States Mint to commemorate the 1,000th anniversary of Leif Ericson's discovery of the Americas.

Korean War Memorial silver dollar U.S. commemorative silver dollar

The Korean War Memorial silver dollar is a commemorative silver dollar issued by the United States Mint in 1991. The coin commemorated the 38th anniversary of the end of the Korean War.

Dolley Madison silver dollar

The Dolley Madison silver dollar is a commemorative silver dollar issued by the United States Mint in 1999. The obverse depicts Dolley Madison, and the reverse shows the Madison family house Montpelier. Some proceeds benefited the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The coin was authorized by Public Law 104-329.

Library of Congress silver dollar 2000 US commemorative coin

Library of Congress silver dollar is a commemorative coin issued by the United States Mint in 2000. The coin was part of a two-coin series authorized by Pub.L. 105–268 (text)(pdf) commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Library of Congress.

Statue of Liberty commemorative coins Series of United States commemorative coins

The Statue of Liberty commemorative coins are a series of commemorative coins which were issued by the United States Mint in 1986.

The United States Constitution Bicentennial commemorative coins are a series of commemorative coins which were issued by the United States Mint in 1987.

The Christopher Columbus Quincentenary commemorative coins are a series of commemorative coins which were issued by the United States Mint in 1992.

The Mount Rushmore Anniversary commemorative coins are a series of commemorative coins which were issued by the United States Mint in 1991.

References

  1. "First in Flight Centennial Commemortive Coi | U.S. Mint". www.usmint.gov. Retrieved 2019-05-10.
  2. 1 2 3 "2003 First Flight Centennial | U.S. Mint". www.usmint.gov. Retrieved 2019-05-11.