Jeremy Kyle

Last updated

Jeremy Kyle
Jeremy kyle seated.jpg
Kyle at Radio Festival in 2010
Born (1965-07-07) 7 July 1965 (age 56)
Education
Occupation
  • Broadcaster
  • writer
Years active1996–present
Television
Spouse(s)
    Kirsty Rowley
    (m. 1989;div. 1991)
      Carla Germaine
      (m. 2003;div. 2016)
Children5

Jeremy Kyle (born 7 July 1965) [1] is an English broadcaster and writer. He is known for hosting the tabloid talk show The Jeremy Kyle Show on ITV from 2005 to 2019. [2] [3] Kyle hosted a US version of his eponymous show, which ran for two seasons beginning in 2011. [4]

Contents

Early life

Kyle was born in Reading, Berkshire, [1] and is of Scottish descent. [5] His father was an accountant and personal secretary to the Queen Mother for forty years. Kyle has an older brother, Nick, who Kyle said later became a drug addict. [6]

He attended the Reading Blue Coat School, a boys' independent school in Sonning, Berkshire. [7]

Kyle's first job was at Marks & Spencer. [8] He studied History and Sociology at the University of Surrey in Guildford. [9]

Radio career

From 1986 to 1995, Kyle worked as a life insurance salesman, recruitment consultant, and radio advertising salesman. [7] He then became a radio presenter and after working at Orchard FM in Taunton, Somerset, and Leicester Sound in Leicester, he was signed by Kent's Invicta FM in 1996. In 1997, he joined BRMB in Birmingham, presenting the shows Late & Live and Jezza's Jukebox. [10]

In 2000, Kyle moved to the Century FM network, taking this format with him. The show was called Jezza's Confessions. It was broadcast between 9 pm and 1 am. He won a Sony Award for Late & Live in 2001. [7] On 1 July 2002, he made his first broadcast on Virgin Radio, presenting Jezza's Virgin Confessions every weekday from 8 pm to midnight. In mid-2003, he broadcast the show from 9 pm to 1 am every weekday, and in January 2004 the show went out from 10 pm to 1 am, Sunday to Thursday. He left Virgin Radio in June 2004. From 5 September 2004, Kyle presented the Confessions show on London's Capital FM. The new programme aired Sunday to Thursday from 10 pm to 1 am with live calls on relationship issues of all kinds. Capital Confessions came to an end on 22 December 2005 to make way for The Jeremy Kyle Show, a similar show which ran from January 2006 to December 2006.

In late 2007, Kyle began a new show (The Jeremy Kyle Show), broadcasting across GCap Media's One Network, of which Orchard FM, Invicta FM and BRMB, his previous employers, were a part. The programme differed from his previous shows in that he interviewed celebrities. Kyle also began broadcasting a new programme, on Essex FM, in November 2007. Kyle joined Talksport on 21 September 2008 to present a lunchtime sports show every Sunday called The Jeremy Kyle Sunday Sports Show. As a result of Talksport's Premiership coverage on a Sunday, Kyle's show was cancelled, and he left the station. [11]

In early September 2021, it was announced that Kyle would present talkRADIO Drivetime between Monday and Thursday. The show will air between 4-7pm starting on September 13. [12]

Television career

In 2005, Kyle moved his format to ITV with a programme also entitled The Jeremy Kyle Show .

In September 2007, Manchester judge Alan Berg [13] described the show as "trash" which existed to "titillate bored members of the public with nothing better to do". [14]

In February 2008, The Jeremy Kyle Show was again criticised in court after a man who found out during the recording of a show that he was not the father of his wife's child later pointed an air rifle at her. [15] Other shows Kyle is involved with include Kyle's Academy, a ten-part series for ITV daytime which first aired on 18 June 2007. [15] A team of experts (life coaches and psychotherapists), headed by Kyle, takes five people and works with them over an intensive fortnight to help them on the road to a happier more fulfilled life. Kyle has also presented Half Ton Hospital, a show about morbidly obese people in the United States.[ citation needed ]

On 19 April 2011, Kyle began presenting a documentary series called Military Driving School, where he visited the Defence School of Transport in Yorkshire, following a group of new recruits as they undergo training as front line military drivers. In 2011, he was the presenter of the ITV game show High Stakes . [16]

Since 2015, Kyle has presented two series of The Kyle Files, a primetime show on ITV. [17]

In 2015, he fronted a ten-part daytime series called Jeremy Kyle's Emergency Room . The show returned for a second series in March 2016. [18] [19]

From March 2016 until 2017 Kyle guest presented ITV's breakfast programme Good Morning Britain . [20] [21]

In May 2019, the recording and broadcasting of The Jeremy Kyle Show was suspended after a guest committed suicide shortly after appearing in an episode of the series. A review of the episode occurred before any resumption of the programme's transmission, [2] and on 15 May 2019, ITV confirmed that the series had ceased production with immediate effect. [22] It has since been revealed that more guests had taken their own lives following their appearances in this and another programme hosted by Kyle on Channel 5, Britain's Worst Husband. [23]

Kyle began developing a new show for ITV three months after his show was cancelled. ITV's director of television Kevin Lygo said a pilot episode was being made with Kyle, but the new show wouldn't air in The Jeremy Kyle Show's old timeslot. [24]

Personal life

He stated in his book I'm Only Being Honest, published in 2009, that he has obsessive–compulsive disorder. [25]

Kyle's first marriage to Kirsty Rowley in 1989 was short-lived because of his addiction to gambling, [26] which made him accumulate a debt which peaked at £12,000, and took some years to pay off. [6] [25] He married Carla Germaine in 2002. The couple separated amicably in 2015; they had three children. [27] Their divorce was confirmed the following February. [28] Kyle also has a daughter from his first marriage. [26]

In late 2012, Kyle was diagnosed with testicular cancer. [29] He received chemotherapy and underwent surgery to remove the affected testicle. [8]

In February 2018, Kyle announced his engagement to Vicky Burton, his children's former nanny. [30]

In 2021, Kyle stated that he had been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder after The Jeremy Kyle Show was axed. [31]

Filmography

YearTitleRole
2005–2019 The Jeremy Kyle Show Presenter
2006An Audience with Coronation StreetGuest appearance
2007 Coronation Street Confidential
2009 The Fattest Man in Britain Presenter
2010 This Morning Summer
2011Military Driving School
High Stakes
2011–2013 The Jeremy Kyle Show USA
2013 Sunday Scoop Guest presenter
2013–2015 Ant & Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway Various roles
2014Celebrity Jeremy KylePresenter
2015–2017 Jeremy Kyle's Emergency Room
2015–2019The Kyle Files
2015World Championships SnookerCelebrity player
2016–2017 Good Morning Britain Guest presenter
2019Kyle's HousePresenter
Cold Feet Himself

Related Research Articles

Robert Edward Mills is an English comedian and broadcaster, who has appeared in the television series In Bed with Medinner and The Show.

Chris Tarrant English broadcaster

Christopher John Tarrant, is an English broadcaster. He presented the ITV children's television show Tiswas from 1974 to 1981, and the game show Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? from 1998 to 2014. He was a Capital Radio host from 1984 to 2004.

Richard Bacon (broadcaster) English television and radio presenter

Richard Paul Bacon is an English television and radio presenter. He is best known for being sacked as presenter of the children's show Blue Peter because of his illicit drug use. He has since worked as a reporter or presenter on numerous television shows, including The Big Breakfast, and on ITV's Good Morning Britain as a stand-in presenter, and on radio stations including Capital FM, Xfm London and BBC Radio Five Live. In 2016, Bacon became the presenter of The National Geographic Channel's reboot of its documentary/panel discussion TV series, Explorer.

Kate Lawler is an English television personality, presenter, model and DJ. She became the first female winner of Big Brother UK after winning the third series of the reality series in 2002. Since Big Brother, she has presented various radio shows including Capital FM and Virgin Radio. She has also appeared in television series including Celebrity Wrestling and Love Island.

Dermot OLeary English television presenter

Sean Dermot Fintan O'Leary Jr. is an English television presenter who currently works for ITV and BBC Radio 2. His radio career began when he worked as a disc jockey at Essex Radio, but he is best known for being the presenter of The X Factor (UK) on ITV, a position he has held every year since 2007 until its cancellation in 2021 with the exception of 2015, during which he stepped down to pursue other ventures.

Terence Christian is a British broadcaster, journalist and author. He has presented several national television series in the UK including Channel 4's late night entertainment show The Word (1990–1995) and six series of ITV1 moral issues talk show It's My Life (2003–2008). He has also been a regular guest panelist on the topical Channel 5 series The Wright Stuff and Jeremy Vine.

David Allan "Kid" Jensen is a Canadian-born British radio DJ and television presenter. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, Jensen began as a radio DJ on Radio Luxembourg. Jensen was later a broadcaster for the BBC from 1976 to 1984, as a host on BBC Radio 1 and presenter on the TV music programme Top of the Pops from 1977 to 1984. Jensen has also hosted and presented for Capital FM and ITV among other stations.

Jon Holmes is a British comedian, writer, presenter and broadcaster known for his work on such programmes as The Now Show, Listen Against, along with both music and speech radio. He has appeared on numerous television programmes.

Colin Murray British broadcaster

Colin Murray is a Northern Irish radio and television presenter. In 2010, he became host of BBC Television's Match of the Day 2 on BBC Two, while still anchoring shows on BBC Radio 5 Live, including 5 Live Sport and Fighting Talk and was still presenting on BBC Radio Ulster. He has previously hosted regular Channel 5 television and BBC Radio 1 shows. In 2007, he was named 'Music Broadcaster of the Year' at the Sony Radio Academy Awards.

Eamonn Holmes Television presenter

Eamonn Holmes is an Irish broadcaster and former journalist from Northern Ireland. Holmes co-presented GMTV for twelve years between 1993 and 2005, before presenting Sky News Sunrise for eleven years between 2005 and 2016. From 2006 until January 2021, he co-hosted This Morning with his wife Ruth Langsford on Fridays, and since 2021, during the school holidays only. He has also presented How the Other Half Lives (2015–present) and It's Not Me, It's You (2016) for Channel 5. Holmes is an advocate of numerous charities and causes including Dogs Trust, Variety GB and Northern Ireland Kidney Patients' Association.

Russell "Russ" Williams is an English radio DJ from Blackpool, primarily known for his long-running shows on Virgin Radio, and since 2008 on Absolute Radio, the re-launched version of Virgin Radio.

Andrew Simon Hodgson is primarily known as an auctioneer/presenter on the British television shopping channel bid tv.

James Whale (radio presenter) English radio DJ (born 1951)

Michael James Whale is an English radio personality, television presenter, podcast host and author. He gained initial prominence in the 1980s as the host of The James Whale Radio Show on Radio Aire in Leeds, which was simulcast on national television. From 1995 to 2008, Whale hosted a night time radio show on talkSPORT, followed by stints on LBC 97.3 and various BBC radio stations.

<i>The Jeremy Kyle Show</i> British tabloid talk show presented by Jeremy Kyle

The Jeremy Kyle Show is a British tabloid talk show which was presented by Jeremy Kyle and produced by ITV Studios. It premiered on the ITV network on 4 July 2005, and ran for seventeen series until its cancellation on 10 May 2019. During its broadcast, it was the most popular programme in ITV's daytime schedule, regularly broadcast on weekday mornings and reaching an audience of 1 million viewers. The programme served as a replacement for Trisha Goddard's chat show, following its move to Channel 5 in 2004.

Jonathan Charles Gaunt is an English radio talk show presenter, TV personality, newspaper columnist, social commentator and spokesman.

Matt Smith is a British broadcaster, who worked with ITV Sport between 2001 and 2015. He currently presents BT Sport's coverage of Premier League, FA Cup, Champions League, Europa League, Conference Football and England Under 21 matches.

The Mother of All Talk Shows is a British talk radio show hosted by Scottish politician George Galloway on Radio Sputnik, having formerly aired on talkRADIO, a British commercial radio station owned by Wireless Group. The programme aired every Friday between 7pm and 10pm. The original show aired each Friday and Saturday night between 10pm and 1am from March 2006 and March 2010 on talkRADIO's parent station, Talksport.

Robert Rinder British barrister and television personality

Robert Michael Rinder is a British criminal barrister and television personality. In 2014, while still a practising barrister, he began hosting the reality courtroom series Judge Rinder. In 2019, he also began hosting the Channel 4 series The Rob Rinder Verdict.

A timeline of notable events relating to Absolute Radio and its spin-off stations, and its predecessor Virgin 1215/Virgin Radio.

This is a timeline of Capital London, from its initial period as an Independent Local Radio station for Greater London to the present day CHR network serving most of the UK.

References

  1. 1 2 Philby, Charlotte (12 June 2010). "My Secret Life: Jeremy Kyle, chat show host, 44". The Independent. Archived from the original on 12 May 2012. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  2. 1 2 "Jeremy Kyle Show taken off air after participant dies". Sky News. 13 May 2019. Archived from the original on 13 May 2019. Retrieved 13 May 2019.
  3. "ITV axes Jeremy Kyle Show after death of participant". The Guardian. 15 May 2019. Archived from the original on 15 May 2019. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  4. "Will Jeremy Kyle's talkshow cut it in the US?". The Guardian. 2011.
  5. The Jeremy Kyle Show (22 April 2017). "Best of the Scottish – The Jeremy Kyle Show" . Retrieved 8 February 2018 via YouTube. I'm half Scottish.
  6. 1 2 "Interview: Jeremy Kyle". The Scotsman. 29 May 2009. Archived from the original on 23 October 2018. Retrieved 16 May 2019.
  7. 1 2 3 Silver, James (29 May 2006). "Call me Jezza". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 13 May 2019.
  8. 1 2 Greenstreet, Rosanna (2 July 2010). "Q&A: Jeremy Kyle". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 4 July 2018. Retrieved 3 July 2018.
  9. Burrell, Ian. "Jeremy Kyle: Judge, jury and exploiter?". The Independent . Archived from the original on 27 October 2014. Retrieved 16 September 2014.
  10. "Jeremy 'Jezza' Kyle". NMP Live. Archived from the original on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 9 March 2009.
  11. Radio Shows Archived 25 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine . talksport.co.uk
  12. "Jeremy Kyle returns to full-time radio with Drivetime on talkRADIO". RadioToday. 4 September 2021. Retrieved 10 September 2021.
  13. Burrell, Ian (3 April 2013) The Jeremy Kyle show turned Mick Philpott into a celebrity', The Independent; accessed 6 October 2014.
  14. "Judge blasts Kyle show as 'trash'". BBC News. 25 September 2007. Archived from the original on 11 October 2007. Retrieved 4 October 2007.
  15. 1 2 "Attack after Kyle show 'tragedy'" Archived 17 February 2008 at the Wayback Machine , BBC News, 13 February 2008; retrieved 24 August 2011.
  16. "Jeremy Kyle to host ITV1 gameshow 'High Stakes'" Archived 22 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine . Metro.co.uk, 19 July 2011; retrieved 24 August 2011.
  17. "The Kyle Files". ITV Press Centre. Archived from the original on 7 January 2015. Retrieved 19 December 2015.
  18. "Jeremy Kyle to host medical show The Emergency Room". Digital Spy. 17 April 2015. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 18 April 2015.
  19. "Series 2 – Episode 1 – Kyle Files – The ITV Hub". 13 January 2016. Archived from the original on 13 January 2016.
  20. Jeremy Kyle is replacing Piers Morgan on Good Morning Britain over Easter Archived 5 December 2017 at the Wayback Machine Sam Warner, Digital Spy, 24 March 2016
  21. Jeremy Kyle, Richard Madeley and Eamonn Holmes will replace Piers Morgan on Good Morning Britain this summer Archived 29 November 2017 at the Wayback Machine Joe Anderton, Digital Spy, 28 July 2017
  22. "The Jeremy Kyle Show axed by ITV". BBC News. 15 May 2019. Archived from the original on 15 May 2019. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  23. Walker, Amy (19 May 2019). "Jeremy Kyle: more TV show guests killed themselves, it emerges". The Guardian.
  24. "Jeremy Kyle working on pilot for new ITV show". 23 August 2019. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  25. 1 2 "Jeremy Kyle: I lick phones". Manchester Evening News. 6 June 2009. Archived from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 16 May 2019.
  26. 1 2 "Jeremy Kyle's controversial talk show made him a daytime TV stalwart". ITVB. 15 May 2019. Archived from the original on 16 May 2019. Retrieved 16 May 2019.
  27. O'Neill, Sean (25 September 2015). "Don't pry into my life, pleads Jeremy Kyle". The Times. Archived from the original on 13 May 2019. Retrieved 13 May 2019.(subscription required)
  28. "Jeremy Kyle and wife Carla divorce". ITV News. 11 February 2016. Archived from the original on 13 May 2019. Retrieved 13 May 2019.
  29. Gladwell, Amy "Daytime TV host Jeremy Kyle is treated for cancer" Archived 4 February 2013 at the Wayback Machine , BBC Newsbeat, 30 January 2013; accessed 6 October 2014.
  30. Kazi, Safeeyah (12 February 2018). "Jeremy Kyle and Vicky Burton: TV host admits he's 'very happy' after confirming engagement to children's former nanny". Evening Standard. Archived from the original on 13 May 2019. Retrieved 13 May 2019.
  31. "Jeremy Kyle received treatment for anxiety after TV show was axed". The Guardian. 4 September 2021. Retrieved 5 September 2021.