List of Major League Baseball career games finished leaders

Last updated

Mariano Rivera, the all-time leader in games finished. 0G1G4040 Mariano Rivera.jpg
Mariano Rivera, the all-time leader in games finished.

In baseball statistics, a relief pitcher is credited with a game finished (denoted by GF) if he is the last pitcher to pitch for his team in a game. A starting pitcher is not credited with a GF for pitching a complete game.

Contents

Mariano Rivera [1] [2] [3] is the all-time leader in games finished with 952. Rivera is the only pitcher in MLB history to finish more than 900 career games. Trevor Hoffman [4] and Lee Smith [5] are the only other pitchers to finish more than 800 games in their careers.

Key

RankRank amongst leaders in career games finished. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2021 GF)Number of games finished during the 2021 Major League Baseball season
GFTotal career games finished
*Denotes elected to National Baseball Hall of Fame.
BoldDenotes active player. [note 1]

List

Craig Kimbrel, the active leader in games finished and tied for 37th all-time. Craig Kimbrel on May 31, 2016.jpg
Craig Kimbrel, the active leader in games finished and tied for 37th all-time.
RankPlayer (2021 GF)GF
1 Mariano Rivera *952
2 Trevor Hoffman *856
3 Lee Smith *802
4 John Franco 774
5 Rollie Fingers *709
6 Billy Wagner 703
7 Jeff Reardon 695
8 Goose Gossage *681
9 Francisco Rodríguez 677
10 Roberto Hernández 667
11 Hoyt Wilhelm *651
12 Doug Jones 640
13 Kent Tekulve 638
14 Sparky Lyle 634
15 José Mesa 633
16 Todd Jones 619
17 Gene Garber 609
18 Fernando Rodney 590
19 Joe Nathan 587
20 Jonathan Papelbon 585
21 Dennis Eckersley *577
Lindy McDaniel 577
23 Francisco Cordero 575
24 Roy Face 574
25 Rick Aguilera 557
26 Dan Quisenberry 553
27 Mike Marshall 549
Jeff Montgomery 549
Robb Nen 549
30 Tom Henke 548
Randy Myers 548
32 Troy Percival 546
33 Tug McGraw 541
34 Armando Benítez 527
35 Huston Street 525
36 John Wetteland 523
37 Craig Kimbrel (43)520
José Valverde 520
39 Rod Beck 519
Kenley Jansen (52)519
41 Bruce Sutter *512
42 Bob Wickman 511
43 Don McMahon 505
44 Jesse Orosco 501
45 Jason Isringhausen 499
46 Dave Righetti 474
47 Mike Timlin 467
48 Aroldis Chapman (46)465
49 Ron Perranoski 458
50 Todd Worrell 456
RankPlayer (2021 GF)GF
51 Bill Campbell 455
52 Gregg Olson 447
53 Steve Bedrosian 439
54 Mike Henneman 432
Dave Smith 432
56 Roger McDowell 430
57 Joakim Soria (20)427
58 Mike Jackson 422
Dan Plesac 422
60 Willie Hernández 419
Mitch Williams 419
62 Darold Knowles 417
63 Ted Abernathy 416
64 Greg Minton 415
65 Ugueth Urbina 408
66 Keith Foulke 406
Mark Melancon (53)406
Stu Miller 406
69 Eddie Guardado 401
70 Gary Lavelle 399
71 Jeff Shaw 384
72 Kevin Gregg 382
73 Brian Fuentes 381
Dave LaRoche 381
75 Dave Giusti 380
76 Jeff Brantley 379
77 Bob Stanley 377
78 Clay Carroll 373
LaTroy Hawkins 373
80 Tom Burgmeier 370
81 Brad Lidge 368
82 John Hiller 363
Mike Stanton 363
84 Danny Graves 360
Jay Howell 360
86 J. J. Putz 357
87 Bobby Thigpen 356
88 Greg Holland (23)353
89 Jim Brewer 351
90 Tom Gordon 347
91 Eddie Fisher 344
92 Rafael Soriano 343
93 Frank Linzy 342
94 Ron Davis 340
Jeff Russell 340
96 Ron Kline 338
97 Mark Clear 337
98 Elías Sosa 330
99 Billy Koch 325
100 Jim Johnson 324

Notes

  1. A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

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Save (baseball) Credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under certain prescribed circumstances

In baseball, a save is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under certain prescribed circumstances. Most commonly a pitcher earns a save by entering in the ninth inning of a game in which his team is winning by three or fewer runs and finishing the game by pitching one inning without losing the lead. The number of saves or percentage of save opportunities successfully converted are oft-cited statistics of relief pitchers, particularly those in the closer role. The save statistic was created by journalist Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an official MLB statistic in 1969. The save has been retroactively measured for pitchers before that date. Mariano Rivera is MLB's all-time leader in regular-season saves with 652, while Francisco Rodríguez earned the most saves in a single season with 62 in 2008.

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References

  1. "Mariano Rivera Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 28, 2021.
  2. Cohen, Alan. "Mariano Rivera Bio". Society For American Baseball Research. Retrieved July 28, 2021.
  3. "Mariano Rivera Hall of Fame Profile". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  4. "Trevor Hoffman Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 28, 2021.
  5. "Lee Smith Career Stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved July 28, 2021.