300 save club

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Mariano Rivera has the most career saves in Major League Baseball history with 652. Mariano Rivera allison 7 29 07.jpg
Mariano Rivera has the most career saves in Major League Baseball history with 652.

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 300 save club is the group of pitchers who have recorded 300 or more regular-season saves in their careers. [1] [2] [3] [4] Most commonly a relief pitcher ("reliever" or "closer") earns a save by being the final pitcher of a game in which his team is winning by three or fewer runs and pitching at least one inning without losing the lead. The final pitcher of a game can earn a save by getting at least one batter out to end the game with the winning run on base, at bat, or on deck, or by pitching the last three innings without relinquishing the lead, regardless of score. [5] The statistic was created by Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an official statistic by MLB in 1969. [6] [7] The save has been retroactively measured for past pitchers where applicable. Hoyt Wilhelm retired in 1972 and recorded just 31 saves from 1969 onwards, for example, but holds 228 total career saves. [8]

Contents

Mariano Rivera holds the MLB save record with 652. Only Rivera and Trevor Hoffman have exceeded 500 or 600 saves, and Hoffman was the first to achieve either. Rivera, Hoffman, Lee Smith, Francisco Rodríguez, John Franco, and Billy Wagner are the only pitchers to have recorded 400 or more saves. Rollie Fingers was the first player to record 300 saves, reaching the mark on August 21, 1982. Aroldis Chapman is the most recent, achieving his 300th on August 26, 2021. In total, 31 players have recorded 300 or more saves in their career. Only eight relievers – Dennis Eckersley, Fingers, Goose Gossage, Hoffman, Rivera, Smith, Bruce Sutter, and Wilhelm – have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; [9] all but Wilhelm also have at least 300 saves. [10] Craig Kimbrel, Kenley Jansen, and Chapman are the only active players with more than 300 saves, and Kimbrel is the active leader with 371. [11]

Key

PlayerName of the player
SVTotal career saves
DateDate of the pitcher's 300th save
TeamThe pitcher's team for his 300th save
Dagger-14-plain.pngElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Double-dagger-14-plain.pngPlayer is active [note 1]

List

Trevor Hoffman was the first player to reach the 500 and 600 save milestones. Trevor Hoffman 01.jpg
Trevor Hoffman was the first player to reach the 500 and 600 save milestones.
PlayerSVDateTeamYears activeRef(s)
Mariano Rivera Dagger-14-plain.png652May 28, 2004 New York Yankees 1995–2013 [12] [13]
Trevor Hoffman Dagger-14-plain.png601August 15, 2001 San Diego Padres 1993–2010 [14]
Lee Smith Dagger-14-plain.png478August 25, 1991 St. Louis Cardinals 1980–1997 [15] [16]
Francisco Rodríguez 437June 22, 2013 Milwaukee Brewers 2002–2017 [17] [18]
John Franco 424April 29, 1996 New York Mets 1984–2005 [19]
Billy Wagner 422July 4, 2006 New York Mets 1995–2010 [20]
Dennis Eckersley Dagger-14-plain.png390May 24, 1995 Oakland Athletics 1975–1998 [21]
Joe Nathan 377April 8, 2013 Texas Rangers 1999–2000, 2002–2009, 2011–2016 [22] [23]
Craig Kimbrel Double-dagger-14-plain.png372May 5, 2018 Boston Red Sox 2010–present [24]
Jonathan Papelbon 368June 10, 2014 Philadelphia Phillies 2005–2016 [25]
Jeff Reardon 367May 20, 1991 Boston Red Sox 1979–1994 [26] [27]
Troy Percival 358July 28, 2004 Anaheim Angels 1995–2005, 2007–2009 [28] [29]
Kenley Jansen Double-dagger-14-plain.png350September 25, 2019 Los Angeles Dodgers 2010–present [30]
Randy Myers 347July 1, 1997 Baltimore Orioles 1985–1998 [31] [32]
Rollie Fingers Dagger-14-plain.png341August 21, 1982 Milwaukee Brewers 1968–1985 [33]
John Wetteland 330May 12, 2000 Texas Rangers 1989–2000 [34]
Francisco Cordero 329June 1, 2011 Cincinnati Reds 1999–2012 [2] [35]
Fernando Rodney 327September 22, 2017 Arizona Diamondbacks 2002–2003, 2005–2019 [36]
Roberto Hernández 326May 25, 2002 Kansas City Royals 1991–2007 [37] [38]
Huston Street 324July 22, 2015 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 2005–2017 [39]
José Mesa 321April 27, 2005 Pittsburgh Pirates 1987, 1990–2007 [40] [41]
Todd Jones 319September 16, 2007 Detroit Tigers 1993–2008 [42] [43]
Rick Aguilera 318June 2, 2000 Chicago Cubs 1985–2000 [44] [45]
Robb Nen 314August 6, 2002 San Francisco Giants 1993–2002 [3] [46]
Tom Henke 311August 18, 1995 St. Louis Cardinals 1982–1995 [47]
Goose Gossage Dagger-14-plain.png310August 6, 1988 Chicago Cubs 1972–1989, 1991–1994 [48]
Aroldis Chapman Double-dagger-14-plain.png306August 26, 2021 New York Yankees 2010–present [49]
Jeff Montgomery 304August 25, 1999 Kansas City Royals 1987–1999 [50]
Doug Jones 303September 11, 1999 Oakland Athletics 1982–2000 [51]
Jason Isringhausen 300August 15, 2011 New York Mets 1995–2012 [52]
Bruce Sutter Dagger-14-plain.png300September 9, 1988 Atlanta Braves 1976–1986, 1988 [53]
A ticket from the game where Goose Gossage became the second player in MLB history to earn 300 career saves on August 6, 1988. Philadelphia Phillies at Chicago Cubs 1988-08-06 (ticket).JPG
A ticket from the game where Goose Gossage became the second player in MLB history to earn 300 career saves on August 6, 1988.

See also

Notes

  1. A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.

Related Research Articles

Save (baseball) Credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under certain prescribed circumstances

In baseball, a save is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under certain prescribed circumstances. Most commonly a pitcher earns a save by entering in the ninth inning of a game in which his team is winning by three or fewer runs and finishing the game by pitching one inning without losing the lead. The number of saves or percentage of save opportunities successfully converted are oft-cited statistics of relief pitchers, particularly those in the closer role. The save statistic was created by journalist Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an official MLB statistic in 1969. The save has been retroactively measured for pitchers before that date. Mariano Rivera is MLB's all-time leader in regular-season saves with 652, while Francisco Rodríguez earned the most saves in a single season with 62 in 2008.

Mariano Rivera Panamanian-American baseball player

Mariano Rivera is a Panamanian-American former professional baseball pitcher who played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, from 1995 to 2013. Nicknamed "Mo" and "Sandman", he spent most of his career as a relief pitcher and served as the Yankees' closer for 17 seasons. A thirteen-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion, he is MLB's career leader in saves (652) and games finished (952). Rivera won five American League (AL) Rolaids Relief Man Awards and three Delivery Man of the Year Awards, and he finished in the top three in voting for the AL Cy Young Award four times. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame as part of its class of 2019 in his first year of eligibility, and was the first player ever to be elected unanimously by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA).

Relief pitcher A pitcher who enters the game

In baseball and softball, a relief pitcher or reliever is a pitcher who enters the game after the starting pitcher is removed due to injury, ineffectiveness, fatigue, ejection, or for other strategic reasons, such as inclement weather delays or pinch hitter substitutions. Relief pitchers are further divided informally into various roles, such as closers, setup men, middle relief pitchers, left/right-handed specialists, and long relievers. Whereas starting pitchers usually rest several days before pitching in a game again due to the number of pitches thrown, relief pitchers are expected to be more flexible and typically pitch more games but with fewer innings pitched. A team's staff of relievers is normally referred to metonymically as a team's bullpen, which refers to the area where the relievers sit during games, and where they warm-up prior to entering the game.

Bruce Sutter American baseball player

Howard Bruce Sutter is an American former professional baseball pitcher who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1976 and 1988. He was one of the sport's dominant relievers in the late 1970s and early 1980s, making effective use of the split-finger fastball. A six-time All-Star and 1982 World Series champion, Sutter recorded a 2.83 career earned run average and 300 saves, the third-most in MLB history at the time of his retirement. Sutter won the National League's (NL) Cy Young Award in 1979 as its top pitcher, and won the NL Rolaids Relief Man Award four times. He became the only pitcher to lead the NL in saves five times.

Goose Gossage American baseball player

Richard Michael "Goose" Gossage is a former Major League Baseball right-handed relief pitcher. During a 22-year baseball career (1972–1994), he pitched for nine different teams, spending his best years with the New York Yankees and San Diego Padres.

Lee Smith (baseball) American baseball player

Lee Arthur Smith is an American former professional baseball pitcher who played 18 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for eight teams. Serving mostly as a relief pitcher during his career, he was a dominant closer and held the major league record for career saves from 1993 until 2006, when Trevor Hoffman passed his total of 478. Smith was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2019 by the Today's Game Era Committee.

Trevor Hoffman American baseball player

Trevor William Hoffman is an American former professional baseball relief pitcher who played 18 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1993 to 2010. A long-time closer, he pitched for the Florida Marlins, San Diego Padres, and Milwaukee Brewers, including more than 15 years for the Padres. Hoffman was the major leagues' first player to reach the 500- and 600-save milestones, and was the all-time saves leader from 2006 until 2011. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018. Hoffman currently serves as senior advisor for baseball operations for the Padres.

Joe Nathan American baseball player

Joseph Michael Nathan is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He played 16 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Francisco Giants, Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers, Detroit Tigers, and Chicago Cubs. Nathan started out his baseball career as a shortstop in high school and in college for Stony Brook, but converted to a pitcher after being drafted by the Giants. He worked his way through the minor leagues, alternating between spots in the rotation and the bullpen.

Jonathan Papelbon American baseball pitcher

Jonathan Robert Papelbon is an American former professional baseball relief pitcher. He played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), most notably for the Boston Red Sox, with whom he was an All-Star in four consecutive seasons (2006–2009), won the 2007 Delivery Man of the Year Award, and was a 2007 World Series champion. The Red Sox drafted him in the 4th round of the 2003 Major League Baseball Draft, and he played three seasons of minor league baseball before breaking into the majors. He also played for the Philadelphia Phillies from 2012 to 2015, and the Washington Nationals from 2015 to 2016.

Major League Baseball Reliever of the Year Award Annual award in Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball (MLB) annually honors its best relief pitchers in the American League (AL) and National League (NL) with the Mariano Rivera AL Reliever of the Year Award and Trevor Hoffman NL Reliever of the Year Award, respectively. The awards are named after Mariano Rivera and Trevor Hoffman, who played their entire careers in the respective leagues. First issued in 2014, the awards replaced the Delivery Man of the Year Award, which had been presented since 2005.

Closer (baseball) Baseball relief pitcher specialized in finishing games

In baseball, a closing pitcher, more frequently referred to as a closer, is a relief pitcher who specializes in getting the final outs in a close game when his team is leading. The role is often assigned to a team's best reliever. Before the 1990s, pitchers in similar roles were referred to as a fireman, short reliever, and stopper. A small number of closers have won the Cy Young Award. Eight closers have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Goose Gossage, Trevor Hoffman, Mariano Rivera, Lee Smith, Bruce Sutter and Hoyt Wilhelm.

David Robertson (baseball) American baseball player

David Alan Robertson, nicknamed D-Rob, is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Tampa Bay Rays of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played in MLB for the New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox and Philadelphia Phillies.

Craig Kimbrel American baseball pitcher

Craig Michael Kimbrel is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Chicago White Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the San Diego Padres, Boston Red Sox, Atlanta Braves, and Chicago Cubs. He is an eight-time All-Star, two-time Reliever of the Year, and a 2018 World Series champion. He is known for his triple-digit fastball, as well as his unique pre-pitch stare. Listed at 6 feet 0 inches (1.83 m) and 210 pounds (95 kg), he both throws and bats right-handed.

Core Four Group of New York Yankees players from the 1990s through the 2010s

The "Core Four" are former New York Yankees baseball players Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte, Jorge Posada, and Mariano Rivera. Each member of the Core Four was a key contributor to the Yankees' late-1990s and early 2000s dynasty that won four World Series championships in five years.

Major League Baseball (MLB) annually honored its best relief pitcher with the Major League Baseball Delivery Man of the Year Award from 2005 through 2013. It was initially part of a sponsorship agreement between MLB and package delivery company DHL Express; DHL's sponsorship ran from 2005 to 2010. There was also a Delivery Man of the Month Award. From its inception in 2005 through 2008, the award was given to a single reliever who was selected online by fans from a group of 10 finalists chosen by an MLB panel. The panel took sole responsibility to select the annual winner starting in 2009.

Rolaids Relief Man Award

The Rolaids Relief Man Award was an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award given from 1976 to 2012 to the top relief pitchers of the regular season, one in the American League (AL) and one in the National League (NL). Relief pitchers enter the game after the starting pitcher is removed. The award was sponsored by the antacid brand Rolaids, whose slogan was "R-O-L-A-I-D-S spells relief." Because the first closers were nicknamed "firemen", a reference to "putting out the fire" of another team's rally, the trophy was a gold-plated firefighter's helmet. Unlike other awards, such as the Cy Young Award or the MLB Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award, the Relief Man was based on statistical performance, rather than votes. Each save was worth three points; each win was worth two points; and each loss was worth negative two points. Beginning with the 1988 MLB season, negative two points were given for blown saves. In the 2000 MLB season, the term "tough save", which was worth an additional point, was introduced by Rolaids. A "tough save" happened when a relief pitcher entered the game already having the potential tying run on base, and got the save. The player with the highest point total won the award.

Major League Baseball (MLB) honors its best relief pitchers with a Reliever of the Month Award for one pitcher in the American League (AL) and one in the National League (NL) during each month of the regular season. These awards have been issued since 2017. From 2005 to 2013, MLB honored a single relief pitcher across both leagues with the Delivery Man of the Month Award during each month of the regular season.

Major League Baseball (MLB) honored its best relief pitchers with a Delivery Man of the Month Award for one pitcher during each month of the regular season from 2005 through 2013. The awards were initially part of a sponsorship agreement between MLB and package delivery company DHL Express; DHL's sponsorship ran from 2005 to 2010. There was also a Delivery Man of the Year Award; all of the Delivery Man awards were discontinued after 2013. A new Reliever of the Month Award was first awarded in 2017.

References

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