Dennis Eckersley

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References

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  2. Jim Ison. Mormons in the Major Leagues. p.37
  3. "This Series has loads of hometown heroes". Star-News . October 16, 1989. Retrieved November 9, 2014.
  4. "Eckersley: No-hitter". St. Petersburg Times . May 31, 1977. Retrieved May 3, 2014.
  5. 1 2 "Dennis Eckersley Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved May 3, 2014.
  6. 1 2 Gammons, Peter (December 12, 1988). "One Eck of a Guy". Sports Illustrated . Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  7. Kekis, John (July 26, 2004). "Eckersley gives stirring speech as he and Molitor enter Hall". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette . Archived from the original on September 23, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2016.
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  15. "Career Leaders & Records for Games Played". Baseball-Reference.com.
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  18. Falkner, David (October 12, 1989). "On Field or Off, Eckersley Battles". The New York Times . Retrieved October 4, 2016.
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  20. "The All-Century Team". MLB.com . Retrieved September 20, 2013.
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  23. Leatherman, Gary (September 5, 2006). "Dennis Eckersley Field dedication set for Friday at WHS". Tri-City Voice. Retrieved September 20, 2013.
  24. "Dennis Eckersley returns to A's in a Special way". 31 March 2017.
  25. "Webster's New World Ecktionary". 2 June 2009. Retrieved 26 July 2020.
  26. Eckersley to fill in for Remy Archived 2009-05-07 at the Wayback Machine NESN.com, May 4, 2009
  27. "Dennis Eckersley". 15 August 2016.
  28. "Brian Anderson will call the NLCS on TBS due to Ernie Johnson's NBA commitments". 2 October 2017.
  29. The Curse of Rocky Colavito: A Loving Look at a Thirty-Year Slump, Terry Pluto, p.167–169, Gray & Company, ISBN   978-1-59851-035-5
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  31. "Alumni Profiles: Jennifer Eckersley '93". Heidelberg University. Archived from the original on September 19, 2016. Retrieved August 17, 2016.
  32. Finn, Chad (2019-07-16). "I got lucky, man.' Dennis Eckersley on surviving his tough times". The Boston Globe . Retrieved 2019-07-16.
  33. Finn, Chad (November 29, 2018). "MLB Network to premiere Dennis Eckersley documentary" . The Boston Globe . Retrieved November 29, 2018.

Further reading


Dennis Eckersley
Dennis Eckersley 2008 (crop).jpg
Eckersley at the 2008 All-Star Game Red Carpet Parade
Pitcher
Born: (1954-10-03) October 3, 1954 (age 67)
Oakland, California
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 12, 1975, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
September 26, 1998, for the Boston Red Sox
Preceded by
No-hitter pitcher
May 30, 1977
Succeeded by