1986 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1986 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 7 – October 27, 1986
Number of games162
Number of teams26
TV partner(s) ABC, NBC
Draft
Top draft pick Jeff King
Picked by Pittsburgh Pirates
Regular Season
Season MVP AL: Roger Clemens (BOS)
NL: Mike Schmidt (PHI)
League postseason
AL champions Boston Red Sox
  AL runners-up California Angels
NL champions New York Mets
  NL runners-up Houston Astros
World Series
Champions New York Mets
  Runners-up Boston Red Sox
World Series MVP Ray Knight (NYM)
MLB seasons

The 1986 Major League Baseball season saw the New York Mets win their second World Series title, their first since 1969.

Contents

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Wade Boggs BOS.357 Tim Raines MTL.334
HR Jesse Barfield TOR40 Mike Schmidt PHI37
RBI Joe Carter CLE121 Mike Schmidt PHI119
Wins Roger Clemens BOS24 Fernando Valenzuela LA21
ERA Roger Clemens BOS2.48 Mike Scott HOU2.22
SO Mark Langston SEA245 Mike Scott HOU306
SV Dave Righetti NYY46 Todd Worrell STL36
SB Rickey Henderson NYY87 Vince Coleman STL107

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

 League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
         
East Boston 4 
West California 3 
  ALBoston3
 NLNY Mets4
East NY Mets 4
West Houston 2 

Managers

American League

TeamManagerNotes
Baltimore Orioles Earl Weaver
Boston Red Sox John McNamara Won American League Pennant
California Angels Gene Mauch
Chicago White Sox Tony La Russa, Doug Rader, Jim Fregosi
Cleveland Indians Pat Corrales
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals Dick Howser, Mike Ferraro
Milwaukee Brewers George Bamberger, Tom Trebelhorn
Minnesota Twins Ray Miller, Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Lou Piniella
Oakland Athletics Jackie Moore, Jeff Newman, Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Chuck Cottier, Marty Martínez, Dick Williams
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine
Toronto Blue Jays Jimy Williams

National League

TeamManagerNotes
Atlanta Braves Chuck Tanner
Chicago Cubs Jim Frey, John Vukovich, Gene Michael
Cincinnati Reds Pete Rose
Houston Astros Hal Lanier
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Buck Rodgers
New York Mets Davey Johnson Won World Series
Philadelphia Phillies John Felske
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Whitey Herzog
San Diego Padres Steve Boros
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer GameEst. Payroll
Los Angeles Dodgers [1] 73-23.2%3,023,208-7.4%37,324$15,213,77638.7%
New York Mets [2] 10810.2%2,767,6010.2%34,168$15,393,71442.1%
California Angels [3] 922.2%2,655,8723.4%32,389$14,427,2580.0%
St. Louis Cardinals [4] 79-21.8%2,471,974-6.3%30,518$9,875,010-16.4%
Toronto Blue Jays [5] 86-13.1%2,455,477-0.5%30,315$12,801,04737.2%
Kansas City Royals [6] 76-16.5%2,320,7947.3%28,652$13,043,69823.5%
New York Yankees [7] 90-7.2%2,268,0302.4%28,350$18,494,25329.9%
Boston Red Sox [8] 9517.3%2,147,64120.2%26,514$14,402,23932.2%
Baltimore Orioles [9] 73-12.0%1,973,176-7.5%24,977$13,001,2587.6%
Philadelphia Phillies [10] 8614.7%1,933,3355.6%24,167$11,590,1668.9%
Detroit Tigers [11] 873.6%1,899,437-16.9%23,450$12,335,71419.2%
Chicago Cubs [12] 70-9.1%1,859,102-14.0%23,239$17,208,16535.5%
San Diego Padres [13] 74-10.8%1,805,716-18.3%22,293$11,380,6931.7%
Houston Astros [14] 9615.7%1,734,27646.4%21,411$9,873,276-1.2%
Cincinnati Reds [15] 86-3.4%1,692,432-7.8%20,894$11,906,38842.4%
Texas Rangers [16] 8740.3%1,692,00252.1%20,889$6,743,119-12.2%
San Francisco Giants [17] 8333.9%1,528,74886.7%18,873$8,947,0008.8%
Cleveland Indians [18] 8440.0%1,471,805124.6%18,170$7,809,50019.2%
Chicago White Sox [19] 72-15.3%1,424,313-14.7%17,584$10,418,8195.8%
Atlanta Braves [20] 729.1%1,387,1812.7%17,126$17,102,78615.5%
Oakland Athletics [21] 76-1.3%1,314,646-1.5%15,839$9,779,4218.0%
Milwaukee Brewers [22] 778.5%1,265,041-7.0%15,813$9,943,642-11.9%
Minnesota Twins [23] 71-7.8%1,255,453-24.0%15,499$9,498,16764.8%
Montreal Expos [24] 78-7.1%1,128,981-24.9%14,112$11,103,60017.2%
Seattle Mariners [25] 67-9.5%1,029,045-8.8%12,549$5,958,30929.2%
Pittsburgh Pirates [26] 6412.3%1,000,91736.0%12,357$10,938,50018.0%

Television coverage

NetworkDay of weekAnnouncers
ABC Monday nights
Sunday afternoons
Al Michaels, Jim Palmer, Tim McCarver, Keith Jackson, Don Drysdale
NBC Saturday afternoons Vin Scully, Joe Garagiola, Bob Costas, Tony Kubek

Events

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 2005 Major League Baseball season was notable for the league's new steroid policy in the wake of the BALCO scandal, which enforced harsher penalties than ever before for steroid use in Major League Baseball. Several players, including veteran Rafael Palmeiro, were suspended under the new policy. Besides steroids it was also notable that every team in the NL East division finished the season with at least 81 wins. Additionally it was the first season featuring a baseball team in Washington, D.C. after more than 3 decades, with the Washington Nationals having moved from Montreal.

The 1985 Major League Baseball season ended with the Kansas City Royals defeating the St. Louis Cardinals in the seventh game of the I-70 World Series. Bret Saberhagen, the regular season Cy Young Award winner, was named MVP of the Series. The National League won the All-Star Game for the second straight year.

The 1997 Major League Baseball season was the inaugural season for Interleague play, as well as the final season in the American League for the Milwaukee Brewers before moving to the NL the following season. The California Angels changed their name to the Anaheim Angels. The Florida Marlins ended the season as the World Champions defeating the Cleveland Indians in a seven-game World Series, four games to three.

The 1998 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the San Diego Padres in the World Series, after they had won a then AL record 114 regular season games. The Yankees finished with 125 wins for the season, which remains the MLB record.

The 1999 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the Atlanta Braves in the World Series.

The 1996 Major League Baseball season was the final season of league-only play before the beginning of interleague play the following season. The season ended with the New York Yankees defeating the defending champion Atlanta Braves in six games for the World Series title, the Yankees' first championship since 1978. The record for most home runs hit in an MLB regular season, set at 4,458 in 1987, was broken, as the AL and NL combined to hit 4,962 home runs. Only 196 shutouts were recorded in the 2,266 MLB regular-season games. This was the first season in the Divisional Series era to be played to the full 162 games, as the 1994–95 player's strike caused the first two seasons of the era to be abbreviated.

The 1988 Major League Baseball season ended with the underdog Los Angeles Dodgers shocking the Oakland Athletics, who had won 104 games during the regular season, in the World Series. The most memorable moment of the series came in Game 1, when injured Dodger Kirk Gibson hit a dramatic pinch-hit walk-off home run off Athletics closer Dennis Eckersley to win the game for Los Angeles. The Dodgers went on to win the Series in five games.

The 1992 Major League Baseball season saw the Toronto Blue Jays defeat the Atlanta Braves in the World Series, becoming the first team outside the United States to win the World Series.

The 1990 Major League Baseball season saw the Cincinnati Reds upset the heavily favored Oakland Athletics in the World Series, for their first title since 1976.

The 1989 Major League Baseball season saw the Oakland Athletics win their first World Series title since 1974.

The 1987 Major League Baseball season ended with the American League Champion Minnesota Twins winning the World Series over the National League Champion St. Louis Cardinals, four games to three, as all seven games were won by the home team.

The 1984 Major League Baseball season started with a 9-game winning streak by the eventual World Series champions Detroit Tigers who started the season with 35 wins and 5 losses and never relinquished the first place lead.

The 1982 Major League Baseball season. Making up for their playoff miss of the year before, the St. Louis Cardinals won their ninth World Series championship, defeating the Milwaukee Brewers, four games to three.

The 1980 Major League Baseball season saw the Philadelphia Phillies win their first World Series Championship.

The 1979 Major League Baseball season. None of the post-season teams of 1977 or 1978 returned to this year's postseason. In a re-match of the 1971 World Series, the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Baltimore Orioles in seven games in the 1979 World Series.

The 1977 Major League Baseball season. The American League (AL) had its third expansion as the Seattle Mariners and Toronto Blue Jays began play. However, the National League (NL) did not expand, remaining at 12 teams compared to the AL's 14, until the Colorado Rockies and Florida Marlins joined the NL in 1993.

The 1975 Major League Baseball season saw Frank Robinson become the first black manager in the Major Leagues. He managed the Cleveland Indians.

The 1967 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 10 to October 12, 1967. The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Boston Red Sox four games to three in the World Series, which was the first World Series appearance for the Red Sox in 21 years. Following the season, the Kansas City Athletics relocated to Oakland.

The 1942 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 14 to October 5, 1942. The St. Louis Cardinals and New York Yankees were the regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. The Cardinals then defeated the Yankees in the World Series, four games to one.

The 1944 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 18 to October 9, 1944. The St. Louis Cardinals and St. Louis Browns were the regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. In an all-St. Louis postseason, the Cardinals then defeated the Browns in the World Series, four games to two.

References

  1. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. Crossman, Matt. "Parallel Pain". sportsonearth.com. Archived from the original on December 13, 2014. Retrieved December 13, 2014.
  28. Cafardo, Nick (April 30, 1986). "Kall him Dr. Klemens". Nashua Telegraph. (New Hampshire). Patriot Ledger Sports Service. p. 17.
  29. Golden, Ed (April 30, 1986). "Clemens fans 20 Mariners". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. p. D1.
  30. "Boston's Clemens makes history". The Bulletin. (Bend, Oregon). UPI. April 30, 1986. p. D2.
  31. Gammons, Peter (May 12, 1986). "Striking out toward Cooperstown". Sports Illustrated. p. 26.
  32. http://espn.go.com/classic/s/add_Clemens_Roger.html
  33. Jaffe, Chris. "Wednesday, June 06, 2012 50th anniversary: LaRussa goes pro". HardballTimes.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.