1951 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1951 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 16 – October 12, 1951
Number of games154
Number of teams16
Regular season
Season MVP AL: Yogi Berra (NYY)
NL: Roy Campanella (BKN)
AL champions New York Yankees
  AL runners-up Cleveland Indians
NL champions New York Giants
  NL runners-up Brooklyn Dodgers
World Series
Champions New York Yankees
  Runners-up New York Giants
Finals MVP Phil Rizzuto (NYY)
MLB seasons

The 1951 Major League Baseball season opened on April 16 and finished on October 12, 1951. Teams from both leagues played a 154-game regular season schedule. At the end of the regular season, the National League pennant was still undecided resulting in a three game playoff between the New York Giants and the Brooklyn Dodgers. After splitting the first two games, the stage was set for a decisive third game, won in dramatic fashion on a walk-off homerun from the bat of Giant Bobby Thomson, one of the most famous moments in the history of baseball, commemorated as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World" and "The Miracle at Coogan's Bluff". The Giants lost the World Series to defending champion New York Yankees, who were in the midst of a 5-year World Series winning streak.

Contents

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

  American League National League
TypeNameStatNameStat
AVG Ferris Fain PHA.344 Stan Musial SLC.355
HR Gus Zernial CHW/PHA33 Ralph Kiner PIT42
RBI Gus Zernial CHW/PHA129 Monte Irvin NYG121
Wins Bob Feller CLE22 Larry Jansen NYG
Sal Maglie NYG
23
ERA Saul Rogovin CHW2.78 Chet Nichols BSB2.88
SO Vic Raschi NYY164 Don Newcombe BRO
Warren Spahn BSB
164
SV Ellis Kinder BSR14 Ted Wilks SLC/PIT13
SB Minnie Miñoso CLE/CHW31 Sam Jethroe BSB35

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
    
 AL NY Yankees 4
 NL NY Giants 2

Managers

American League

TeamManagerComments
Boston Red Sox Steve O'Neill
Chicago White Sox Paul Richards
Cleveland Indians Al López
Detroit Tigers Red Rolfe
New York Yankees Casey Stengel
Philadelphia Athletics Connie Mack
St. Louis Browns Zack Taylor
Washington Senators Bucky Harris

National League

TeamManagerComments
Boston Braves Billy Southworth and Tommy Holmes
Brooklyn Dodgers Chuck Dressen
Chicago Cubs Frankie Frisch and Phil Cavarretta
Cincinnati Reds Luke Sewell
New York Giants Leo Durocher
Philadelphia Phillies Eddie Sawyer
Pittsburgh Pirates Billy Meyer
St. Louis Cardinals Marty Marion

Home Field Attendance

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer Game
New York Yankees [1] 980.0%1,950,107-6.3%25,001
Cleveland Indians [2] 931.1%1,704,984-1.3%22,143
Chicago White Sox [3] 8135.0%1,328,23470.0%17,029
Boston Red Sox [4] 87-7.4%1,312,282-2.4%17,497
Brooklyn Dodgers [5] 979.0%1,282,6288.2%16,444
Detroit Tigers [6] 73-23.2%1,132,641-42.0%14,710
New York Giants [7] 9814.0%1,059,5395.0%13,584
St. Louis Cardinals [8] 813.8%1,013,429-7.3%12,828
Pittsburgh Pirates [9] 6412.3%980,590-15.9%12,572
Philadelphia Phillies [10] 73-19.8%937,658-23.0%12,177
Chicago Cubs [11] 62-3.1%894,415-23.3%11,616
Washington Senators [12] 62-7.5%695,167-0.6%9,147
Cincinnati Reds [13] 683.0%588,2689.2%7,640
Boston Braves [14] 76-8.4%487,475-48.4%6,250
Philadelphia Athletics [15] 7034.6%465,46950.2%5,892
St. Louis Browns [16] 52-10.3%293,79018.9%3,815

Events

See also

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References

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  13. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
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