1982 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1982 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 5 – October 20, 1982
Number of games162
Number of teams26
Draft
Top draft pick Shawon Dunston
Picked by Chicago Cubs
Regular season
Season MVP AL: Robin Yount (MIL)
NL: Dale Murphy (ATL)
League postseason
AL champions Milwaukee Brewers
  AL runners-up California Angels
NL champions St. Louis Cardinals
  NL runners-up Atlanta Braves
World Series
Champions St. Louis Cardinals
  Runners-up Milwaukee Brewers
World Series MVP Darrell Porter (STL)
MLB seasons

The 1982 Major League Baseball season. Making up for their playoff miss of the year before, the St. Louis Cardinals won their ninth World Series championship, defeating the Milwaukee Brewers, four games to three.

Contents

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Willie Wilson KC.332 Al Oliver MTL.331
HR Reggie Jackson CAL
Gorman Thomas MIL
39 Dave Kingman NYM37
RBI Hal McRae KC133 Dale Murphy ATL
Al Oliver MTL
109
Wins LaMarr Hoyt CHW19 Steve Carlton PHI23
ERA Rick Sutcliffe CLE2.96 Steve Rogers MTL2.40
SO Floyd Bannister SEA209 Steve Carlton PHI286
SV Dan Quisenberry KC35 Bruce Sutter STL36
SB Rickey Henderson OAK130 Tim Raines MTL78

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

 League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
         
East Milwaukee 3 
West California 2 
  ALMilwaukee3
 NLSt. Louis4
East St. Louis 3
West Atlanta 0 

Home Field Attendance

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer Game
Los Angeles Dodgers [1] 8839.7%3,608,88151.6%44,554
California Angels [2] 9382.4%2,807,36094.7%34,659
Philadelphia Phillies [3] 8950.8%2,376,39445.0%29,338
Montreal Expos [4] 8643.3%2,318,29251.1%28,621
Kansas City Royals [5] 9080.0%2,284,46478.6%28,203
St. Louis Cardinals [6] 9255.9%2,111,906109.0%26,073
New York Yankees [7] 7933.9%2,041,21926.4%25,200
Milwaukee Brewers [8] 9553.2%1,978,896126.3%24,133
Boston Red Sox [9] 8950.8%1,950,12483.9%24,076
Atlanta Braves [10] 8978.0%1,801,985236.6%22,247
Oakland Athletics [11] 686.3%1,735,48933.1%21,426
Detroit Tigers [12] 8338.3%1,636,05842.4%20,198
Baltimore Orioles [13] 9459.3%1,613,03157.5%19,671
San Diego Padres [14] 8197.6%1,607,516209.6%19,846
Chicago White Sox [15] 8761.1%1,567,78765.6%19,597
Houston Astros [16] 7726.2%1,558,55518.0%19,241
Cincinnati Reds [17] 61-7.6%1,326,52821.3%16,377
New York Mets [18] 6558.5%1,323,03687.9%16,334
Toronto Blue Jays [19] 78110.8%1,275,97869.0%15,753
Chicago Cubs [20] 7392.1%1,249,278120.9%15,423
San Francisco Giants [21] 8755.4%1,200,94889.9%14,827
Texas Rangers [22] 6412.3%1,154,43235.8%14,252
Seattle Mariners [23] 7672.7%1,070,40468.2%13,215
Cleveland Indians [24] 7850.0%1,044,02157.9%12,889
Pittsburgh Pirates [25] 8482.6%1,024,10689.0%12,643
Minnesota Twins [26] 6046.3%921,18696.4%11,373

Television coverage

NetworkDay of weekAnnouncers
ABC Monday nights
Sunday afternoons
Keith Jackson, Howard Cosell, Don Drysdale, Al Michaels, Bob Uecker, Jim Palmer, Tommy Lasorda
NBC Saturday afternoons Joe Garagiola, Tony Kubek, Dick Enberg, Bob Costas, Sal Bando
USA Thursday nights Eddie Doucette, Nelson Briles, Monte Moore, Wes Parker

Events

Notes

a Major League Baseball seasons since 1901 without a no-hitter pitched are 1909, 1913, 1921, 1927 1928, 1932 1933, 1936, 1939, 1942 1943, 1949, 1959, 1982, 1985, 1989, 2000 and 2005.

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References

  1. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. No-Hitters in chronological Order by Retro Sheet