1987 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1987 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 6 – October 25, 1987
Number of games162
Number of teams26
Draft
Top draft pick Ken Griffey Jr.
Picked by Seattle Mariners
Regular season
Season MVP NL: Andre Dawson (CHC)
AL: George Bell (TOR)
League postseason
AL champions Minnesota Twins
  AL runners-up Detroit Tigers
NL champions St. Louis Cardinals
  NL runners-up San Francisco Giants
World Series
Champions Minnesota Twins
  Runners-up St. Louis Cardinals
World Series MVP Frank Viola (MIN)
MLB seasons

The 1987 Major League Baseball season ended with the American League Champion Minnesota Twins winning the World Series over the National League Champion St. Louis Cardinals, four games to three, as all seven games were won by the home team.

Contents

In June, future Hall of Fame outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. was selected with the number one overall pick in the Major League Baseball draft, by the Seattle Mariners.

Awards and honors

Gold Glove Award
Position American League National League
1B Don Mattingly, New York Yankees Keith Hernandez, New York Mets
2B Frank White, Kansas City Royals Ryne Sandberg, Chicago Cubs
3B Gary Gaetti, Minnesota Twins Terry Pendleton, St. Louis Cardinals
SS Tony Fernández, Toronto Blue Jays Ozzie Smith, St. Louis Cardinals
OF Kirby Puckett, Minnesota Twins Eric Davis, Cincinnati Reds
OF Gary Pettis, California Angels Andre Dawson, Chicago Cubs
OF Jesse Barfield, Toronto Blue Jays Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres
C Bob Boone, California Angels Mike LaValliere, Pittsburgh Pirates
P Mark Langston, Seattle Mariners Rick Reuschel, Pittsburgh Pirates

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox .363 Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres .370
HR Mark McGwire, Oakland Athletics 49 Andre Dawson, Chicago Cubs 49
RBI George Bell, Toronto Blue Jays 134 Andre Dawson, Chicago Cubs 137
Wins Roger Clemens, Boston Red Sox
Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics
20 Rick Sutcliffe, Chicago Cubs 18
ERA Jimmy Key, Toronto Blue Jays 2.76 Nolan Ryan, Houston Astros 2.76
SO Mark Langston, Seattle Mariners 262 Nolan Ryan, Houston Astros 270
SV Tom Henke, Toronto Blue Jays 34 Steve Bedrosian, Philadelphia Phillies 40
SB Harold Reynolds, Seattle Mariners 60 Vince Coleman, St. Louis Cardinals 109

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

 League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
         
East Detroit 1 
West Minnesota 4 
  ALMinnesota4
 NLSt. Louis3
East St. Louis 4
West San Francisco 3 

Managers

American League

TeamManagerNotes
Baltimore Orioles Cal Ripken, Sr.
Boston Red Sox John McNamara
California Angels Gene Mauch
Chicago White Sox Jim Fregosi
Cleveland Indians Pat Corrales, Doc Edwards
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals Billy Gardner, John Wathan
Milwaukee Brewers Tom Trebelhorn
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly Won World Series
New York Yankees Lou Piniella
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Dick Williams
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine
Toronto Blue Jays Jimy Williams

National League

TeamManagerNotes
Atlanta Braves Chuck Tanner
Chicago Cubs Gene Michael, Frank Lucchesi
Cincinnati Reds Pete Rose
Houston Astros Hal Lanier
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Buck Rodgers
New York Mets Davey Johnson
Philadelphia Phillies John Felske, Lee Elia
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Whitey Herzog Won National League Pennant
San Diego Padres Larry Bowa
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer GameEst. Payroll
St. Louis Cardinals [1] 9520.3%3,072,12224.3%37,927$11,758,00019.1%
New York Mets [2] 92-14.8%3,034,1299.6%37,458$13,846,714-10.0%
Los Angeles Dodgers [3] 730.0%2,797,409-7.5%34,536$14,474,737-4.9%
Toronto Blue Jays [4] 9611.6%2,778,42913.2%34,302$10,765,401-15.9%
California Angels [5] 75-18.5%2,696,2991.5%33,288$13,855,999-4.0%
New York Yankees [6] 89-1.1%2,427,6727.0%29,971$19,457,7145.2%
Kansas City Royals [7] 839.2%2,392,4713.1%29,537$12,513,056-4.1%
Boston Red Sox [8] 78-17.9%2,231,5513.9%27,894$13,770,171-4.4%
Cincinnati Reds [9] 84-2.3%2,185,20529.1%26,978$9,281,500-22.0%
Philadelphia Phillies [10] 80-7.0%2,100,1108.6%25,927$12,482,9977.7%
Minnesota Twins [11] 8519.7%2,081,97665.8%25,703$10,585,00011.4%
Detroit Tigers [12] 9812.6%2,061,8308.5%25,455$12,122,881-1.7%
Chicago Cubs [13] 768.6%2,035,1309.5%25,439$15,473,026-10.1%
San Francisco Giants [14] 908.4%1,917,16825.4%23,669$8,532,500-4.6%
Houston Astros [15] 76-20.8%1,909,90210.1%23,579$12,758,37129.2%
Milwaukee Brewers [16] 9118.2%1,909,24450.9%23,571$7,293,224-26.7%
Montreal Expos [17] 9116.7%1,850,32463.9%22,844$8,762,052-21.1%
Baltimore Orioles [18] 67-8.2%1,835,692-7.0%22,386$14,250,2739.6%
Texas Rangers [19] 75-13.8%1,763,0534.2%21,766$5,992,718-11.1%
Oakland Athletics [20] 816.6%1,678,92127.7%20,727$12,730,83930.2%
San Diego Padres [21] 65-12.2%1,454,061-19.5%17,951$12,065,7966.0%
Atlanta Braves [22] 69-4.2%1,217,402-12.2%15,030$17,444,5602.0%
Chicago White Sox [23] 776.9%1,208,060-15.2%14,914$12,135,34316.5%
Pittsburgh Pirates [24] 8025.0%1,161,19316.0%14,336$8,789,500-19.6%
Seattle Mariners [25] 7816.4%1,134,25510.2%14,003$4,623,000-22.4%
Cleveland Indians [26] 61-27.4%1,077,898-26.8%13,307$9,033,75015.7%

Television coverage

NetworkDay of weekAnnouncers
ABC Monday nights
Sunday afternoons
Al Michaels, Jim Palmer, Tim McCarver, Gary Bender
NBC Saturday afternoons Vin Scully, Joe Garagiola, Bob Costas, Tony Kubek

Events

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References

  1. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. Mackin, Bob (2004). The Unofficial Guide to Baseball's Most Unusual Records. Canada: Greystone Books. p. 240. ISBN   9781553650386.