1991 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1991 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 8 – October 27, 1991
Number of games162
Number of teams26
TV partner(s) CBS, ESPN
Draft
Top draft pick Brien Taylor
Picked by New York Yankees
Regular Season
Season MVP AL: Cal Ripken, Jr. (BAL)
NL: Terry Pendleton (ATL)
League postseason
AL champions Minnesota Twins
  AL runners-up Toronto Blue Jays
NL champions Atlanta Braves
  NL runners-up Pittsburgh Pirates
World Series
Champions Minnesota Twins
  Runners-up Atlanta Braves
World Series MVP Jack Morris (MIN)
MLB seasons

The 1991 Major League Baseball season saw the Minnesota Twins defeat the Atlanta Braves for the World Series title, in a series where every game was won by the home team.

Contents

Awards and honors

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA AwardNational LeagueAmerican League
Rookie of the Year Jeff Bagwell (HOU) Chuck Knoblauch (MIN)
Cy Young Award Tom Glavine (ATL) Roger Clemens (BOS)
Manager of the Year Bobby Cox (ATL) Tom Kelly (MIN)
Most Valuable Player Terry Pendleton (ATL) Cal Ripken Jr. (BAL)
Gold Glove Awards
PositionNational LeagueAmerican League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (CHC) Mark Langston (CAL)
Catcher Tom Pagnozzi (STL) Tony Peña (BOS)
First Baseman Will Clark (SF) Don Mattingly (NYY)
Second Baseman Ryne Sandberg (CHC) Roberto Alomar (TOR)
Third Baseman Matt Williams (SF) Robin Ventura (CHW)
Shortstop Ozzie Smith (STL) Cal Ripken Jr. (BAL)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (PIT) Kirby Puckett (MIN)
Tony Gwynn (SD) Devon White (TOR)
Andy Van Slyke (PIT) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Tom Glavine (ATL) Frank Thomas (CHW)
Catcher Benito Santiago (SD) Mickey Tettleton (DET)
First Baseman Will Clark (SF) Cecil Fielder (DET)
Second Baseman Ryne Sandberg (CHC) Julio Franco (TEX)
Third Baseman Howard Johnson (NYM) Wade Boggs (BOS)
Shortstop Barry Larkin (CIN) Cal Ripken Jr. (BAL)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (PIT) Joe Carter (TOR)
Bobby Bonilla (PIT) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Ron Gant (ATL) Jose Canseco (OAK)

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Julio Franco TEX.341 Terry Pendleton ATL.319
HR José Canseco OAK
Cecil Fielder DET
44 Howard Johnson NYM38
RBI Cecil Fielder DET133 Howard Johnson NYM117
Wins Scott Erickson MIN
Bill Gullickson DET
20 Tom Glavine ATL
John Smiley PIT
20
ERA Roger Clemens BOS2.62 Dennis Martínez MTL2.39
SO Roger Clemens BOS241 David Cone NYM241
SV Bryan Harvey CAL46 Lee Smith STL47
SB Rickey Henderson OAK58 Marquis Grissom MTL76

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

 League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
         
East Toronto 1 
West Minnesota 4 
  ALMinnesota4
 NLAtlanta3
East Pittsburgh 3
West Atlanta 4 

Managers

American League

TeamManagerComments
Baltimore Orioles Frank Robinson Replaced during the season by Johnny Oates
Boston Red Sox Joe Morgan
California Angels Doug Rader Replaced during the season by Buck Rodgers
Chicago White Sox Jeff Torborg
Cleveland Indians John McNamara Replaced during the season by Mike Hargrove
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals John Wathan Replaced during the season by Hal McRae
Milwaukee Brewers Tom Trebelhorn
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly Won the World Series
New York Yankees Stump Merrill
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Jim Lefebvre
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston Replaced temporarily by Gene Tenace while undergoing treatment for a herniated disc

National League

TeamManagerComments
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox Won National League pennant
Chicago Cubs Don Zimmer Replaced during the season by Jim Essian
Cincinnati Reds Lou Piniella
Houston Astros Art Howe
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Buck Rodgers Replaced during the season by Tom Runnels
New York Mets Bud Harrelson Replaced during the season by Mike Cubbage
Philadelphia Phillies Nick Leyva Replaced during the season by Jim Fregosi
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Joe Torre
San Diego Padres Greg Riddoch
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer GameEst. Payroll
Toronto Blue Jays [1] 915.8%4,001,5273.0%49,402$19,902,4173.3%
Los Angeles Dodgers [2] 938.1%3,348,17011.5%41,335$32,790,66448.9%
Chicago White Sox [3] 87-7.4%2,934,15446.5%36,224$16,919,66757.8%
Oakland Athletics [4] 84-18.4%2,713,493-6.4%33,500$36,999,16784.2%
Boston Red Sox [5] 84-4.5%2,562,4351.3%31,635$35,167,50068.6%
Baltimore Orioles [6] 67-11.8%2,552,7535.7%31,515$17,519,00073.5%
St. Louis Cardinals [7] 8420.0%2,448,699-4.8%29,151$21,860,0013.9%
California Angels [8] 811.3%2,416,236-5.5%29,830$33,060,00147.5%
Cincinnati Reds [9] 74-18.7%2,372,377-1.2%29,289$26,305,33381.8%
Chicago Cubs [10] 770.0%2,314,2503.1%27,883$23,380,66760.2%
Texas Rangers [11] 852.4%2,297,72011.7%28,367$18,224,50016.8%
Minnesota Twins [12] 9528.4%2,293,84231.0%28,319$23,361,83353.0%
New York Mets [13] 77-15.4%2,284,484-16.4%27,860$32,590,00148.7%
Kansas City Royals [14] 829.3%2,161,537-3.7%26,686$26,319,8348.9%
Seattle Mariners [15] 837.8%2,147,90542.3%26,517$15,691,83321.9%
Atlanta Braves [16] 9444.6%2,140,217118.4%26,422$18,403,50022.2%
Pittsburgh Pirates [17] 983.2%2,065,3020.8%24,587$23,634,66751.9%
Philadelphia Phillies [18] 781.3%2,050,0122.9%24,699$22,487,33263.7%
New York Yankees [19] 716.0%1,863,733-7.1%23,009$27,344,16828.3%
San Diego Padres [20] 8412.0%1,804,289-2.8%22,275$22,150,00124.5%
San Francisco Giants [21] 75-11.8%1,737,478-12.0%21,450$30,967,66643.6%
Detroit Tigers [22] 846.3%1,641,6619.8%20,267$23,838,33329.6%
Milwaukee Brewers [23] 8312.2%1,478,729-15.6%18,484$23,115,50014.7%
Houston Astros [24] 65-13.3%1,196,152-8.8%14,767$12,852,500-31.5%
Cleveland Indians [25] 57-26.0%1,051,863-14.2%12,828$17,635,00016.0%
Montreal Expos [26] 71-16.5%934,742-31.9%13,746$10,732,333-38.1%

Television coverage

NetworkDay of weekAnnouncers
CBS Saturday afternoons Jack Buck, Tim McCarver, Dick Stockton, Jim Kaat
ESPN Sunday nights
Tuesday nights
Wednesday nights
Friday nights
Jon Miller, Joe Morgan

Events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Movies

Deaths

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References

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