1953 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1953 throughout the world.

Baseball Sport

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1953rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 953rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 53rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1950s decade.

Contents

List of years in baseball

Champions

Major League Baseball

1953 World Series 1953 Major League Baseball championship series

The 1953 World Series matched the 4-time defending champions New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers in a rematch of the 1952 Series, and the 4th such matchup between the two teams in the past seven seasons. The Yankees won in 6 games for their 5th consecutive title—a mark which has not been equalled—and their 16th overall. Billy Martin recorded his 12th hit of the Series scoring Hank Bauer in Game 6.

New York Yankees Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in the Bronx, New York, United States

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City; the other club is the National League (NL)'s New York Mets. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles. Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise that had ceased operations and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.

1953 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1953 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 20th playing of the mid-summer classic between the All-Stars teams of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14 at Crosley Field in Cincinnati, home of the Cincinnati Redlegs of the National League. The team changed its name from Reds to Redlegs this season, during the height of anti-communism in the United States; it returned to the Reds six years later.

Other champions

All-American Girls Professional Baseball League league for womens baseball teams in the United States

The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL) was a professional women's baseball league founded by Philip K. Wrigley which existed from 1943 to 1954. The AAGPBL is the forerunner of women's professional league sports in the United States. Over 600 women played in the league, which consisted of eventually 10 teams located in the American Midwest. In 1948, league attendance peaked at over 900,000 spectators. The most successful team, the Rockford Peaches, won a league-best four championships. The 1992 motion picture A League of Their Own is a mostly fictionalized account of the early days of the league and its stars.

The Grand Rapids Chicks were a women's professional baseball team based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. They played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League from 1945 to 1954, winning championships in 1947 and 1953.

The 1953 College World Series was the seventh NCAA-sanctioned baseball tournament that determined a national champion. The tournament was held as the conclusion of the 1953 NCAA baseball season and was played at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, NE from June 11 to June 16. The tournament's champion was Michigan, coached by Ray Fisher. The Most Outstanding Player was J. L. Smith of Texas.

Winter Leagues

The fifth edition of the Caribbean Series was played in 1953. It was held from February 20 through February 25, featuring the champion baseball teams of Cuba, Leones de la Habana; Panama, Chesterfield Smokers; Puerto Rico, Cangrejeros de Santurce, and Venezuela, Leones del Caracas. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice. The games were played at Estadio del Cerro in Havana, the Cuban capital.

Cangrejeros de Santurce (baseball) Baseball team based in Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico

Cangrejeros de Santurce is a professional baseball team based in Santurce, the largest barrio of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The franchise joined the Liga de Béisbol Profesional Roberto Clemente when it was the semi-professional Liga de Béisbol Semi-Profesional de Puerto Rico. Having played for over 70 years, the Cangrejeros have won twelve national titles and five Caribbean Series. With over 2000 victories, the Cangrejeros have won the most games in the history of Puerto Rican professional baseball. The 1954–55 Cangrejeros, nicknamed Panic Squad, was the team's most notable roster, with a lineup that included hall of famers Roberto Clemente and Willie Mays. This version of the Cangrejeros won the National and Caribbean championships by sweeping their respective series.

The Cuban League was one of the earliest and longest lasting professional baseball leagues outside the United States, operating in Cuba from 1878 to 1961. The schedule usually operated during the winter months, so the league was sometimes known as the "Cuban Winter League." It was always a small league, generally 3 to 5 teams, and was centered in Havana, though it sometimes included teams from outlying cities such as Matanzas or Santa Clara. The league became racially integrated in 1900, and during the first half of the 20th century the Cuban League was a premier venue for black and white players to meet. Many great black Northern American players competed in Cuba alongside native black and white Cuban stars such as José Méndez, Cristóbal Torriente, Adolfo Luque, and Martín Dihigo. After 1947, the Cuban League entered into an agreement with Major League Baseball and was used for player development. Following the 1959 Cuban Revolution, however, tensions rose with the new Communist government, and in March 1961 the government decreed the abolition of professional baseball.

Awards and honors

Ed Barrow American baseball manager and executive

Edward Grant Barrow was an American manager and front office executive in Major League Baseball. He served as the field manager of the Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox. He served as business manager of the New York Yankees from 1921 to 1939 and as team president from 1939 to 1945, and is credited with building the Yankee dynasty. Barrow was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1953.

Chief Bender American baseball player and coach

Charles Albert "Chief" Bender was a pitcher in Major League Baseball during the 1910s and 1920s. In 1911, Bender tied a record by pitching three complete games in a single World Series. He finished his career with a win-loss record of 212-127, for a .625 winning percentage and a career 2.46 earned run average (ERA).

Tom Connolly American baseball umpire

Thomas Henry Connolly was an English-American umpire in Major League Baseball. He officiated in the National League from 1898 to 1900, followed by 31 years of service in the American League from 1901 to 1931. In over half a century as an American League umpire and supervisor, he established the high standards for which the circuit's arbiters became known, and solidified the reputation for integrity of umpires in the major leagues.

Statistical leaders

  American League National League
TypeNameStatNameStat
AVG Mickey Vernon WSH.337 Carl Furillo BKN.344
HR Al Rosen CLE43 Eddie Mathews MIL49
RBI Al Rosen CLE145 Roy Campanella BKN143
Wins Bob Porterfield WSH22 Robin Roberts PHP &
Warren Spahn MIL
23
ERA Ed Lopat NYY2.42 Warren Spahn MIL2.10
Ks Billy Pierce CHW186 Robin Roberts PHP198

Major league baseball final standings

Events

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October

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December

Movies

Births

January

February

March

April

May

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July

August

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December

Deaths

January

February

March

April

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June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Sources

  1. Jim Thorpe Is Dead On West Coast at 64. Article published at The New York Times on March 29,1953. Retrieved on February 25, 2018.
  2. Ball, Bat and Bishop: the Origin of Ball Games. Henderson. by Robert W. (2001). University of Illinois Press. ISBN   978-0-25-206992-5.
  3. Milwaukee Braves Heroes and Heartbreak. Povletich, William (2009). Wisconsin Historical Society Press. ISBN   978-0-87-020423-4
  4. August 30, 1953: Milwaukee Braves set National League home run record. Article and box scores published by SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  5. New York Yankees 10, Philadelphia Athletics 0 (2). Game Played on Wednesday, June 28, 1939 (D) at Shibe Park. Retrosheet box score. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  6. Doc Moskiman. Article written by Bill Nowlin. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 18, 2019.
  7. Ben Taylor. Negro Leagues Baseball Museum. Retrieved on June 18, 2019.
  8. Ben Taylor. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved on June 18, 2019.
  9. Clyde Milan. Article written by Tom Simon. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  10. 1 2 Pitchers Stealing Home. Article written by Leonard Gettelson.SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  11. A thorough account of pitchers who have started both games of a doubleheader in the major leagues. Article written by J.G. Preston. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  12. May 2, 1917: Fred Toney and Reds prevail 1–0 in double no-hitter against Cubs' Hippo Vaughn. Article written by Mike Lynch. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  13. Fred Toney statistics and history. Retrosheet. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  14. 1 2 3 4 Jim Thorpe Biography. Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  15. Jim Thorpe (1887–1953). IMDb. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  16. 1 2 3 Kid Nichols Statistics and History. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  17. 1892 Championship Series Boston Beaneaters over Cleveland Spiders (5–0–1). Baseball Reference. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  18. 1 2 Kid Nichols Biography. Baseball Hall of Fame Official Website. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  19. Kid Nichols Obituary. The New York Times, Sunday, April 12th, 1953. Retrieved from The Deadball Era on February 24, 2018.
  20. Roy Patterson. Article written by Terry Bohn. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 21, 2019.
  21. Cot's Baseball Contracts. Baseball Prospectus. Retrieved on June 24, 2019.
  22. A thorough account of pitchers who have started both games of a doubleheader in the major leagues. Article by J.G. Preston. PrestonJG website. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  23. Sam Leever. Article written by Mark Armour. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  24. Ray Grimes. Article written by Bill Nowlin. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  25. 1 2 3 Jesse Burkette batting and fielding statistics. Retrosheet. Retrieved on June 20, 2019.
  26. 1 2 3 Jesse Burkett. Article written by David Jones. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on February 25, 2018.
  27. 1 2 Year by Year Leaders for Batting Average / Batting Champions. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on February 25, 2018.
  28. Arnold Rothstein and Baseball's 1919 Black Sox Scandal. Article written by David Pietrusza. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  29. Jim Tabor. Article written by Maurice Bouchard. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  30. Jack Pfiester. Article written by Stuart Schimler. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 26, 2019.
  31. Buck Herzog. Article written by Gabriel Schechter. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 26, 2019.
  32. Tom Dougherty. Batting and pitching statistics. Baseball Reference Retrieved on June 13, 2019.
  33. Billy Maharg. Article written by Bill Lamb. SABR BiographyProject. Retrieved on June 26, 2019.
  34. Ed Barrow. Article written by Daniel R. Levitt. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 27, 2019.
  35. Pinch Thomas. Article written by Joanne Hulbert. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 27, 2019.
  36. Patsy Donovan. Article written by David Jones. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 27, 2019.