1953 Philadelphia Athletics season

Last updated

1953 Philadelphia Athletics
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Earle Mack & Roy Mack
General manager(s) Arthur Ehlers
Manager(s) Jimmy Dykes
Local television WPTZ/WCAU/WFIL
Local radio WIBG
(By Saam, Claude Haring)
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The 1953 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 59 wins and 95 losses, 41½ games behind the New York Yankees, who would win their fifth consecutive World Series Championship. It was also the penultimate season for the franchise in Philadelphia.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

The 1953 New York Yankees season was the 51st season for the team in New York, and its 53rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 99–52, winning their 20th pennant, finishing 8.5 games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 6 games. This was the Yankees fifth consecutive World Series win, a record that still stands.

1953 World Series 1953 Major League Baseball championship series

The 1953 World Series matched the 4-time defending champions New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers in a rematch of the 1952 Series, and the 4th such matchup between the two teams in the past seven seasons. The Yankees won in 6 games for their 5th consecutive title—a mark which has not been equalled—and their 16th overall. Billy Martin recorded his 12th hit of the Series scoring Hank Bauer in Game 6.

Contents

Offseason

Ferris Fain American baseball player

Ferris Roy Fain was an American baseball first baseman in Major League Baseball who played nine seasons with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers and Cleveland Indians in the American League.

Chicago White Sox Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Chicago, Illinois, United States

The Chicago White Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division. The White Sox are owned by Jerry Reinsdorf, and play their home games at Guaranteed Rate Field, located on the city's South Side. They are one of two major league clubs in Chicago; the other is the Chicago Cubs, who are a member of the National League (NL) Central division.

Joe DeMaestri American baseball player

Joseph Paul DeMaestri, nicknamed "Froggy", was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago White Sox (1951), St. Louis Browns (1952), Philadelphia / Kansas City Athletics (1953–59) and New York Yankees (1960–61). He batted and threw right-handed, stood 6 feet (1.83 m) tall and weighed 170 pounds (77 kg).

Regular season

During the season, Bob Trice became the first black player in the history of the Athletics. [3]

Robert Lee Trice was an American baseball pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1953–1954) and Kansas City Athletics (1955). A native of Newton, Georgia, the right-hander stood 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) and weighed 190 lbs.

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB
New York Yankees 99 52 .656 --
Cleveland Indians 92 62 .604 8.5
Chicago White Sox 89 65 .578 11.5
Boston Red Sox 84 69 .549 16
Washington Senators 76 76 .500 23.5
Detroit Tigers 60 94 .325 40.5
Philadelphia Athletics 59 95 .383 41.5
St. Louis Browns 54 100 .351 46.5

Record vs. opponents

1953 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSCWSCLEDETNYYPHISTLWSH
Boston 6–16 13–9 13–9 10–11 15–7 17–5 10–12
Chicago 16–6 11–11–1 14–8–1 9–13 10–12 17–5 12–10
Cleveland 9–13 11–11–1 14–8 11–11 19–3 17–5 11–11
Detroit 9–13 8–14–1 8–14 6–16 11–11–3 7–15 11–11
New York 11–10 13–9 11–11 16–6 17–5 17–5 14–6
Philadelphia 7–15 12–10 3–19 11–11–3 5–17 13–9 8–14
St. Louis 5–17 5–17 5–17 15–7 5–17 9–13 10–12
Washington 12–10 10–12 11–11 11–11 6–14 14–8 12–10

Roster

1953 Philadelphia Athletics
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

OutfieldersManager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
1B Robinson, Eddie Eddie Robinson 156 615 152 .247 22 102
SS DeMaestri, Joe Joe DeMaestri 111 420 107 .255 6 35
OF McGhee, Ed Ed McGhee 104 358 94 .263 1 29

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Hamilton, Tom Tom Hamilton 58 56 11 .196 0 5

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Byrd, Harry Harry Byrd 40 236.2 11 20 5.51 122
Trice, Bob Bob Trice 3 23 2 1 5.48 4

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Fricano, Marion Marion Fricano 39 211 9 12 3.88 67
Bishop, Charlie Charlie Bishop 39 160.2 3 14 5.66 66
Coleman, Joe Joe Coleman 21 90 3 4 4.00 18

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Fanovich, Frank Frank Fanovich 26 0 3 0 5.55 37

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Ottawa Athletics International League Frank Skaff
A Williamsport Athletics Eastern League George Staller
A Savannah Indians Sally League Les Bell
B Fayetteville Athletics Carolina League Buck Etchison, Bill Bergeron,
Bob Eiziminger and Kemp Wicker
C St. Hyacinthe A's Provincial League John Sosh and Joe Rullo
D Welch Miners Appalachian League Jack Crosswhite
D Cordele A's Georgia–Florida League Joe Rullo and Lew Richardson
D Hopkinsville Hoppers KITTY League Norm Wilson and Ed Wright

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Savannah, Welch

Related Research Articles

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1902 Philadelphia Athletics season

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The 1908 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

The 1926 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 58 wins and 93 losses.

The 1905 Cleveland Naps season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League with a record of 76–78, 19 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

The 1913 Cleveland Naps season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 9½ games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

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The 1886 Philadelphia Athletics finished with a 63–72 record and finished in sixth place in the American Association.

References

  1. Joe DeMaestri at Baseball Reference
  2. Sam Zoldak at Baseball Reference
  3. Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p. 199, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN   978-0-451-22363-0