1929 Philadelphia Athletics season

Last updated

1929 Philadelphia Athletics
1929 AL Champions
1929 World Series Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Connie Mack, Tom Shibe and John Shibe
Manager(s) Connie Mack
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The 1929 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 1st in the American League with a record of 104 wins and 46 losses. After finishing in second place to the New York Yankees in 1927 and 1928, the club won the 1929 pennant by a large 18-game margin. The club went on to win the World Series over the NL champion Chicago Cubs, four games to one.

Contents

Offseason

Regular season

Led by longtime owner-manager Connie Mack, the Athletics dominated during the regular season. Mack had purchased quite a few players from the Baltimore Orioles minor league club, and many of them would contribute to the A's 1929–31 dynasty.[ citation needed ]

The most famous of these players was ace Lefty Grove. In 1929, Grove led the American League in ERA and strikeouts on his way to a 20–6 record. Big George Earnshaw was the number two pitcher on the squad. He led the league in wins (24) and was second in strikeouts. Led by these two, Philadelphia allowed the fewest runs of any AL team.

On the offensive side, the A's boasted Hall of Famers Mickey Cochrane, Jimmie Foxx, and Al Simmons. Simmons beat out Babe Ruth for the RBI crown in 1929.

Season standings

American League WLPct.GB
Philadelphia Athletics 10446.693--
New York Yankees 8866.57118
Cleveland Indians 8171.53324
St. Louis Browns 7973.52026
Washington Senators 7181.46734
Detroit Tigers 7084.45536
Chicago White Sox 5993.38846
Boston Red Sox 5896.37748

Record vs. opponents

1929 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSCWSCLEDETNYYPHISTLWSH
Boston 11–119–138–145–174–1811–11–110–12
Chicago 11–119–1210–126–169–134–1710–12
Cleveland 13–912–911–1114–87–1410–1214–8
Detroit 14–812–1011–119–134–1810–1210–12–1
New York 17–516–68–1413–98–1414–812–10
Philadelphia 18–413–914–718–414–811–10–116–4
St. Louis 11–11–117–412–1012–108–1410–11–19–13
Washington 12–1012–108–1412–10–110–124–1613–9

Roster

1929 Philadelphia Athletics
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
C Mickey Cochrane 135514170.331795
1B Jimmie Foxx 149517183.35433118
2B Max Bishop 129475110.232336
3B Sammy Hale 101379105.277140
SS Joe Boley 9130376.251247
LF Al Simmons 143581212.36534157
CF Mule Haas 139578181.3131682
RF Bing Miller 147556184.331893

Other batters

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
INF Jimmy Dykes 119401131.3271379
OF Homer Summa 378122.272010
C Cy Perkins 387616.21109
INF Joe Cronin 255613.23204
OF Ossie Orwoll 305113.25506
IB George Burns 294913.265111
OF Walter French 454512.26719
2B Bud Morse 8272.07400
OF Bevo LeBourveau 12165.31302
SS Eric McNair 484.50003
PH Eddie Collins 970.00000
C Cloy Mattox 361.16700
OF Doc Cramer 260.00000
3B Rudy Miller 241.25001
SS Joe Hassler 440.00000

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; GS = Games started; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGGSIPWLERASO
Lefty Grove 4237275.12062.81170
Rube Walberg 4033267.218113.6094
George Earnshaw 4433254.22483.29149
Jack Quinn 3518161.01193.9741

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Bill Shores 39152.21163.6049
Eddie Rommel 32113.21222.8525
Howard Ehmke 1154.2723.2920
Bill Breckinridge 310008.102

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGWLSVERASO
Carroll Yerkes 191014.5811
Ossie Orwoll 120214.8012

1929 World Series

AL Philadelphia Athletics (4) vs. NL Chicago Cubs (1)

GameScoreDateLocationAttendance
1Athletics – 3, Cubs – 1October 8 Wrigley Field 50,740
2Athletics – 9, Cubs – 3October 9 Wrigley Field 49,987
3Cubs – 3, Athletics – 1October 11 Shibe Park 29,921
4Cubs – 8, Athletics – 10October 12 Shibe Park 29,921
5Cubs – 2, Athletics – 3October 14 Shibe Park 29,921

Farm system

LevelTeamLeagueManager
AA Baltimore Orioles International League Fritz Maisel
D Martinsburg Blue Sox Blue Ridge League Dan O'Leary

[2]

Awards and honors

League leaders

More recent honors

Al Simmons and the 1929–1931 Athletics were the subject of an August 19, 1996, cover-story in Sports Illustrated with the teaser, "The Team that Time Forgot". Author William Nack wrote, "according to most old-timers who played in that era, the 1927 and '28 Yankees and the 1929 and '30 Athletics matched up so closely that they were nearly equal, with the A's given the nod in fielding and pitching and the Yankees in hitting." [4]

On August 16, 2009, the Oakland Athletics celebrated the 80th anniversary of the 1929 team by wearing 1929 home uniforms against the Chicago White Sox. First pitches were thrown out by Kathleen Kelly, the granddaughter of Connie Mack, and Jim Conlin, the grandson of Jimmie Foxx. [5] The A's won the game on a walk-off home run by Mark Ellis. [6]

Related Research Articles

The 1929 New York Yankees season was the team's 27th season in New York and its 29th overall. The team finished with a record of 88–66, finishing in second place, 18 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. This ended a streak of three straight World Series appearances for the club. New York was managed by Miller Huggins until his death on September 25. They played at Yankee Stadium.

The 1955 Kansas City Athletics season was the 55th season for the franchise in MLB's American League, and the first in Kansas City after playing the previous 54 in Philadelphia. The team won 63 games – only the fifth time in 20 years that they won more than 60 games – and lost 91, finishing sixth in the American League, 33 games behind the AL Champion New York Yankees.

The 1952 Philadelphia Athletics season saw the A's finish fourth in the American League with a record of 79 wins and 75 losses. They finished 16 games behind the eventual World Series Champion New York Yankees. The Athletics' 1952 campaign would be their final winning season in Philadelphia; it would also be their only winning season of the 1950s. The Athletics would have to wait until 1968, their first season in Oakland, for their next winning record.

The 1944 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 72 wins and 82 losses.

The 1940 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 54 wins and 100 losses.

The 1937 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 54 wins and 97 losses.

The 1936 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 53 wins and 100 losses.

The 1933 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 3rd in the American League with a record of 79 wins and 72 losses. Jimmie Foxx became the first player to win two American League MVP Awards.

The 1932 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing second in the American League with a record of 94 wins and 60 losses. The team finished 13 games behind the New York Yankees, breaking their streak of three straight AL championships.

The 1931 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 107 wins and 45 losses. It was the team's third consecutive pennant-winning season and its third consecutive season with over 100 wins. However the A's lost the 1931 World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games. The series loss prevented the Athletics from becoming the first major league baseball team to win three consecutive World Series; the New York Yankees would accomplish the feat a mere seven years later. The Athletics, ironically, would go on to earn their own threepeat in 1974, some forty-three years after the failed 1931 attempt.

The 1930 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 102 wins and 52 losses. It was their second of three consecutive pennants. In the 1930 World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in six games. This was the A's final World Series championship in Philadelphia. They would next win the World Series 42 years later, in 1972, after they had moved to Oakland. When playing the Cleveland Indians on July 25, the Athletics became the only team in Major League history to execute a triple steal twice in one game.

The 1928 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 2nd in the American League with a record of 98 wins and 55 losses. The team featured seven eventual Hall-of-Fame players: Ty Cobb, Mickey Cochrane, Eddie Collins, Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Grove, Al Simmons, and Tris Speaker.

The 1924 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 71 wins and 81 losses.

The 1919 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing last in the American League with a record of 36 wins and 104 losses. It was their fifth consecutive season in the cellar after owner-manager Connie Mack sold off his star players.

The 1916 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 36 wins and 117 losses. The 1916 team is often considered by baseball historians the worst team in American League history, and its .235 winning percentage is still the lowest ever for a modern (post-1900) big-league team.

The 1914 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. It involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 99 wins and 53 losses. They went on to face the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series, which they lost in four straight games.

The 1901 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 4th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 62 losses. The franchise that would become the modern Athletics originated in 1901 as a new franchise in the American League.

The 1932 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 32nd season in the major leagues, and their 33rd season overall. They finished with a record 49–102, good enough for seventh place in the American League, 56.5 games behind the first place New York Yankees. The 1932 season was their worst ever.

The 1905 New York Giants season was the franchise's 23rd season, and the team won their second consecutive National League pennant. They beat the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.

The 1929 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 81–71, 24 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

References

  1. Homer Summa page at Baseball Reference
  2. Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007
  3. Baseball's Top 100: The Game's Greatest Records, p. 51, Kerry Banks, 2010, Greystone Books, Vancouver, BC, ISBN   978-1-55365-507-7
  4. Nack, William (August 19, 1996). "Lost in History". Sports Illustrated . Retrieved August 17, 2009.
  5. "A's celebrate 80th anniversary of 1929 season with Turn-Back-the-Clock Day". MLB.com . August 11, 2009. Retrieved August 17, 2009.
  6. Loberstein, Adam (August 16, 2009). "Ellis' homer gives A's walk-off victory". MLB.com . Retrieved August 17, 2009.