1988 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1988 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 4 – October 20, 1988
Number of games162
Number of teams26
Draft
Top draft pick Andy Benes
Picked by San Diego Padres
Regular season
Season MVP NL: Kirk Gibson (LA)
AL: José Canseco (OAK)
League postseason
AL champions Oakland Athletics
  AL runners-up Boston Red Sox
NL champions Los Angeles Dodgers
  NL runners-up New York Mets
World Series
Champions Los Angeles Dodgers
  Runners-up Oakland Athletics
World Series MVP Orel Hershiser (LA)
MLB seasons

The 1988 Major League Baseball season ended with the underdog Los Angeles Dodgers shocking the Oakland Athletics, who had won 104 games during the regular season, in the World Series. The most memorable moment of the series came in Game 1, when injured Dodger Kirk Gibson hit a dramatic pinch-hit walk-off home run off Athletics closer Dennis Eckersley to win the game for Los Angeles. The Dodgers went on to win the Series in five games.

Contents

Overview

A ticket from the game where Goose Gossage earned his 300th career save on August 6, 1988. Philadelphia Phillies at Chicago Cubs 1988-08-06 (ticket).JPG
A ticket from the game where Goose Gossage earned his 300th career save on August 6, 1988.

One of the American League's best players in 1988 was Athletics outfielder José Canseco, [ citation needed ] who became the first player in history to hit 40 home runs and steal 40 bases in a single season, unanimously garnering league MVP honors. The A's surrounded him with a stellar supporting cast, led by fellow slugger Mark McGwire (with whom Canseco formed the famed "Bash Brothers" duo). Aided by strong pitching from Dave Stewart and Bob Welch and the lights-out Eckersley securing 45 saves, Oakland ran away with the American League West and swept the Boston Red Sox of Boggs, Rice, and Clemens in the playoffs before falling to the Dodgers in the World Series.

Speaking of the Dodgers, nobody expected them to even contend for the National League West title in 1988, let alone win the World Championship. [ citation needed ] However, the intensity and clutch hitting

of Gibson (named the NL MVP at season's end) and the solid pitching of Orel Hershiser (who won a league-leading 23 games) spearheaded L.A. to a division championship by seven games over the Cincinnati Reds. In addition to his 23 victories, Hershiser led the National League with 267 innings pitched and 8 shutouts, and also set a record of 59 consecutive scoreless innings (formerly held by Dodger great Don Drysdale). These accomplishments, combined with his 2.26 ERA, earned him the National League Cy Young Award. However, it was in the post-season that Hershiser really distinguished himself – he started Games 1 and 3 of the NLCS against the tough New York Mets, saved Game 4 in relief, and threw a complete game shutout in Game 7. He hurled another complete game shutout in Game 2 of the World Series and again went the distance in the clinching Game 5. Hershiser was named MVP of both the NLCS and the World Series, capping off arguably one of the greatest seasons a starting pitcher has ever had.

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Wade Boggs BOS.366 Tony Gwynn SD.313
HR José Canseco OAK42 Darryl Strawberry NYM39
RBI José Canseco OAK124 Will Clark SF109
Wins Frank Viola MIN24 Orel Hershiser LA
Danny Jackson CIN
23
ERA Allan Anderson MIN
Teddy Higuera MIL
2.45 Joe Magrane STL2.18
SO Roger Clemens BOS291 Nolan Ryan HOU228
SV Dennis Eckersley OAK45 John Franco CIN39
SB Rickey Henderson NYY93 Vince Coleman STL81

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

 League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
         
East Boston 0 
West Oakland 4 
  ALOakland1
 NLLos Angeles4
East NY Mets 3
West Los Angeles 4 

Managers

American League

TeamManagerNotes
Baltimore Orioles Cal Ripken, Sr., Frank Robinson
Boston Red Sox John McNamara, Joe Morgan
California Angels Cookie Rojas, Moose Stubing
Chicago White Sox Jim Fregosi
Cleveland Indians Doc Edwards
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals John Wathan
Milwaukee Brewers Tom Trebelhorn
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Billy Martin, Lou Piniella
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa Won American League Pennant
Seattle Mariners Dick Williams, Jim Snyder
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine
Toronto Blue Jays Jimy Williams

National League

TeamManagerNotes
Atlanta Braves Chuck Tanner, Russ Nixon
Chicago Cubs Don Zimmer
Cincinnati Reds Pete Rose, Tommy Helms (acting)
Houston Astros Hal Lanier
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda Won World Series
Montreal Expos Buck Rodgers
New York Mets Davey Johnson
Philadelphia Phillies Lee Elia, John Vukovich
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Whitey Herzog
San Diego Padres Larry Bowa, Jack McKeon
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer GameEst. Payroll
New York Mets [1] 1008.7%3,055,4450.7%38,193$15,401,81411.2%
Minnesota Twins [2] 917.1%3,030,67245.6%37,416$13,308,96625.7%
Los Angeles Dodgers [3] 9428.8%2,980,2626.5%36,793$17,141,01518.4%
St. Louis Cardinals [4] 76-20.0%2,892,799-5.8%35,714$13,192,50012.2%
New York Yankees [5] 85-4.5%2,633,7018.5%32,921$20,371,1524.7%
Toronto Blue Jays [6] 87-9.4%2,595,175-6.6%32,039$14,412,72533.9%
Boston Red Sox [7] 8914.1%2,464,85110.5%30,430$14,687,0926.7%
Kansas City Royals [8] 841.2%2,350,181-1.8%29,377$14,850,06218.7%
California Angels [9] 750.0%2,340,925-13.2%28,900$12,249,888-11.6%
Oakland Athletics [10] 10428.4%2,287,33536.2%28,239$10,653,833-16.3%
Chicago Cubs [11] 771.3%2,089,0342.6%25,476$13,956,698-9.8%
Detroit Tigers [12] 88-10.2%2,081,1620.9%25,693$13,432,07110.8%
Cincinnati Reds [13] 873.6%2,072,528-5.2%25,907$9,697,4094.5%
Philadelphia Phillies [14] 65-18.8%1,990,041-5.2%24,568$13,900,50011.4%
Houston Astros [15] 827.9%1,933,5051.2%23,870$12,641,167-0.9%
Milwaukee Brewers [16] 87-4.4%1,923,2380.7%23,744$9,502,00030.3%
Pittsburgh Pirates [17] 856.3%1,866,71360.8%23,046$7,128,500-18.9%
San Francisco Giants [18] 83-7.8%1,785,297-6.9%22,041$12,822,50050.3%
Baltimore Orioles [19] 54-19.4%1,660,738-9.5%20,759$14,389,0751.0%
Texas Rangers [20] 70-6.7%1,581,901-10.3%19,530$6,385,6316.6%
San Diego Padres [21] 8327.7%1,506,8963.6%18,604$10,723,502-11.1%
Montreal Expos [22] 81-11.0%1,478,659-20.1%18,255$10,046,83314.7%
Cleveland Indians [23] 7827.9%1,411,61031.0%17,427$9,261,5002.5%
Chicago White Sox [24] 71-7.8%1,115,749-7.6%13,775$8,537,500-29.6%
Seattle Mariners [25] 68-12.8%1,022,398-9.9%12,622$7,754,95067.7%
Atlanta Braves [26] 54-21.7%848,089-30.3%10,735$13,065,674-25.1%

Television coverage

NetworkDay of weekAnnouncers
ABC Monday nights Al Michaels, Jim Palmer, Tim McCarver, Gary Bender, Joe Morgan, Reggie Jackson
NBC Saturday afternoons Vin Scully, Joe Garagiola, Bob Costas, Tony Kubek

Events

Movies

Deaths

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References

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