1948 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1948 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 19 – October 11, 1948
Number of games154
Number of teams16
Regular season
Season MVP AL: Lou Boudreau (CLE)
NL: Stan Musial (SLC)
AL champions Cleveland Indians
  AL runners-up Boston Red Sox
NL champions Boston Braves
  NL runners-up St. Louis Cardinals
World Series
Champions Cleveland Indians
  Runners-up Boston Braves
MLB seasons

The 1948 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 19 to October 11, 1948. The Boston Braves and Cleveland Indians were the regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. The Indians won the American League title via a tie-breaker game victory over the Boston Red Sox, after both teams finished their 154-game schedules with identical 96–58 records. The Indians then defeated the Braves in the World Series, four games to two.

Contents

Awards and honors

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
    
 AL Cleveland 4
 NL Bsn Braves 2

League leaders

American League

National League

Managers

American League

TeamManagerComments
Boston Red Sox Joe Cronin
Chicago White Sox Ted Lyons
Cleveland Indians Lou Boudreau
Detroit Tigers Del Baker
New York Yankees Bucky Harris
Philadelphia Athletics Connie Mack
St. Louis Browns Zack Taylor
Washington Senators Joe Kuhel

National League

TeamManagerComments
Boston Braves Billy Southworth
Brooklyn Dodgers Burt Shotton
Chicago Cubs Charlie Grimm
Cincinnati Reds Johnny Neun and Bucky Walters
New York Giants Mel Ott and Leo Durocher
Philadelphia Phillies Ben Chapman and Eddie Sawyer
Pittsburgh Pirates Billy Meyer
St. Louis Cardinals Eddie Dyer

Home Field Attendance

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer Game
Cleveland Indians [1] 9721.3%2,620,62772.2%33,172
New York Yankees [2] 94-3.1%2,373,9018.9%30,830
Detroit Tigers [3] 78-8.2%1,743,03524.7%22,637
Boston Red Sox [4] 9615.7%1,558,7989.2%19,985
Pittsburgh Pirates [5] 8333.9%1,517,02118.2%18,963
New York Giants [6] 78-3.7%1,459,269-8.8%18,952
Boston Braves [7] 915.8%1,455,43913.9%19,151
Brooklyn Dodgers [8] 84-10.6%1,398,967-22.6%17,935
Chicago Cubs [9] 64-7.2%1,237,792-9.3%15,869
St. Louis Cardinals [10] 85-4.5%1,111,440-10.9%14,434
Philadelphia Athletics [11] 847.7%945,0763.7%12,274
Cincinnati Reds [12] 64-12.3%823,386-8.5%10,693
Washington Senators [13] 56-12.5%795,254-6.5%10,196
Chicago White Sox [14] 51-27.1%777,844-11.3%10,235
Philadelphia Phillies [15] 666.5%767,429-15.4%10,098
St. Louis Browns [16] 590.0%335,5644.7%4,415

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.