1998 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1998 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationMarch 31 – October 21, 1998
Number of games162
Number of teams30
TV partner(s) Fox/FSN, ESPN, NBC
Draft
Top draft pick Pat Burrell
Picked by Philadelphia Phillies
Regular Season
Season MVP AL: Juan González (TEX)
NL: Sammy Sosa (CHC)
League Postseason
AL champions New York Yankees
  AL runners-up Cleveland Indians
NL champions San Diego Padres
  NL runners-up Atlanta Braves
World Series
Champions New York Yankees
  Runners-up San Diego Padres
World Series MVP Scott Brosius (NYY)
MLB seasons

The 1998 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the San Diego Padres in the World Series, after they had won a then AL record 114 regular season games. The Yankees finished with 125 wins for the season (regular season and playoffs combined), which remains the MLB record.

Contents

The 1998 season was marked by MLB’s expansion to 30 teams (16 in the NL, 14 in the AL), with two new teams–the Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League, and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in the American League–added. To keep the leagues with even numbers of teams [1] while allowing both leagues to have a new team, the Milwaukee Brewers were moved from the American League Central Division to the National League Central Division. The Detroit Tigers were shifted from the American League East to the American League Central, while the Devil Rays were added to the American League East. The Diamondbacks were added to the National League West, making the NL have more teams than the AL for the first time (this arrangement would last until the end of the 2012 season, when the Houston Astros moved from the National to the American League for 2013, giving each league 15 teams).

The biggest story of the season was the historic chase of the single-season home run record held at the time by Roger Maris. Initially, the St. Louis Cardinals' Mark McGwire and Ken Griffey, Jr. of the Seattle Mariners started the season on a pace to both break Maris' record. In June, the chase was joined by the Chicago Cubs' Sammy Sosa, who broke the decades-old record of Rudy York for most home runs in a calendar month with 20 that month. Eventually, Griffey fell off the record pace, but still ended with 56 homers. Both McGwire and Sosa broke the record in September, with McGwire ultimately finishing with 70 homers to Sosa's 66. McGwire's record would last only three years, with Barry Bonds hitting 73 in 2001. The 1998 season was also the first in MLB history with four players hitting 50 or more homers, with Greg Vaughn of the San Diego Padres hitting 50. In a postscript to the record chase, both McGwire and Sosa have since been widely accused of having used performance-enhancing drugs during that period, and McGwire would admit in 2010 that he had used steroids during the record-setting season. [2]

The defending World Series champions Florida Marlins finished last in the NL East Division at 54-108, making it the first, and only, time that a team went from winning the World Series one year to finishing with 100 or more losses and last in their division the following year.

Standings

Postseason

This was the first season in which teams were seeded by their respective win-loss record within their respective leagues.

Bracket

 Division Series
(ALDS, NLDS)
League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
              
 1 NY Yankees 3 
3 Texas 0 
 1NY Yankees4 
American League
 2Cleveland2 
2 Cleveland 3
 4 Boston 1 
  AL1NY Yankees4
 NL3San Diego0
 1 Atlanta 3 
4 Chicago Cubs 0 
 1Atlanta2
National League
 3San Diego4 
2 Houston 1
 3 San Diego 3 

Awards and honors

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA AwardNational LeagueAmerican League
Rookie of the Year Kerry Wood (CHC) Ben Grieve (OAK)
Cy Young Award Tom Glavine (ATL) Roger Clemens (TOR)
Manager of the Year Larry Dierker (HOU) Joe Torre (NYY)
Most Valuable Player Sammy Sosa (CHC) Juan González (TEX)
Gold Glove Awards
PositionNational LeagueAmerican League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (ATL) Mike Mussina (BAL)
Catcher Charles Johnson (FLA) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman J. T. Snow (SF) Rafael Palmeiro (TEX)
Second Baseman Bret Boone (CIN) Roberto Alomar (CLE)
Third Baseman Scott Rolen (PHI) Robin Ventura (CWS)
Shortstop Rey Ordonez (NYM) Omar Vizquel (CLE)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SFG) Bernie Williams (NYY)
Larry Walker (COL) Jim Edmonds (LAA)
Andruw Jones (ATL) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Tom Glavine (ATL) Jose Canseco (TOR)
Catcher Mike Piazza (NYM) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman Mark McGwire (STL) Rafael Palmeiro (TEX)
Second Baseman Craig Biggio (HOU) Damion Easley (DET)
Third Baseman Vinny Castilla (COL) Dean Palmer (KC)
Shortstop Barry Larkin (CIN) Alex Rodriguez (SEA)
Outfielders Moisés Alou (HOU) Albert Belle (CWS)
Sammy Sosa (CHC) Juan González (TEX)
Greg Vaughn (SD) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)

MLB statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Bernie Williams NYY.339 Larry Walker COL.363
HR Ken Griffey, Jr. SEA56 Mark McGwire STL70
RBI Juan González TEX157 Sammy Sosa CHC158
Wins Roger Clemens 1 TOR
David Cone NYY
Rick Helling TEX
20 Tom Glavine ATL20
ERA Roger Clemens 1 TOR2.65 Greg Maddux ATL2.22
SO Roger Clemens 1 TOR271 Curt Schilling PHI300
SV Tom Gordon BOS46 Trevor Hoffman SD53
SB Rickey Henderson OAK66 Tony Womack PIT58

1 American League Triple Crown pitching winner

Managers

American League

TeamManagerNotes
Anaheim Angels Terry Collins
Baltimore Orioles Ray Miller
Boston Red Sox Jimy Williams
Chicago White Sox Jerry Manuel
Cleveland Indians Mike Hargrove
Detroit Tigers Buddy Bell, Larry Parrish Bell (52–85, .380), Parrish (13–12, .520)
Kansas City Royals Tony Muser
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Joe Torre Won the World Series
Oakland Athletics Art Howe
Seattle Mariners Lou Piniella
Tampa Bay Devil Rays Larry Rothschild Expansion team
Texas Rangers Johnny Oates
Toronto Blue Jays Tim Johnson

National League

TeamManagerNotes
Arizona Diamondbacks Buck Showalter Expansion team
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox
Chicago Cubs Jim Riggleman
Cincinnati Reds Jack McKeon
Colorado Rockies Don Baylor
Florida Marlins Jim Leyland
Houston Astros Larry Dierker
Los Angeles Dodgers Bill Russell, Glenn Hoffman Russell (36–38, .486), Hoffman (47–41, .534)
Milwaukee Brewers Phil Garner
Montreal Expos Felipe Alou
New York Mets Bobby Valentine
Philadelphia Phillies Terry Francona
Pittsburgh Pirates Gene Lamont
St. Louis Cardinals Tony La Russa
San Diego Padres Bruce Bochy Won National League pennant
San Francisco Giants Dusty Baker

Home field attendance & payroll

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer GameEst. Payroll
Colorado Rockies [3] 77-7.2%3,792,683-2.5%46,823$50,484,64815.9%
Baltimore Orioles [4] 79-19.4%3,684,650-0.7%45,490$72,525,63423.9%
Arizona Diamondbacks [5] 653,610,29044,571$32,347,000
Cleveland Indians [6] 893.5%3,467,2991.8%42,806$61,718,1668.7%
Atlanta Braves [7] 1065.0%3,360,860-3.0%41,492$61,186,00017.0%
St. Louis Cardinals [8] 8313.7%3,195,69121.3%38,972$54,672,52120.3%
Los Angeles Dodgers [9] 83-5.7%3,089,222-6.9%38,139$48,820,0007.6%
New York Yankees [10] 11418.8%2,955,19314.5%36,484$66,806,8677.3%
Texas Rangers [11] 8814.3%2,927,399-0.6%36,141$56,752,0956.2%
Seattle Mariners [12] 76-15.6%2,651,511-16.9%32,735$54,802,03631.9%
Chicago Cubs [13] 9032.4%2,623,19419.8%31,990$50,838,00020.6%
San Diego Padres [14] 9828.9%2,555,87422.3%31,554$46,861,50025.4%
Anaheim Angels [15] 851.2%2,519,28042.5%31,102$41,791,00034.2%
Tampa Bay Devil Rays [16] 632,506,29330,942$27,280,000
Houston Astros [17] 10221.4%2,458,45120.1%30,351$42,374,00021.8%
Toronto Blue Jays [18] 8815.8%2,454,303-5.2%30,300$51,376,0009.1%
Boston Red Sox [19] 9217.9%2,314,7044.0%28,577$56,927,00030.7%
New York Mets [20] 880.0%2,287,94829.5%28,246$52,247,99931.3%
San Francisco Giants [21] 89-1.1%1,925,36413.9%23,770$42,738,33420.1%
Milwaukee Brewers [22] 74-5.1%1,811,59325.5%22,365$34,139,90444.3%
Cincinnati Reds [23] 771.3%1,793,6490.4%22,144$23,005,000-53.8%
Florida Marlins [24] 54-41.3%1,730,384-26.8%21,363$41,864,667-14.0%
Philadelphia Phillies [25] 7510.3%1,715,72215.1%21,182$36,297,500-1.0%
Pittsburgh Pirates [26] 69-12.7%1,560,950-5.8%19,271$15,065,00039.9%
Kansas City Royals [27] 727.5%1,494,875-1.5%18,686$38,097,5009.4%
Detroit Tigers [28] 65-17.7%1,409,3913.2%17,400$24,265,00040.5%
Chicago White Sox [29] 800.0%1,391,146-25.4%16,965$39,850,000-31.0%
Oakland Athletics [30] 7413.8%1,232,343-2.5%15,214$21,473,000-10.6%
Minnesota Twins [31] 702.9%1,165,976-17.4%14,395$28,097,500-17.5%
Montreal Expos [32] 65-16.7%914,909-38.9%11,295$10,641,500-44.8%

Events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

See also

Related Research Articles

The following are the baseball events of the year 1998 throughout the world.

1998 Major League Baseball home run record chase

The 1998 Major League Baseball home run chase was the race between first baseman Mark McGwire of the St. Louis Cardinals, and right fielder Sammy Sosa of the Chicago Cubs that resulted in McGwire and Sosa breaking Roger Maris's long-standing and highly coveted record of 61 home runs. McGwire broke Maris's record on September 8 against the Cubs and finished with 70 home runs. Sosa finished with 66.

The 2000 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees defeating the New York Mets in five games, for their third consecutive World Series title. The 2000 World Series was known as the Subway Series because both fans and the two teams could take the subway to and from every game of the series.

The 2007 Major League Baseball season began on April 1 with a rematch of the 2006 National League Championship Series; the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets played the first game of the season at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, which was won by the Mets, 6–1. The regular season concluded with seven teams entering the postseason who had failed to reach the 2006 playoffs including all National League teams, with only the New York Yankees returning; a dramatic one-game playoff between the Colorado Rockies and San Diego Padres; and the largest September collapse for a leading team in baseball history, with the Mets squandering a 7-game lead with 17 to play, losing on the final day of the regular season, and the Philadelphia Phillies capturing the National League East for the first time since 1993. The season ended on October 28, with the Boston Red Sox sweeping the World Series over the Rockies, four games to none.

The 1997 Major League Baseball season was the inaugural season for Interleague play, as well as the final season in the American League for the Milwaukee Brewers before moving to the NL the following season. The California Angels changed their name to the Anaheim Angels. The Florida Marlins ended the season as the World Champions defeating the Cleveland Indians in a seven-game World Series, four games to three.

The 1995 Major League Baseball season was the first season to be played under the expanded postseason format, as the League Division Series (LDS) was played in both the American and National leagues for the first time. However, due to the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike which carried into the 1995 season, a shortened 144-game schedule commenced on April 25, when the Florida Marlins played host to the Los Angeles Dodgers.

The 1999 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the Atlanta Braves in the World Series.

The 1990 Major League Baseball season saw the Cincinnati Reds upset the heavily favored Oakland Athletics in the World Series, for their first title since 1976.

The 1989 Major League Baseball season saw the Oakland Athletics win their first World Series title since 1974.

The 1987 Major League Baseball season ended with the American League Champion Minnesota Twins winning the World Series over the National League Champion St. Louis Cardinals, four games to three, as all seven games were won by the home team.

The 1980 Major League Baseball season saw the Philadelphia Phillies win their first World Series Championship.

The 1979 Major League Baseball season. None of the post-season teams of 1977 or 1978 returned to this year's postseason. In a re-match of the 1971 World Series, the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Baltimore Orioles in seven games in the 1979 World Series.

The 1949 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 18 through October 15, 1949. Both the American League (AL) and National League (NL) had eight teams, with each team playing a 154-game schedule. The New York Yankees won the World Series over the Brooklyn Dodgers in five games. Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox and Jackie Robinson of the Dodgers won the Most Valuable Player Award in the AL and NL, respectively.

The 1939 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 17 to October 8, 1939. The Cincinnati Reds and New York Yankees were the regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. The Yankees then defeated the Reds in the World Series, four games to none. The Yankees became the first team to win the World Series four years in a row.

The 1978 Major League Baseball season saw the New York Yankees defeat the Los Angeles Dodgers to win their second consecutive World Series, and 22nd overall, in a rematch of the prior season's Fall Classic. The Yankees overcame clubhouse turmoil, a mid-season managerial change, and a 14-game mid-July deficit in the American League East en route to the championship. All four teams that made the playoffs in 1977 returned for this postseason; none of the four returned to the postseason in 1979.

The 1970 Major League Baseball season. The Seattle Pilots relocated to Milwaukee and became the Brewers, thus returning Major League Baseball to Wisconsin for the first time since the relocation of the Milwaukee Braves to Atlanta following the 1965 season. Major League Baseball returned to Seattle in 1977, when the Mariners began play.

The 1963 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 8 to October 6, 1963. The American League and National League both featured ten teams, with each team playing a 162-game schedule.

The 1965 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 12 to October 14, 1965. The Los Angeles Dodgers and Minnesota Twins were the regular season champions of the National League and American League, respectively. The Dodgers then defeated the Twins in the World Series, four games to three.

The 1971 Major League Baseball season was the final season for the Senators in Washington, D.C., before the team's relocation to the Dallas-Fort Worth suburb Arlington for the following season, as the Texas Rangers, leaving the nation's capital without a baseball team of its own until 2005.

The 1961 Major League Baseball season was played from April 10 to October 12, 1961. That season saw the New York Yankees defeat the Cincinnati Reds in five games in the World Series. The season is best known for Yankee teammates Roger Maris' and Mickey Mantle's pursuit of Babe Ruth's prestigious 34-year-old single-season home run record of 60. Maris ultimately broke the record when he hit his 61st home run on the final day of the regular season, while Mantle was forced out of the lineup in late-September due to a hip infection and finished with 54 home runs.

References

  1. With an odd number of teams (15), only seven games would be able to be scheduled in each league on any given day during the intra-league portion of the regular season. Thus, one team in each league would have had to be idle on any given day. This would have made it difficult for scheduling, in terms of travel days and the need to end the regular season before October. See Major League Baseball#League organization. If each league had wished to remain at fifteen teams, the schedule would have had to include one inter-league game during each day of intra-league play. Instead, with each league now having an even number of teams, interleague games occur only in certain parts of the regular season.
  2. "McGwire apologizes to La Russa, Selig". ESPN.com. January 11, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2010.
  3. "Colorado Rockies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Arizona Diamondbacks Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Tampa Bay Rays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. "Florida Marlins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  28. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  29. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  30. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  31. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  32. "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  33. "Riggleman reflects on Kerry Wood's 1998 season". suntimes.com. June 18, 2006. Retrieved July 13, 2014.
  34. "1998 Awards Voting - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 17, 2018.
  35. "Randy Johnson Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 17, 2018.