1908 World Series

Last updated

1908 World Series
1908WorldSeries.png
Team (Wins)Manager(s) Season
Chicago Cubs (4) Frank Chance (player/manager) 99–55, .643, GA: 1
Detroit Tigers (1) Hughie Jennings 90–63, .588, GA: 12
DatesOctober 10–14
Umpires Jack Sheridan (AL), Hank O'Day (NL), odd-numbered games; Bill Klem (NL), Tommy Connolly (AL), even-numbered games
Hall of FamersUmpires:
Tommy Connolly
Bill Klem
Hank O'Day
Cubs:
Mordecai Brown
Frank Chance
Johnny Evers
Joe Tinker
Tigers:
Sam Crawford
Ty Cobb
Broadcast
  1907 World Series 1909  

The 1908 World Series matched the defending champion Chicago Cubs against the Detroit Tigers in a rematch of the 1907 Series. In this first-ever rematch of this young event, the Cubs won in five games for their second straight World Series title. (Sites: game 1 in Detroit; games 2, 3 in Chicago; games 4, 5 in Detroit.)

Contents

The 1908 World Series was significant for being the last World Series championship the Cubs would win until the 2016 World Series (108 years later). Before the 2016 series, the team would go on to appear in seven World Series; in 1910, 1918, 1929, 1932, 1935, 1938, and 1945, losing each time. The Cubs had been one of baseball's most dominant teams in the early 1900s. This was the year of the infamous "Merkle's Boner" play that allowed the Chicago Cubs to reach the World Series after beating the New York Giants (now the San Francisco Giants) in a one-game "playoff", actually the makeup game for the tie that the Merkle play had caused.

The Series was anticlimactic after tight pennant races in both leagues. Ty Cobb had a much better World Series than in the previous year, as did the rest of his team. The final two games, held in Detroit, were shutouts. This was also the most poorly attended World Series in history, with the final game drawing a record-low 6,210 fans. Attendance in Chicago was harmed by a ticket-scalping scheme that fans accused the club's owner of participating in, and the World Series was boycotted to some degree.

For the first time, four umpires were used in the series, in alternating two-man teams.

Summary

NL Chicago Cubs (4) vs. AL Detroit Tigers (1)

GameDateScoreLocationTimeAttendance 
1October 10Chicago Cubs – 10, Detroit Tigers – 6 Bennett Park 2:1010,812 [1]  
2October 11Detroit Tigers – 1, Chicago Cubs – 6 West Side Grounds 1:3017,760 [2]  
3October 12Detroit Tigers – 8, Chicago Cubs – 3West Side Grounds2:1014,543 [3]  
4October 13Chicago Cubs – 3, Detroit Tigers – 0Bennett Park1:3512,907 [4]  
5October 14Chicago Cubs – 2, Detroit Tigers – 0Bennett Park1:256,210 [5]

Matchups

Game 1

Saturday, October 10, 1908, at Bennett Park in Detroit, Michigan

Team123456789 R H E
Chicago00400010510142
Detroit1000003206103
WP: Mordecai Brown (1–0)   LP: Ed Summers (0–1)

The Tigers struck first in Game 1 when Matty McIntyre singled to lead off the bottom of the first off of Ed Reulbach, stole second and scored on Ty Cobb's two-out single, but the Cubs responded in the third off of Ed Killian when after a leadoff double and single, Frank Schulte's RBI single tied the game. After a bunt groundout, Harry Steinfeldt's RBI single put Chicago up 2–1. After a walk, Ed Summers relieved Killian and allowed an RBI groundout to Joe Tinker and Johnny Kling reached on an error that allowed another run to score. The Cubs added another run in the seventh on Steinfedlt's sacrifice fly. In the bottom of the inning, with runners on second and third, Boss Schmidt's groundout, Red Downs's ground-rule double, and Summers's single scored a run each. Next inning, Claude Rossman's two-run single off of Mordecai Brown put the Tigers up 6–5. In the top of the ninth, three straight one-out singles loaded the bases before Solly Hofman's single scored two and Joe Tinker's bunt single scored another. After a double steal, Johnny King's two-run single put the Cubs up 10–6. Brown pitched a scoreless bottom of the ninth despite allowing a single and walk as the Cubs went up 1–0 in the series.

Game 2

Sunday, October 11, 1908, at West Side Grounds in Chicago

Team123456789 R H E
Detroit000000001141
Chicago00000006X670
WP: Orval Overall (1–0)   LP: Wild Bill Donovan (0–1)
Home runs:
DET: None
CHC: Joe Tinker (1)

A scoreless tie in the bottom of the eighth came to an end when Joe Tinker's two-run homer launched a six-run Cub outburst. After a ground-rule double and groundout, RBI singles by Jimmy Sheckard and Johnny Evers and an RBI triple by Frank Schulte (the last two hits coming off after stolen bases) scored a run each. A wild pitch to Frank Chance scored the Cubs' last run. The Tigers avoided a shutout in the ninth when Davy Jones drew a leadoff walk, moved to second on a groundout and scored on Ty Cobb's single. Orval Overall's complete-game win took just 90 minutes.

Game 3

Monday, October 12, 1908, at West Side Grounds in Chicago, Illinois

Team123456789 R H E
Detroit1000050208124
Chicago000300000370
WP: George Mullin (1–0)   LP: Jack Pfiester (0–1)

It was in this game that Ty Cobb enjoyed the finest World Series outing he ever had. The 21-year-old Georgian rapped three singles and a double in five at-bats, and stole two bases. In the top of the ninth, he singled and promptly stole second and third, but then the hyped-up boy wonder pressed his luck and was thrown out trying to steal home. This was the only Tiger win in their back-to-back first two World Series losses to the Cubs. Detroit struck first in the top of the first when Charley O'Leary hit a one-out single, moved to second on a groundout and scored on Ty Cobb's single. The Cubs responded in the fourth on Frank Chance's RBI single. After stealing second, an error on Harry Steinfeldt's ground ball and Solly Hofman's triple scored a run each. In the top of the sixth, after a single and walk, singles by Sam Crawford, Ty Cobb, and Claude Rossman scored a run each. After a double play, Ira Thomas's RBI double made it 6–3 Tigers. They added two more runs in the eighth on Bill Coughlin's bases loaded sacrifice fly followed by George Mullin's RBI single.

Game 4

Tuesday, October 13, 1908, at Bennett Park in Detroit, Michigan

Team123456789 R H E
Chicago0020000013100
Detroit000000000041
WP: Mordecai Brown (2–0)   LP: Ed Summers (0–2)

This one was over in 95 minutes. RBI singles by Harry Steinfeldt and Solly Hofman in the third inning after two walks gave Mordecai Brown all the support he'd need. Brown allowed only four hits and walked none. The Cubs added another run in the ninth when Frank Chance reached on an error with two on.

Game 5

Wednesday, October 14, 1908, at Bennett Park in Detroit, Michigan

Team123456789 R H E
Chicago1000100002100
Detroit000000000030
WP: Orval Overall (2–0)   LP: Wild Bill Donovan (0–2)
Home runs:
CHC: None
DET: Yay

The attendance during this last game of the 1908 World Series (6,210) was the smallest crowd in Series history.

Overall allowed only three hits, walking four and striking out 10 for his second win of the series. In 18.1 innings, he allowed only seven hits and two runs for an ERA of 0.98. During the 1st, Overall pitched an immaculate inning.

The Cubs scored the game's first run in the first on three straight one-out singles, the last of which to Frank Chance scoring a run, then added another run in the fifth on Johnny Evers's double after two walks.

Boss Schmidt, who made the last out of the 1907 Series with a popup to short, also made the last out of this Series with a feeble catcher-to-first groundout.

This was also the first World Series game in which neither team committed an error.

The Cubs would not win another World Series title until finally reclaiming the crown in 2016.

Composite line score

1908 World Series (4–1): Chicago Cubs (N.L.) over Detroit Tigers (A.L.)

Team123456789 R H E
Chicago Cubs 10631016624482
Detroit Tigers 20000534115339
Total attendance: 62,232  Average attendance: 12,446
Winning player's share: $1,318  Losing player's share: $870 [6]

Notes

  1. "1908 World Series Game 1 – Chicago Cubs vs. Detroit Tigers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. "1908 World Series Game 2 – Detroit Tigers vs. Chicago Cubs". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. "1908 World Series Game 3 – Detroit Tigers vs. Chicago Cubs". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. "1908 World Series Game 4 – Chicago Cubs vs. Detroit Tigers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. "1908 World Series Game 5 – Chicago Cubs vs. Detroit Tigers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved June 14, 2009.

Related Research Articles

1945 World Series

The 1945 World Series matched the American League Champion Detroit Tigers against the National League Champion Chicago Cubs. The Tigers won the Series in seven games, giving them their second championship and first since 1935.

1984 World Series 81st edition of Major League Baseballs championship series

The 1984 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1984 season. The 81st edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff played between the American League (AL) champion Detroit Tigers and the National League (NL) champion San Diego Padres. The Tigers won the series, four games to one. This was the city of Detroit's first sports championship since the Tigers themselves won the 1968 World Series.

1913 World Series

In the 1913 World Series, the American League (AL) champion Philadelphia Athletics defeated the National League (NL) New York Giants four games to one.

The 1932 World Series was a four-game sweep by the American League champions New York Yankees over the National League champions Chicago Cubs. By far its most noteworthy moment was Babe Ruth's "called shot" home run, in his 10th and last World Series. It was punctuated by fiery arguments between the two teams, heating up the atmosphere before the World Series even began. A record 13 future Hall of Famers played in this Series, with three other future Hall of Famers also participating: umpire Bill Klem; Yankee's manager Joe McCarthy; and Cubs manager Rogers Hornsby. It was also the first in which both teams wore uniforms with numbers on the backs of the shirts.

The 1935 World Series featured the Detroit Tigers and the Chicago Cubs, with the Tigers winning in six games for their first championship in five Series appearances. They had lost in 1907, 1908, 1909, and 1934.

The 1939 World Series featured the three-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Cincinnati Reds, who were making their first Series appearance since winning the scandal-tainted 1919 World Series. The Yankees swept the Series in four games for the second straight year, winning their record fourth consecutive title. Yankee manager Joe McCarthy won his fifth title, tying the record held by Philadelphia Athletics manager Connie Mack.

The 1940 World Series matched the Cincinnati Reds against the Detroit Tigers, with the Reds winning a closely contested seven-game series. The victory secured the Reds the second championship in their franchise history and came 21 years after their victory over the scandal-tainted Chicago White Sox in 1919. This would be the Reds' last World Series championship for 35 years despite appearances in 1961, 1970, and 1972. Meanwhile, Bill Klem worked the last of his record 18 World Series as an umpire.

The 1948 World Series saw the Cleveland Indians against the Boston Braves. The Braves had won the National League pennant for the first time since the "Miracle Braves" team of 1914, while the Indians had spoiled a chance for the only all-Boston World Series by winning a one-game playoff against the Boston Red Sox for the American League flag. Though superstar pitcher Bob Feller failed to win either of his two starts, the Indians won the Series in six games to capture their second championship and their first since 1920.

1907 World Series

The 1907 World Series featured the Chicago Cubs and the Detroit Tigers, with the Cubs winning the Series four games to none for their first championship. Games 1, 2, 3 were played in Chicago; games 4 and 5 were played in Detroit.

1906 World Series

The 1906 World Series featured a crosstown matchup between the Chicago Cubs, who had posted the highest regular-season win total (116) and winning percentage (.763) in the major leagues since the advent of the 154-game season; and the Chicago White Sox. The White Sox, known as the "Hitless Wonders" after finishing with the worst team batting average (.230) in the American League, beat the Cubs in six games for one of the greatest upsets in Series history. This was the first World Series played by two teams from the same metropolitan area.

2005 American League Division Series

The 2005 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2005 American League postseason, began on Tuesday, October 4, and ended on Monday, October 10, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

2003 National League Championship Series

The 2003 National League Championship Series (NLCS) was a Major League Baseball playoff series played from October 7 to 15 to determine the champion of the National League, between the Central Division champion Chicago Cubs and the wild-card qualifying Florida Marlins. The Cubs, by virtue of being a division winner, had the home field advantage. The Marlins came back from a three games to one deficit and won the series in seven games, advancing to the World Series against the New York Yankees, whom they defeated in six games.

The 1984 American League Championship Series matched the East Division champion Detroit Tigers against the West Division champion Kansas City Royals. The Tigers took the series in a three-game sweep to advance to the 1984 World Series against the San Diego Padres. The series was the 16th ALCS in all and the last to be played as a best-of-five. In 1985, the League Championship Series changed to a best-of-seven format.

2006 American League Championship Series

The 2006 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 2006 American League playoffs, began on October 10 and ended on October 14. The wild card Detroit Tigers swept the West Division champion Oakland Athletics 4 games to none to advance to the 2006 World Series, and became the fourth AL team to win 10 pennants, joining the New York Yankees (39), the Athletics (15), and the Boston Red Sox (11). Magglio Ordóñez's game-winning walk-off home run in the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 4 sealed the pennant for the Tigers. This ALCS marked the 5th different AL pennant winner in as many years.

The 2006 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2006 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Saturday, October 7, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

2003 National League Division Series

The 2003 National League Division Series (NLDS), the first round of the 2003 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 30, and ended on Sunday, October 5, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

The 1984 National League Championship Series was played between the San Diego Padres and the Chicago Cubs from October 2 to 7. San Diego won the series three games to two to advance to the World Series. It was the first postseason series ever for the Padres since the franchise's beginning in 1969, and the first appearance by the Cubs in postseason play since the 1945 World Series. Chicago took a 2–0 lead in the series, but San Diego prevailed after rebounding to win three straight, which contributed to the popular mythology of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" on the Cubs. The series was the 16th NLCS in all and the last to be played as a best-of-five. In 1985, the League Championship Series changed to a best-of-seven format.

2007 National League Division Series

The 2007 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2007 National League playoffs, began on Wednesday, October 3 and ended on Saturday, October 6, with the champions of the three NL divisions and one wild card team participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

1907 Detroit Tigers season Major League Baseball season

The 1907 Detroit Tigers won the American League pennant with a record of 92–58, but lost to the Chicago Cubs in the 1907 World Series, four games to none. The season was their 7th since they entered the American League in 1901.

2008 National League Division Series

The 2008 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2008 National League playoffs, began on Wednesday, October 1 and ended on Sunday, October 5, with the champions of the three NL divisions and one wild card team participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

References